Author Topic: Topic: LISTENING to your anti-prep neighbors  (Read 8860 times)

Offline Sleepyhare

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Topic: LISTENING to your anti-prep neighbors
« on: May 17, 2016, 08:21:04 PM »
Just a thought for a topic or discussion. We all have those neighbors that are totally against prepping and think we are weird and nothing bad will ever happen (or those neighbors you just don't want to tell that you do for opsec). You don't have to talk to them or convince them, but you should know and listen to them. Little things to log away in your memory. 'Suzy down the block is a nurse'. She doesn't believe in prepping but will when shtf. Now you know who to get for medical skills, and shes likely to trade those skills for the food she doesn't have. Bob is a mechanic and has tools. Mary is a seamstress. Albert and Gloria love to grow a massive vegetable garden. Rick is retired military or police. Lots of people around us have skills that will be handy when the time comes. We just need to listen so we know who and what. We don't need to convince them to prepare, they will be desperate to trade their skills when it means their families survival. So don't stress over talking to your neighbors, but do listen to them.

Offline hackmeister

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Re: Topic: LISTENING to your anti-prep neighbors
« Reply #1 on: May 18, 2016, 07:30:30 AM »
A good way to ease into the discussion is start with less controversial starting points:
- Do you hunt or fish?
- Do you garden?
If yes, do you know how to preserve your foods? Canning, salting, smoking, etc..

After that talk about long term food storage and water collection. Not many people are scared of gardeners and fishermen.

Offline Sailor

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Re: Topic: LISTENING to your anti-prep neighbors
« Reply #2 on: May 18, 2016, 09:09:15 AM »
I let them know I have a generator and if power is out I can help with their sump pumps, furnace, freezers etc.  That usually gets the ball rolling. 

Offline I.L.W.

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Re: Topic: LISTENING to your anti-prep neighbors
« Reply #3 on: May 18, 2016, 12:30:18 PM »
I'm an expert at understanding people, but a complete idiot when it comes to actually dealing with them, lol. I don't use the term "prepper" or "survivalist", not because they are inaccurate, but they conjure the wrong image in the minds of the uninitiated. There are many veiled ways to get people open to the idea.

That new solar or wind system to get you off grid is because you're sick of paying ever-increasing utility rates, or you "want to do something good for the environment", lol.

Growing your own food can be approached from a health perspective with basic nutritional data on commercial vs home grown crops. It can be a hobby, a family tradition, or  to get types of food you can't buy in your area. If you attach the term "prepper" to that activity, people assume you're just hoarding rations in anticipation of the end-times. Some people do that, and your neighbors are right, those people are f*ing nuts. Honing your skills and maintaining a healthy surplus of food will benefit you if you enter the Shit-hits-the-fan scenario, but if you're honest with yourself, that's not the primary reason you would engage in these activities. There are more immediate and assured benefits to cultivating a lifestyle of resiliency. The benefits are not scenario driven.

If someone takes issue with your hunting, flip the PC bullshit around on them "My grandfather is (insert any native culture)... we need to keep our way of life alive through the practice of our traditions. I'm sorry my people's culture offends you". It's the ultimate trump-card for the sycophantic brain-washed far-left suburbanite ideologues. That statement is like kryptonite to their morally righteous self-image, so ram it up their ass the first chance you get and they'll be licking your boots in no time  8) The proper response to passive-aggressive is overt aggression (just in a non-threatening way). Don't worry about what such people think, if you establish yourself as the alpha-dog, they will follow you. Be unrepentant, undeterred, but welcoming.

At the core of your point, you're talking about "community" on a local scale, maybe a few dozen people or families. There's one thing you need to understand when building your own community: people instinctively follow a tribal system. Look at every "primitive" culture in the world, they follow the same structure. There are roles or primal archetypes that people assign themselves when working together, and we recreate these types of organization in modern life.

The basic Archetypes are:
Village Elders - The experienced people with a capacity to lead others.
Warriors - The defense minded.
Hunters - Opportunists in Resource procurement
Farmers - Resource generation.
Craftsmen - Support systems and tradecraft
Home makers - Domestic responsibilities, child rearing
Shaman - Philosophers, teachers, those with wisdom and social objectivity.
Dependants - usually children or the infirmed who have little at this moment to contribute.

