Author Topic: Need Help - Afraid of Blood and Medical Issues  (Read 12791 times)

endurance

  • Guest
Re: Need Help - Afraid of Blood and Medical Issues
« Reply #30 on: June 28, 2016, 07:58:19 AM »
It was arterial bleeding.  It was negligence of medical people dealing with the tourniquet.  Because he lost his leg over it, he changed his medical specialty to try to keep patients from being hurt/damaged like he was.
Got it. He would have preferred death. Makes perfect sense.

Offline Smurf Hunter

  • Survival Veteran
  • ********
  • Posts: 7172
  • Karma: 334
Re: Need Help - Afraid of Blood and Medical Issues
« Reply #31 on: June 28, 2016, 09:00:45 AM »
We're starting to argue about something that really doesn't matter, at least not very often.
 
Unless you're up on a mountain or some other scenario where medical transport to a full service hospital is more than a couple hours, you're generally not at risk of losing a limb from a TQT.  Disclaimer: I live outside a large metro area, and even places in the woods where we often hike, fish or go shooting are at most 45 minutes by ambulance to a "real"  hospital.  So for my area, EMTs and trainers lean toward more TQT than less in the event of arterial bleeding.

If you are on a mountain ridge is northern A-stan, aboard a fishing boat off the Aleutian Islands, etc. your mileage would vary.

endurance

  • Guest
Re: Need Help - Afraid of Blood and Medical Issues
« Reply #32 on: June 28, 2016, 09:28:17 AM »
We're starting to argue about something that really doesn't matter, at least not very often.
 
Unless you're up on a mountain or some other scenario where medical transport to a full service hospital is more than a couple hours, you're generally not at risk of losing a limb from a TQT.  Disclaimer: I live outside a large metro area, and even places in the woods where we often hike, fish or go shooting are at most 45 minutes by ambulance to a "real"  hospital.  So for my area, EMTs and trainers lean toward more TQT than less in the event of arterial bleeding.

If you are on a mountain ridge is northern A-stan, aboard a fishing boat off the Aleutian Islands, etc. your mileage would vary.
I think you are missing the point. If you have a femoral artery bleed, you can bleed out and die in minutes, not hours. Tourniquets save lives in the city all the time.

http://www.denverpost.com/2015/12/27/denver-health-tourniquet-training-has-saved-cops-lives/

Denver Police rarely work more than 15 minutes from the nearest hospital, but feel it's worth their time to save their own and fellow officer's lives to train. My fire department requires us to carry tourniquets in our bunker gear at all times, not for use on the public, but to use on ourselves and fellow firefighters. And we are rarely more than 30 minutes from a hospital.

most patients who need a tourniquet are at a hospital within two hours and the limb is saved. Some limbs have been saved after eight hours of delay. Regardless, if there is serious arterial bleeding the immediate application of a tourniquet keeps blood in the body and prevents shock. If you wait until the first signs of shock, the probability of survival drops dramatically. You can't simply wait until someone is in shock and then stop the bleeding. It must be stopped immediately to save the patient's life.

They've been used successfully at the Boston Marathon bombing and at the Orlando shooting; neither of which was on a mountain top in Afghanistan. Both of which were within minutes of a hospital, but were crutial to saving lives.

Offline Smurf Hunter

  • Survival Veteran
  • ********
  • Posts: 7172
  • Karma: 334
Re: Need Help - Afraid of Blood and Medical Issues
« Reply #33 on: June 28, 2016, 09:31:17 AM »
I think you are missing the point. If you have a femoral artery bleed, you can bleed out and die in minutes, not hours. Tourniquets save lives in the city all the time.

http://www.denverpost.com/2015/12/27/denver-health-tourniquet-training-has-saved-cops-lives/

Denver Police rarely work more than 15 minutes from the nearest hospital, but feel it's worth their time to save their own and fellow officer's lives to train. My fire department requires us to carry tourniquets in our bunker gear at all times, not for use on the public, but to use on ourselves and fellow firefighters. And we are rarely more than 30 minutes from a hospital.

most patients who need a tourniquet are at a hospital within two hours and the limb is saved. Some limbs have been saved after eight hours of delay. Regardless, if there is serious arterial bleeding the immediate application of a tourniquet keeps blood in the body and prevents shock. If you wait until the first signs of shock, the probability of survival drops dramatically. You can't simply wait until someone is in shock and then stop the bleeding. It must be stopped immediately to save the patient's life.

They've been used successfully at the Boston Marathon bombing and at the Orlando shooting; neither of which was on a mountain top in Afghanistan. Both of which were within minutes of a hospital, but were crutial to saving lives.

We are in agreement and saying the same thing here. 

Offline Chemsoldier

  • Pot Stirrer
  • Global Moderator
  • Survival Veteran
  • ******
  • Posts: 5882
  • Karma: 549
Re: Need Help - Afraid of Blood and Medical Issues
« Reply #34 on: June 28, 2016, 10:41:01 AM »
I would add that even in the mountains of Afghanistan where guys have the TQ on for hours I am not aware of a service member who lost a limb to the TQ that was not already un-salvagable due to trauma.

Is training "needed" well yeah, but the level of training is so easy that with the right information  (I will concede there is some bad info out there) but with the right info you can be good to use them with 10 minutes of training from a video, at least from a safety standpoint.

Offline FreeLancer

  • Global Moderator
  • Survival Veteran
  • ******
  • Posts: 6711
  • Karma: 820
Re: Need Help - Afraid of Blood and Medical Issues
« Reply #35 on: June 28, 2016, 03:19:02 PM »
Not a link but you should be able to find it easily. It was on cable Fox News and a Fox reporter made the film.  The whole program was on medical mistakes and how easily they happen.  The doctor who lost his leg due to a tourniquet is on there.

Is this a situation where the tourniquet was applied in the field by first responders at the time of the injury, to prevent him from bleeding out before he got to the hospital, or in the OR during surgery and someone lost track of how long the cuff had been inflated?  There are significant differences between those two situations, apples and oranges.

Offline RitaRose1945

  • Survival Veteran
  • ********
  • Posts: 5526
  • Karma: 403
  • Asking the uncomfortable questions since 1964
Re: Need Help - Afraid of Blood and Medical Issues
« Reply #36 on: June 29, 2016, 05:50:24 AM »
 :knitting: