Author Topic: Need Help - Afraid of Blood and Medical Issues  (Read 12442 times)

Offline Sephiroth

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Need Help - Afraid of Blood and Medical Issues
« on: May 31, 2016, 06:03:11 AM »
Well, i am an honest person. I always recognize my faults...

And as a prepper, this one is high on the "personal faults" list. Since i had a VERY BAD car accident as a kid, i never again could stand the sight of blood, going to hospitals or dealing with medical issues of any kind. So what to do ?

I know, that as a prepper i have to be able to take care of myself and others should a medical issue appear (minor one). I do know, that we are not Doctors or Paramedics, we need the basics. But how to do that when just the sight of blood or someone convulsing scares you ? How to i apply a tourniquet on someone when i cant get myself to go near the injury ?

Only thing i can think of, is attending a first aid training program and try to toughen up ! But being honest ? Dunno about how good and effective that will be... I am very determined to build my first aid skills, because it is #1 on my list of "Most Important".

So that´s it ! Help will be appreciated !  :D

Offline Mr. Bill

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Re: Need Help - Afraid of Blood and Medical Issues
« Reply #1 on: May 31, 2016, 01:03:00 PM »
That's a difficult one.  I'm inclined to say, find a professional who is experienced with PTSD -- but I wouldn't know how to find someone like that myself, and there seems to be a lot of difference of opinion about how to handle PTSD.

It's a good first step that you've recognized there's a problem you want to fix.  Best of luck to you!

Offline bcksknr

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Re: Need Help - Afraid of Blood and Medical Issues
« Reply #2 on: May 31, 2016, 01:38:05 PM »
     Your problem is not that different, or uncommon from many other conditions that stand in the way of living the life you want. Nothing to be ashamed of and completely "fixable". That being said, I doubt you can just tough it out and overcome this anxiety on your own. I think it will take some counseling and therapy to become comfortable with dealing with the anxiety of first aid events. There are many traumatic events that can trigger fears and phobias in later life. You owe it to yourself to investigate the possibilities of being evaluated by a counselor or psychologist who deals with these types of issues; if for no other reason than being comfortable with maintaining your own good health through regular medical and dental care.

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Re: Need Help - Afraid of Blood and Medical Issues
« Reply #3 on: May 31, 2016, 01:43:15 PM »
My Advanced First Aid instructor from a million years ago had a pretty simple statement, "if it grosses you out you should probably put something on that."  As you said, you're not a doctor, so what you have an obligation to do is to, first, do no harm and prevent further harm, then stop the bleeding. The most effective way is to apply a dressing and apply pressure. The dressing covers up the mess. You really don't have to look into the void and remove every speck of debris; leave that to the doctor or whoever follows up after you.

I suggest not overthinking it and focus on covering up that which grosses you out. Once it's covered up, monitor. If it starts coming through the dressing, add more dressing and apply more pressure. If it's still bleeding through, consider a tourniquet.  But 99% of the time, a single dressing and direct pressure will stop all but arterial bleeding.

Gloves help, detatchment helps. My wife is an ICU nurse and paramedic. She sees the worst of the worst and nothing bothers her... Unless I have a splinter. I'm her kryptonite. She has a hard time detatching from me. As I've worked along side her on the fire department, I've learned to follow her lead and with bad trauma I find myself with a very clinical detatchment; it's like working on a machine rather than a person and it really helps.

Offline FrugalFannie

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Re: Need Help - Afraid of Blood and Medical Issues
« Reply #4 on: May 31, 2016, 02:46:20 PM »
I don't know if you have PTSD or not. I'm not a psychiatrist. But perhaps speaking with one will help you identify ways to deal with your "fear."

I know that there is nothing I wouldn't attempt if myself or a loved ones life depends on it. I am certain that even though I don't like blood I am certain that if I had to apply my own tourniquet or one on a family member, the training would take over. I have reacted like this in many stressful situations. Thankfully first aid training rarely involves real victims. Processing on dummies doesn't have the "burden" of being actual victims bleeding out. If you practice enough your actions will be automatic. Or you will freeze completely. But more likely you will just act according to the situation. There is a whole other set of instincts that kick in when YOU are the one in the position to help.