It's easy to see how these play out in a true "tribe", but you can probably find their modern-day equivalents in the workplace. There are Managers in an office (the elders), there is security (physical security, information security, lawyers etc) who make up the warrior class. Hunters can be found in sales and acquisitions, looking for opportunities to exploit for resources. The common worker in any office is like a farmer, they toil away to produce some product or service. There are always support people, be they tool makers, technical support etc who devise solutions and improve efficiency making up the craftsmen class. The domestic workers may be a Human Resources department, and the Shaman class is usually the socially isolated but exceptionally proficient person in the office, the one everyone goes to for advice, a trainer, mentor, expert etc.

You can dissect any group of people and reduce it to these basic roles. Every effective group follows this model, be it intentional or not. Look at Jack's "Expert Council" and the vocations of each member. Branches of Government, high school social clicks... Everyone who is useful to society falls into at least one of these categories. These roles also can be extended, quite literally to prepping activities. If you can determine what type of person they are, you can determine what aspects of prepping might appeal to them.

If the guy across the street is a City Councilman, he's a leader and probably doesn't give half a shit about fishing. He may enjoy it as a hobby, but he's not going to see that skill as vital to his survival or as a means of improving the quality of his life. He'd be more valuable in discussions like this one about the community, talking about the police, community gardens and markets. The soccer mom next door will probably love it if you keep a few chickens. She's a homemaker, and feeding the chickens is entertainment for her kids, offers an educational opportunity, and if you share some eggs, it's good nutritious food for her family of a quality she cannot otherwise buy. That activity has multiple levels of appeal to her. Start talking about guns and tactical training however, she'll react very differently. Make your appeal to the primal archetype they most embody, and you will find them receptive.

Now identify the dependants in your area. In modern times, these will often be welfare recipients, the severely disabled, the elderly (some of whom merely have skills which are now obsolete, negating their possible contributions, but age is not an immediate disqualifier). These people have little to contribute. That doesn't mean they should be discounted, their lives have value. However, this is where you'll meet your strongest opposition. Some will be friendly and supportive, some will not. They by definition cannot participate in what you're doing, don't see themselves as the beneficiaries of your efforts, and often have lots of free time to form uneducated opinions about what you're doing, even when it's no concern of theirs. This is the old lady who freaks out because you have a garden instead of a lawn in your own backyard, or calls the police because there's a car parked on the curb and not in your driveway. Every community has one. If yours has more than one who you interact with, pack up and move. They will suck the life out of the community and bring about a state of decay. On the internet, we call these people "trolls" and they delight in killing communities. You need to be rid of them to succeed, but if you take any action against them, you will become the outcast. It's best to passively exclude them and if need-be, move your operations away from their influence.

Online FreeLancer

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Re: Topic: LISTENING to your anti-prep neighbors
« Reply #4 on: May 18, 2016, 07:20:08 PM »
I live within sight of a famous fault line that is decades overdue for its routine 8.0 pressure release that is predicted to kill thousands of people. I'm not a prepper, I'm getting ready for a well-known earthquake threat, just like all my neighbors know they should be doing.

If I ever get any grief from anyone about anything that could be construed as prepping, reminding them of that giant elephant in the room usually wipes the goofiness off of all the faces pretty quick. And when they say they'll come stay with me, I say no problem, just make sure you're setup to walk the 3-4 days it will take to get here from work in the OC. 

Offline raginrick

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Re: Topic: LISTENING to your anti-prep neighbors
« Reply #5 on: June 12, 2016, 09:46:21 PM »
Freelance, must live somewhere near me. Felt that 5.2 the other day and guess what water was gone at the store. I don't understand why people wait.

Offline SloSheepdog

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Re: Topic: LISTENING to your anti-prep neighbors
« Reply #6 on: June 13, 2016, 12:11:12 PM »
Great points everyone. It's a fun brain exercise to run through your phone contacts and a mental list of your neighbors and think about how you could help each other and what skills they may have, as well as people who would need help and possible "troublesome people."

In my case, I realized that I would like to be able to feed and care for more people than I was planning on.

Offline Carl

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Re: Topic: LISTENING to your anti-prep neighbors
« Reply #7 on: June 13, 2016, 01:04:51 PM »
Freelance, must live somewhere near me. Felt that 5.2 the other day and guess what water was gone at the store. I don't understand why people wait.

Bread and vienna sausages disappear here in Louisiana at first sign of a storm...what are they thinking?

Offline CagedFeral

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Re: Topic: LISTENING to your anti-prep neighbors
« Reply #8 on: September 23, 2016, 05:28:02 AM »
Sometimes they find you. My wife and mother were canning and had boxes out on the porch when the trash pickup guy stopped. Got to talking and now for the last few years we trade. My wife cans alot of things they don't and vice versa. We make trades often when he stops.

If I get these blackberries really going I'm pretty sure I could pay for my trash pickup. Him and his wife love the jams my wife cans. I love his wifes pickles and tomato.

Also, my neighbor cross the road is an older farmer. He bushhogs my field when needed and just helped level a new septic leach field with his tractor. He is slowing down and knows he can call for any help when I'm home and I do his car oil changes regularly. He won't let me touch his tractor though  :).

Sometimes no talk of prepping is needed. You just find good like minded people you like and make win win deals.


Offline DDJ

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Re: Topic: LISTENING to your anti-prep neighbors
« Reply #9 on: September 23, 2016, 11:01:13 AM »
I found that doing my "prepping" work outside attracts attention of those around me.  When they see Black smoke rolling from in front of my garage and hear the ringing of hammer on steel they tend to walk down the Alley.  standing around in my Bee hood lighting the smoker draws attention as well, yes in a positive way.  Not so much when I build a new raised bed, but I can say that my compost has drawing stares and started conversations.  Running the table saw and building storage items can also draw people in.  You know a guy has to walk over and see what is up when you are laying under the car.  When the wife has the canner running on the back porch or better yet is drying herbs it can bring them over because the area smells of mint, onion, or what ever. 

Give then a taste of honey fresh for the hive (I also recommend sharing just a little of your harvest so that they like the Bees, because they get something out of them), hand them the hammer and let them pound on hot steel.

If you are willing to train and talk about what you are doing not as much why I see that there are a lot of people who want to listen and then their questions and what they do starts to change.  We are building gardens or improving the ones we have.  Developing skills that are a hobby cutting our energy bills.  All of these things are prepping they are also skills that today's middle aged adults do not do.  Play on their curiosity and what I call a primal wish to go back to roots.  These teaching experiences, if you as the OP stated listen as well it can lead to conversations that lead to people thinking outside the TV dinner.  Don't be the crazy guy next door who is a prepper.  You need to be the guy so "makes neat stuff", "have you tasted his FRESH honey", "look at their garden, did you know that they turn their grass and leaves into the greatest dirt I have ever seen", and my favorite "what is that wonderful smell coming from their yard now".  The best of all is the "I can do that too it looks easy".

Opsec is very important do not hear me say live in a glass house, but the more you do in the light of day the less they look down at what you are doing in the shadows.  The way to build community is to work together and the less you hide the more you are already part of the community.

Sorry I may have drifted a bit form the original intent. 

Make sure that you do the same to those around you.  Take interest in what you see the people around you doing.  Do not be nosy but stick your head in say hi learn from them, ask them for help doing what ever you may be doing that they do more that you (soldering copper pipes, running electrical wires, fixing internet issues).  Do not be afraid to give some of your time and energy to help them in a project.  Then they become comfortable and when you need them they are there to help.  Community building is a two way street.  Helping them helps you in the end.  It is contagious you help them they help the lady on the other side that build community and as I.L.W. discussed builds your tribe.  (I took some license there but that is the way I read it).

Offline spud

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Re: Topic: LISTENING to your anti-prep neighbors
« Reply #10 on: October 30, 2016, 08:42:07 PM »
I'm an expert at understanding people, but a complete idiot when it comes to actually dealing with them, lol. I don't use the term "prepper" or "survivalist", not because they are inaccurate, but they conjure the wrong image in the minds of the uninitiated. There are many veiled ways to get people open to the idea.

That new solar or wind system to get you off grid is because you're sick of paying ever-increasing utility rates, or you "want to do something good for the environment", lol.

