Author Topic: Cattle and dogs  (Read 2860 times)

Offline Txebb

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Cattle and dogs
« on: May 07, 2016, 10:42:57 PM »
Just brought a herd of 9 cattle last month onto the property. After having seen my neighbor's dog chase my cattle, I been keeping my beagle-shepard mixed dog inside the house fence. I did try to introduce them and it went okay for a little bit. The dog went to investigate the herd and the cattle all came over to sniff the new guy. It went well for about 15 minutes, then my dog barked which made the cattle jump. Then my dog went on to bark and chase the herd across the pasture. Since then I have been keeping him fenced in and taking to walking him leashed around the cattle. I've been attempting to deter him from barking or growling at the cattle and to get him to accept them as part of the landscape now. I was wondering if anyone had any advice on how to train a dog not to chase cattle.

Offline Cedar

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Re: Cattle and dogs
« Reply #1 on: May 08, 2016, 07:38:13 AM »
The second the dog barked, you needed to flip it on its back, or at least jerk really hard on the leash and yell "bad dog" at it. Each and every time it barked or went towards the cattle. Tell the dog in no uncertain terms this is not acceptable. Flipping on its back and staring it in the eyes while voicing your displeasure until it looks away. When it looks away it is being submissive, let it back up.

Take some treats and every time the dog ignores the cattle or responds to "leave it" give it a treat. Since it is part beagle, it ought to be food oriented.

Dogs chasing livestock is SERIOUS!

I am am surprised the cattle did not bunch up and attempt to blast or kick the dog. Are they young?

Cedar

Offline Txebb

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Re: Cattle and dogs
« Reply #2 on: May 08, 2016, 08:20:00 PM »
The second the dog barked, you needed to flip it on its back, or at least jerk really hard on the leash and yell "bad dog" at it. Each and every time it barked or went towards the cattle. Tell the dog in no uncertain terms this is not acceptable. Flipping on its back and staring it in the eyes while voicing your displeasure until it looks away. When it looks away it is being submissive, let it back up.

Take some treats and every time the dog ignores the cattle or responds to "leave it" give it a treat. Since it is part beagle, it ought to be food oriented.

Dogs chasing livestock is SERIOUS!

I am am surprised the cattle did not bunch up and attempt to blast or kick the dog. Are they young?

Cedar

No, not young, a mix of ages and breeds in this herd. They seem to prefer to move away from anything if they have the option. The only time I've seen them bunch is when they were cornered along the fence by the neighbor's dog. Then the fence started leaning as several thousand pounds of beef pushed in one spot.

Thank you for the advice.

Offline greencountry

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Re: Cattle and dogs
« Reply #3 on: January 23, 2017, 09:51:50 PM »
I see this is an older thread but will give my advise/experience. After I had trouble with our dog chasing cattle/chickens I purchased one of the cheap $35 (at the time) remote shock collars off EBAY. It worked like a charm.
 The day it came in the mail just so happened to be the same day our dog killed a chicken earlier in the morning. I left the chicken laying were he left it. Put the collar on him, and started mowing the yard. Each time he got near that chicken or any of the others I would push the button. If he got near the chicken house, push the button. Let me tell you he is a quick learner. Only had to shock him a few times and he hasn't bothered a chicken in the last 5 years. I did not yell at him or say a word because I wanted him to associate being around a chicken with the pain. Otherwise if he knew I was the one doing it he might think it is okay if I'm not around to chase them.
 The collar has a 1-100 scale on the shock. He is a smaller dog (rat terrier mix) so I only set it on 20-25 if I remember right. It also has a button to make it beep and another button to make it vibrate.
 On a couple occasions he started to chase the cows. All I had to do was just make it vibrate and he stopped immediately. He has not had to were the collar in a few years now. Since he is a terrier he loves to chase. Once in a while he will start to chase a cow but only for about 8-10 feet then he is done.
 I highly recommend these collars. We have used it on another one of our dogs that would run out into the road. She learned after 2 zaps to stay out of the road.

One more thing on cattle. Once you have a momma cow with a baby, she wont run from the dog. She will stand her ground and will in most cases chase the dog back. If you get a lot of momma cows together most of the herd will chase the dog at the same time ,and its a funny SOB to watch. 

Offline LvsChant

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Re: Cattle and dogs
« Reply #4 on: April 25, 2018, 05:33:44 PM »
I really like this idea... we never did get our two dogs to stop bothering the chickens (right up until some wild critter got them and ended our flock). I know we are going to try again with the chickens and we will try this out when we do to train the dogs...