Offline Sephiroth

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Re: Need Help - Afraid of Blood and Medical Issues
« Reply #5 on: May 31, 2016, 03:23:35 PM »
My Advanced First Aid instructor from a million years ago had a pretty simple statement, "if it grosses you out you should probably put something on that."  As you said, you're not a doctor, so what you have an obligation to do is to, first, do no harm and prevent further harm, then stop the bleeding. The most effective way is to apply a dressing and apply pressure. The dressing covers up the mess. You really don't have to look into the void and remove every speck of debris; leave that to the doctor or whoever follows up after you.

I suggest not overthinking it and focus on covering up that which grosses you out. Once it's covered up, monitor. If it starts coming through the dressing, add more dressing and apply more pressure. If it's still bleeding through, consider a tourniquet.  But 99% of the time, a single dressing and direct pressure will stop all but arterial bleeding.

Gloves help, detatchment helps. My wife is an ICU nurse and paramedic. She sees the worst of the worst and nothing bothers her... Unless I have a splinter. I'm her kryptonite. She has a hard time detatching from me. As I've worked along side her on the fire department, I've learned to follow her lead and with bad trauma I find myself with a very clinical detatchment; it's like working on a machine rather than a person and it really helps.

First off, thanks for all the reply's !

Endurance, you made a major point. "To Cure or to do no harm" i believe is the Medical creed right ?

I think i will start from there. Try to just make a person more comfortable and call/look for help. Maybe, that will already make more prepared as a person... And if i can make it through the program i can build from there !

I always thought that dealing with it directly was the only way to go. But now i believe hat being able to identify whats wrong and make the person (or me) a position to "hold on" while help comes will suffice.  That will already be a milestone from where i am today !

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Re: Need Help - Afraid of Blood and Medical Issues
« Reply #6 on: May 31, 2016, 03:49:25 PM »
As an emergency responder, I'd be impressed with anyone who actually stops and gives a scene size-up rather than the classic cellular hero that drives by and calls 911 and reports an accident. Really?  An accident?  Or did someone just slide off the road and need a tow truck, or are there any injuries, or how many people are hurt, or how serious are the injuries, or in anyone trapped and need extrication....  Since getting back into EMS in the cell phone era, it's a mess compared to 20 years ago. It used to be someone would stop and ask if everyone was alright before driving to the nearest house or pay phone to call 911. Now a car in the ditch with no one around gets a half dozen calls.

What folks don't think about is every time I pull that 28,430 pound fire truck out of the garage and turn on the pretty lights, I'm putting lives at risk; my own and everyone else on the road if things go wrong. I'm also leaving my warm and comfortable bed at 3:00am and I don't get paid a penny either way. I'm happy to help a stranger in need, day or night, rain or shine, but it's really helpful just to know that there are injuries or the people just want to be checked out or there are life-threatening injuries that might require we launch a helicopter. Even the most basic assessment can go a long way to eliciting the right response from the start (do we need one ambulance or two, do we need rescue equipment for extrication or just a blocking vehicle to protect the scene, do we need a paramedic or will an emt be enough).

Offline Sephiroth

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Re: Need Help - Afraid of Blood and Medical Issues
« Reply #7 on: May 31, 2016, 03:59:08 PM »
As an emergency responder, I'd be impressed with anyone who actually stops and gives a scene size-up rather than the classic cellular hero that drives by and calls 911 and reports an accident. Really?  An accident?  Or did someone just slide off the road and need a tow truck, or are there any injuries, or how many people are hurt, or how serious are the injuries, or in anyone trapped and need extrication....  Since getting back into EMS in the cell phone era, it's a mess compared to 20 years ago. It used to be someone would stop and ask if everyone was alright before driving to the nearest house or pay phone to call 911. Now a car in the ditch with no one around gets a half dozen calls.