Growing your own food can be approached from a health perspective with basic nutritional data on commercial vs home grown crops. It can be a hobby, a family tradition, or  to get types of food you can't buy in your area. If you attach the term "prepper" to that activity, people assume you're just hoarding rations in anticipation of the end-times. Some people do that, and your neighbors are right, those people are f*ing nuts. Honing your skills and maintaining a healthy surplus of food will benefit you if you enter the Shit-hits-the-fan scenario, but if you're honest with yourself, that's not the primary reason you would engage in these activities. There are more immediate and assured benefits to cultivating a lifestyle of resiliency. The benefits are not scenario driven.

If someone takes issue with your hunting, flip the PC bullshit around on them "My grandfather is (insert any native culture)... we need to keep our way of life alive through the practice of our traditions. I'm sorry my people's culture offends you". It's the ultimate trump-card for the sycophantic brain-washed far-left suburbanite ideologues. That statement is like kryptonite to their morally righteous self-image, so ram it up their ass the first chance you get and they'll be licking your boots in no time  8) The proper response to passive-aggressive is overt aggression (just in a non-threatening way). Don't worry about what such people think, if you establish yourself as the alpha-dog, they will follow you. Be unrepentant, undeterred, but welcoming.

At the core of your point, you're talking about "community" on a local scale, maybe a few dozen people or families. There's one thing you need to understand when building your own community: people instinctively follow a tribal system. Look at every "primitive" culture in the world, they follow the same structure. There are roles or primal archetypes that people assign themselves when working together, and we recreate these types of organization in modern life.

The basic Archetypes are:
Village Elders - The experienced people with a capacity to lead others.
Warriors - The defense minded.
Hunters - Opportunists in Resource procurement
Farmers - Resource generation.
Craftsmen - Support systems and tradecraft
Home makers - Domestic responsibilities, child rearing
Shaman - Philosophers, teachers, those with wisdom and social objectivity.
Dependants - usually children or the infirmed who have little at this moment to contribute.

It's easy to see how these play out in a true "tribe", but you can probably find their modern-day equivalents in the workplace. There are Managers in an office (the elders), there is security (physical security, information security, lawyers etc) who make up the warrior class. Hunters can be found in sales and acquisitions, looking for opportunities to exploit for resources. The common worker in any office is like a farmer, they toil away to produce some product or service. There are always support people, be they tool makers, technical support etc who devise solutions and improve efficiency making up the craftsmen class. The domestic workers may be a Human Resources department, and the Shaman class is usually the socially isolated but exceptionally proficient person in the office, the one everyone goes to for advice, a trainer, mentor, expert etc.

You can dissect any group of people and reduce it to these basic roles. Every effective group follows this model, be it intentional or not. Look at Jack's "Expert Council" and the vocations of each member. Branches of Government, high school social clicks... Everyone who is useful to society falls into at least one of these categories. These roles also can be extended, quite literally to prepping activities. If you can determine what type of person they are, you can determine what aspects of prepping might appeal to them.

If the guy across the street is a City Councilman, he's a leader and probably doesn't give half a shit about fishing. He may enjoy it as a hobby, but he's not going to see that skill as vital to his survival or as a means of improving the quality of his life. He'd be more valuable in discussions like this one about the community, talking about the police, community gardens and markets. The soccer mom next door will probably love it if you keep a few chickens. She's a homemaker, and feeding the chickens is entertainment for her kids, offers an educational opportunity, and if you share some eggs, it's good nutritious food for her family of a quality she cannot otherwise buy. That activity has multiple levels of appeal to her. Start talking about guns and tactical training however, she'll react very differently. Make your appeal to the primal archetype they most embody, and you will find them receptive.

Now identify the dependants in your area. In modern times, these will often be welfare recipients, the severely disabled, the elderly (some of whom merely have skills which are now obsolete, negating their possible contributions, but age is not an immediate disqualifier). These people have little to contribute. That doesn't mean they should be discounted, their lives have value. However, this is where you'll meet your strongest opposition. Some will be friendly and supportive, some will not. They by definition cannot participate in what you're doing, don't see themselves as the beneficiaries of your efforts, and often have lots of free time to form uneducated opinions about what you're doing, even when it's no concern of theirs. This is the old lady who freaks out because you have a garden instead of a lawn in your own backyard, or calls the police because there's a car parked on the curb and not in your driveway. Every community has one. If yours has more than one who you interact with, pack up and move. They will suck the life out of the community and bring about a state of decay. On the internet, we call these people "trolls" and they delight in killing communities. You need to be rid of them to succeed, but if you take any action against them, you will become the outcast. It's best to passively exclude them and if need-be, move your operations away from their influence.

I have some thoughts on tribal life.  I find it very interesting  but we are so far from it and our whole world revolves around energy and we tend to forget that(machines and equipment have replace people and animal power). Energy has made our life so easy the amount of manual labor has decreased tremendously because of it.  A couple books that I've just read Tribe by Sebastian Junger and 150 Strong by Rob O'Grady are good resources on the topic. Tribal societies didn't have much separation in work like we think. Pretty much all were involved in food collecting and growing etc.  Any disruption in our just in time delivery fantasy world and we are basically screwed cause we don't know another way.  I'm not that positive on our ability to get thru a longer term bump in the road cause we really don't have a plan B. 

Offline Gamer

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Re: Topic: LISTENING to your anti-prep neighbors
« Reply #11 on: November 15, 2016, 04:18:37 PM »
Like people have said above, hopefully after SHTF we'd be able to put together a team of people with different skills, if we can find any.
The good news is that after a cataclysm that wipes out 99% of the world's population (for example a plague), a surprisingly large number of people will survive.
For example (if I've done my sums right) in a city of 1 million people, the surviving 1% will still number 10,000..:)

Offline Morning Sunshine

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Re: Topic: LISTENING to your anti-prep neighbors
« Reply #12 on: November 15, 2016, 07:01:42 PM »
Like people have said above, hopefully after SHTF we'd be able to put together a team of people with different skills, if we can find any.
The good news is that after a cataclysm that wipes out 99% of the world's population (for example a plague), a surprisingly large number of people will survive.
For example (if I've done my sums right) in a city of 1 million people, the surviving 1% will still number 10,000..:)

that is assuming that every place is effected equally.  If it is highly infectious, I would imagine that a large city would have a lower survival % while an isolated tribe would have a higher.  Or a certain community, say the Amish (since they are geneticists favorite to study) have a genetic anomaly that allows a higher number of survivors.

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Re: Topic: LISTENING to your anti-prep neighbors
« Reply #13 on: February 07, 2017, 04:51:21 PM »
Just a thought for a topic or discussion. We all have those neighbors that are totally against prepping and think we are weird and nothing bad will ever happen (or those neighbors you just don't want to tell that you do for opsec). You don't have to talk to them or convince them, but you should know and listen to them. Little things to log away in your memory. 'Suzy down the block is a nurse'. She doesn't believe in prepping but will when shtf. Now you know who to get for medical skills, and shes likely to trade those skills for the food she doesn't have. Bob is a mechanic and has tools. Mary is a seamstress. Albert and Gloria love to grow a massive vegetable garden. Rick is retired military or police. Lots of people around us have skills that will be handy when the time comes. We just need to listen so we know who and what. We don't need to convince them to prepare, they will be desperate to trade their skills when it means their families survival. So don't stress over talking to your neighbors, but do listen to them.
Hahaha same thing is with my parents. We even lived through a Hurricane (luckily not very much damage to the house) where if were a little less unlikely (like someone's house who's windows blew out and roof caved in a few blocks down) we probably would've died because we are so unprepared. If you assume on a scale of 1-10 how prepped someone is, and assume the average person at a 4 or 5, we were at a 2. We never had any long lasting food, minimal water, no shelter protection. They're not only "If you prepare for anything in any way you are CRAZY" but they actually try to stop me from prepping using my own money LOL. Sure I'm 20, and can technically be independent and junk but I rely on them for college funding. So as far as they know, everything in those 10 or 20 boxes of shit I ordered from amazon that are in the basement could be marshmallows instead of gas masks, sheet lead, and hazmat suits.

Offline TheLastBoyscout

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Re: Topic: LISTENING to your anti-prep neighbors
« Reply #14 on: September 27, 2017, 07:26:40 AM »
Neighbors is one thing but, worse is a family member.  At least I don't live in the same house as my neighbor. 