What folks don't think about is every time I pull that 28,430 pound fire truck out of the garage and turn on the pretty lights, I'm putting lives at risk; my own and everyone else on the road if things go wrong. I'm also leaving my warm and comfortable bed at 3:00am and I don't get paid a penny either way. I'm happy to help a stranger in need, day or night, rain or shine, but it's really helpful just to know that there are injuries or the people just want to be checked out or there are life-threatening injuries that might require we launch a helicopter. Even the most basic assessment can go a long way to eliciting the right response from the start (do we need one ambulance or two, do we need rescue equipment for extrication or just a blocking vehicle to protect the scene, do we need a paramedic or will an emt be enough).

Wow... Never thought of how it goes for you rescue folk...

I called the Police sometimes when i saw a car reck happen (astonishingly common in Brazil)  but never the Fire Department (which handles the nasty ones).

So far from this thread i got the following input:

- Take my time to develop the spine for medical issues
- Just knowing how to identify whats happened and call help goes a very long way
- Stop being an iphone hero !

As always thanks Endurance ! You always give awesome insight !

Offline David in MN

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Re: Need Help - Afraid of Blood and Medical Issues
« Reply #8 on: June 01, 2016, 11:15:06 AM »
I was a lifeguard as a teen and took some EMT training. Basic stuff, I'm no combat medic or anything like that.

I have to admit that I have no stomach for blood. A boxer with a cut is no big deal but I can't stomach some movie violence and any hint of intentional brutality is off my reservation. While traveling Europe I had to close my eyes and do some deep breathing not to pass out in a real Medieval dungeon. That stuff just spooks me out.

That said, the accidents in life I've seen (horrible face burn, compound fractures, muscle tears, severed fingers, punctures, etc.) I just went into mechanical mode and provided first aid as best I could. I can't explain it but in real life the training takes over and I just compartmentalize everything. Maybe I subconsciously know I'm not "choosing" to be there so I make the most of what's in front of me. Later that night I'll have to sit quietly by myself with a big glass of bourbon and process my feelings but in the moment it's just a trained response.

I'd suggest medical training. You might not get over your fears but you might find that you provide value in the moment rather than turning green and passing out. I still struggle to watch gory war films but I know that in person I'm solid. Bottom line, you're not alone. It's actually a common (and understandable) phobia.

Offline Sephiroth

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Re: Need Help - Afraid of Blood and Medical Issues
« Reply #9 on: June 01, 2016, 12:15:47 PM »
I was a lifeguard as a teen and took some EMT training. Basic stuff, I'm no combat medic or anything like that.

I'd suggest medical training. You might not get over your fears but you might find that you provide value in the moment rather than turning green and passing out. I still struggle to watch gory war films but I know that in person I'm solid. Bottom line, you're not alone. It's actually a common (and understandable) phobia.

Hey David,

Thanks for the reply ! As you said, maybe training is the way to go ! I hope it will come out almost on automatic after a while. There is a Red Cross HQ close to were i live, they have an amazing program. So that is my objective !

Offline Smurf Hunter

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Re: Need Help - Afraid of Blood and Medical Issues
« Reply #10 on: June 01, 2016, 12:27:04 PM »
Just last night I took a first aid course at the gun range I volunteer at.  There are some NASTY scenarios that get covered in that course.  For me, knowing that professionals learned how to cope with things like compound fractures, severed arteries, etc. makes me understand it's at possible to do.

I don't "like" blood, or needles, but my son's recent diagnosis of type 1 diabetes has required him to prick his fingers 5+ times each day, and administer almost as many injections of insulin.  If he doesn't do that, he won't live long term.  As much as none of us like that, it quickly became the "new normal" for the whole family.

I think knowing that you CAN handle situations is the key.  I know many people who would absolutely freeze up during an crisis.  I don't need to be an expert, but I want to be able to assess and help out the emergency responders as much as possible when they arrive on scene.

Learn how to assess strokes, heart attacks, etc.

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Re: Need Help - Afraid of Blood and Medical Issues
« Reply #11 on: June 01, 2016, 02:28:50 PM »
Smurf brings up another good point. One reason a lot of people respond to a crisis by freezing up is because the situation is so alien to their experience that they have no script in their mind for the scene. They'll often stand and stare without really registering what is going on. A good first aid class with run multiple scenarios and the more realistic the better. The goal is to give you a script to work from when you see a trauma or medical emergency. With enough repetitions, you develop muscle memory and regardless of the intensity, you respond the same every time, simulation or real.

I was talking on a hike with my Lieutenant last weekend about retention and improving call response. We agreed that it takes about 30 calls before a new recruit really becomes useful on a call for all but the most basic tasks. Before that, they might be able to function as a gofer, hold a stop sign or lift heavy things when pointed in the right direction, but you have to keep an eye on them. They'll walk in front of traffic without looking, they'll watch you work without ever offering to help, they'll get in the way and won't even hear you when you ask them to move. It takes time to be able to focus on the important things and ignore the background chaos that happens on most calls.

The more you can take what you learn and try to teach others, practice and maybe even volunteer to get your hands dirty, the more effective responder you will become when the victim might be someone you love.

Offline Sephiroth

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Re: Need Help - Afraid of Blood and Medical Issues
« Reply #12 on: June 01, 2016, 03:21:30 PM »
Really good point by Smurf !

"Necessity, is the father of invention"

So when you REALLY need it, you do it. Called the Red Cross today and signed in, nut training is only in July ! So i have a month to man up....

Offline Smurf Hunter

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Re: Need Help - Afraid of Blood and Medical Issues
« Reply #13 on: June 01, 2016, 03:24:39 PM »
I was talking on a hike with my Lieutenant last weekend about retention and improving call response. We agreed that it takes about 30 calls before a new recruit really becomes useful on a call for all but the most basic tasks. Before that, they might be able to function as a gofer, hold a stop sign or lift heavy things when pointed in the right direction, but you have to keep an eye on them. They'll walk in front of traffic without looking, they'll watch you work without ever offering to help, they'll get in the way and won't even hear you when you ask them to move.

Ahh - I'm starting to understand what the city emergency manager meant when he said "this radio is so simple, a firefighter could almost use it" (for the record he's a retired fire chief from the neighboring county and you are meant to laugh when you read it)


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Re: Need Help - Afraid of Blood and Medical Issues
« Reply #14 on: June 01, 2016, 03:37:26 PM »
Ahh - I'm starting to understand what the city emergency manager meant when he said "this radio is so simple, a firefighter could almost use it" (for the record he's a retired fire chief from the neighboring county and you are meant to laugh when you read it)
Yup, we joke about firefighter proof and firefighter resistant engineering all the time. Everything is designed to be four year old proof because when the adrenaline is flowing, that's about all the smarts you have.  There's a reason we don't have keys for the fire truck (it's an on/off and start switch), there's a reason the 4:1 rope bag has the pulley already set up, and there's a reason why the hose is preconnected to the truck with the nozzle in the closed position. Without design features like this, we would just be making the scene more chaotic. As it is, I've seen people charge a line that hadn't been deployed yet. Now that's a helluva mess. 150psi in an inch and three quarters line in a confined compartment in the truck. What a mess.

I ran a little more than 120 calls last year between my two departments. It was my third year responding. I still have my moments of unfathomable boneheadedness. Just last week one of our medics with 16 years experience lost her radio on a call. We still haven't found it.