Offline Applejack

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Re: Topic: LISTENING to your anti-prep neighbors
« Reply #15 on: January 17, 2018, 04:02:08 PM »
I had a neighbor who her husband was into that tin foil hat bull. She came to my house one day wanting me to show her how to store rice and beans. So without warning when she came with all her supplies of canning jars, rice, beans and such. She just said here is everything when you get done bring it all to me. I was like you are kidding me.  Well, I took care of it for her and got it to her but was ready for next time. And yes, there was a next time. Told her I was busy but if she wanted to stay and help then I would be happy to help her and show her how to do it. She stayed but was mad about it. Never had I seen anyone slam food into jars the way she did. That was the last time I helped her. She had no skills so no help to us in a SHTF situation. Sadly though she has since passed away from cancer. She had always been a user of the neighbors but never willing to help out. She was good for volunteering people.

Offline Carl

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Re: Topic: LISTENING to your anti-prep neighbors
« Reply #16 on: January 17, 2018, 04:42:57 PM »
  A sacrificial goat can still be helpful...once.

Offline Smurf Hunter

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Re: Topic: LISTENING to your anti-prep neighbors
« Reply #17 on: January 17, 2018, 05:36:06 PM »
"anti"  feels a lot different from dismissive.  Just as some people roll their eyes when I explain some extra insurance coverage, or upgrade home security system.

Intellectually anyone can imagine a scenario were they are stuck at home for 3-5 days.  It'll vary by region, climate and other factors.  But it has happened to most everyone in their life times.

So get them on board with that mild scenario and build from there.

Offline CagedFeral

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Re: Topic: LISTENING to your anti-prep neighbors
« Reply #18 on: January 20, 2018, 03:31:03 AM »
We had a major ice storm awhile back. The power was out for 6 days here. Temps were hanging at about 8 deg all that week. My old farmer neighbor cross the road and us were the only ones living at home by day 2 on our road. We both have real wood stoves so we were warm as a bug in a rug. I think we showed the benefits of the stove to atleast a couple people that week. I heard alot of people say they had to go stay with so n so.

We did have to take cold showers that week so to tell the truth we were miserable at times too but the stove warmed us right back up. 

Offline Stwood

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Re: Topic: LISTENING to your anti-prep neighbors
« Reply #19 on: January 20, 2018, 10:26:56 PM »
I hear ya on the woodstove. That's our main source of heat, both house and shop.
No electricity involved. Cut our own wood, have our own woodlot.
Have LP backup if we need to leave for a few days. It too needs no electric.

Offline CagedFeral

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Re: Topic: LISTENING to your anti-prep neighbors
« Reply #20 on: January 24, 2018, 04:49:54 AM »
Stwood. I remember how aggravated my wife was over 20 years ago when I put this stove in our new home. She said it's taking too much room! She was not happy with me at first.. These days she says she can't get warm without it. If it drops below 20 she's the first to say "we need a fire!"

Offline Stwood

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Re: Topic: LISTENING to your anti-prep neighbors
« Reply #21 on: January 24, 2018, 07:33:27 AM »
Stwood. I remember how aggravated my wife was over 20 years ago when I put this stove in our new home. She said it's taking too much room! She was not happy with me at first.. These days she says she can't get warm without it. If it drops below 20 she's the first to say "we need a fire!"

I hear ya!!!! :rofl: We can't seem to warm either if the stove isn't fired up

Offline lissa

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Re: Topic: LISTENING to your anti-prep neighbors
« Reply #22 on: March 20, 2018, 01:53:43 AM »
I'm an expert at understanding people, but a complete idiot when it comes to actually dealing with them, lol. I don't use the term "prepper" or "survivalist", not because they are inaccurate, but they conjure the wrong image in the minds of the uninitiated. There are many veiled ways to get people open to the idea.

That new solar or wind system to get you off grid is because you're sick of paying ever-increasing utility rates, or you "want to do something good for the environment", lol.

Growing your own food can be approached from a health perspective with basic nutritional data on commercial vs home grown crops. It can be a hobby, a family tradition, or  to get types of food you can't buy in your area. If you attach the term "prepper" to that activity, people assume you're just hoarding rations in anticipation of the end-times. Some people do that, and your neighbors are right, those people are f*ing nuts. Honing your skills and maintaining a healthy surplus of food will benefit you if you enter the Shit-hits-the-fan scenario, but if you're honest with yourself, that's not the primary reason you would engage in these activities. There are more immediate and assured benefits to cultivating a lifestyle of resiliency. The benefits are not scenario driven.

If someone takes issue with your hunting, flip the PC bullshit around on them "My grandfather is (insert any native culture)... we need to keep our way of life alive through the practice of our traditions. I'm sorry my people's culture offends you". It's the ultimate trump-card for the sycophantic brain-washed far-left suburbanite ideologues. That statement is like kryptonite to their morally righteous self-image, so ram it up their ass the first chance you get and they'll be licking your boots in no time  8) The proper response to passive-aggressive is overt aggression (just in a non-threatening way). Don't worry about what such people think, if you establish yourself as the alpha-dog, they will follow you. Be unrepentant, undeterred, but welcoming.

At the core of your point, you're talking about "community" on a local scale, maybe a few dozen people or families. There's one thing you need to understand when building your own community: people instinctively follow a tribal system. Look at every "primitive" culture in the world, they follow the same structure. There are roles or primal archetypes that people assign themselves when working together, and we recreate these types of organization in modern life.

The basic Archetypes are:
Village Elders - The experienced people with a capacity to lead others.
Warriors - The defense minded.
Hunters - Opportunists in Resource procurement
Farmers - Resource generation.
Craftsmen - Support systems and tradecraft
Home makers - Domestic responsibilities, child rearing
Shaman - Philosophers, teachers, those with wisdom and social objectivity.
Dependants - usually children or the infirmed who have little at this moment to contribute.

It's easy to see how these play out in a true "tribe", but you can probably find their modern-day equivalents in the workplace. There are Managers in an office (the elders), there is security (physical security, information security, lawyers etc) who make up the warrior class. Hunters can be found in sales and acquisitions, looking for opportunities to exploit for resources. The common worker in any office is like a farmer, they toil away to produce some product or service. There are always support people, be they tool makers, technical support etc who devise solutions and improve efficiency making up the craftsmen class. The domestic workers may be a Human Resources department, and the Shaman class is usually the socially isolated but exceptionally proficient person in the office, the one everyone goes to for advice, a trainer, mentor, expert etc.

You can dissect any group of people and reduce it to these basic roles. Every effective group follows this model, be it intentional or not. Look at Jack's "Expert Council" and the vocations of each member. Branches of Government, high school social clicks... Everyone who is useful to society falls into at least one of these categories. These roles also can be extended, quite literally to prepping activities. If you can determine what type of person they are, you can determine what aspects of prepping might appeal to them.

If the guy across the street is a City Councilman, he's a leader and probably doesn't give half a shit about fishing. He may enjoy it as a hobby, but he's not going to see that skill as vital to his survival or as a means of improving the quality of his life. He'd be more valuable in discussions like this one about the community, talking about the police, community gardens and markets. The soccer mom next door will probably love it if you keep a few chickens. She's a homemaker, and feeding the chickens is entertainment for her kids, offers an educational opportunity, and if you share some eggs, it's good nutritious food for her family of a quality she cannot otherwise buy. That activity has multiple levels of appeal to her. Start talking about guns and tactical training however, she'll react very differently. Make your appeal to the primal archetype they most embody, and you will find them receptive.

Now identify the dependants in your area. In modern times, these will often be welfare recipients, the severely disabled, the elderly (some of whom merely have skills which are now obsolete, negating their possible contributions, but age is not an immediate disqualifier). These people have little to contribute. That doesn't mean they should be discounted, their lives have value. However, this is where you'll meet your strongest opposition. Some will be friendly and supportive, some will not. They by definition cannot participate in what you're doing, don't see themselves as the beneficiaries of your efforts, and often have lots of free time to form uneducated opinions about what you're doing, even when it's no concern of theirs. This is the old lady who freaks out because you have a garden instead of a lawn in your own backyard, or calls the police because there's a car parked on the curb and not in your driveway. Every community has one. If yours has more than one who you interact with, pack up and move. They will suck the life out of the community and bring about a state of decay. On the internet, we call these people "trolls" and they delight in killing communities. You need to be rid of them to succeed, but if you take any action against them, you will become the outcast. It's best to passively exclude them and if need-be, move your operations away from their influence.

That's great Idea....!!!!   :)