Offline Victoria

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Re: Need Help - Afraid of Blood and Medical Issues
« Reply #15 on: June 24, 2016, 07:42:53 PM »
Well, i am an honest person. I always recognize my faults... And as a prepper, this one is high on the "personal faults" list. Since i had a VERY BAD car accident as a kid, i never again could stand the sight of blood, going to hospitals or dealing with medical issues of any kind. So what to do ?  I know, that as a prepper i have to be able to take care of myself and others should a medical issue appear (minor one). I do know, that we are not Doctors or Paramedics, we need the basics. But how to do that when just the sight of blood or someone convulsing scares you ? How to i apply a tourniquet on someone when i cant get myself to go near the injury ?  Only thing i can think of, is attending a first aid training program and try to toughen up ! But being honest ? Dunno about how good and effective that will be... I am very determined to build my first aid skills, because it is #1 on my list of "Most Important".   So that´s it ! Help will be appreciated !  :D

First, forget about tourniquets, I was an EMT and we don't use them and no one should unless they are an EMT and don't have another way to stop bleeding.  Unless you know exactly what you are doing, you can kill tissue by using a tourniquet.  There is another, better way to stop bleeding.

I was also a Licensed Professional Counselor and Psychological Examiner so let's see if we can lighten your feeling toward blood.   What is blood?  It is red stuff that carries your food, oxygen and elements to cure your body of disease or cuts, to parts of your body - that is what it does.  It is just red stuff.  You have a bunch of it in your body to keep you healthy.

There is something you can slap on a cut that will stop the bleeding in seconds and I just posted that on another thread.  It is Celox and comes in packets.  You can get it on Amazon:

https://www.amazon.com/CELOX-Temporary-Traumatic-Treatment-10-Pack/dp/B0032UY9BQ/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1466811483&sr=8-2&keywords=celox

Now, since you can have these packets to stop bleeding you don't have to worry about bleeding - just put the Celox powder on it and it stops in seconds.  After it stops, put on a bit of triple antibiotic cream (get it at the drug store and keep it where you can find it), then put a clean bandage put on tightly.  There, you stopped the bleeding yourself and was easy to do. 

If the wound requires stitches to close, you can head to your doctor or an emergency room.  [As an EMT, I have a stapler [no, not your regular type stapler :O) ], and could staple the wound closed unless it was a big one. :o) ]

I believe part of your fear may be because when you were hurt you couldn't do anything about it so it scared you .  You had to depend on people you didn't know to help you.  If you prepare yourself to do something, it's always better than not having any knowledge to help yourself - or others. 

Now, since you can stop the bleeding fast with Celox, what else bothers you about wounds or anything medical?

Offline Victoria

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Re: Need Help - Afraid of Blood and Medical Issues
« Reply #16 on: June 24, 2016, 07:56:31 PM »
Well, i am an honest person. I always recognize my faults...

What I wrote was to help you get over the "fear" of seeing blood.  You can stop bleeding by using Celox.  But I should mention bleeding from an artery.  Arteries are deeper in the body so it takes a real blow, punch, or deep cut to cut an artery.  There is a special bandage now that helps stop arterial bleeding but you are likely not to have that.  If an artery is bleeding, call 911 immediately and put massive pressure on the bleeding.

In an emergency situation where there is no medical help available, do not climb up trees or get up on a high place, such as a roof.  Falling from a high place could result in an artery cut.  That is one of my absolutes if no medical help can come fast - DO NOT CLIMB.

Offline FreeLancer

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Re: Need Help - Afraid of Blood and Medical Issues
« Reply #17 on: June 24, 2016, 09:57:42 PM »
It's common for medical students to get woozy, or even pass out and hit the floor, at some point in training.  Observing as a helpless bystander is always worse than having something constructive to do to help in those types of situations, it just takes time and experience to get there.

Even after you've developed a "tolerance" to trauma, you're always susceptible to being adversely affected by it.  Often it's worse for those with more experience, because they (and their comrades) are led to believe they should be immune to those emotions, so they stuff the feelings and try to tough it out.  That doesn't work out well.  Admit you're subject to all the human frailties, just like everyone else, recognize when you're heading to a dark place you can't get out of on your own, and don't be ashamed to ask for help.

Offline Cedar

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Re: Need Help - Afraid of Blood and Medical Issues
« Reply #18 on: June 24, 2016, 10:12:00 PM »
, so they stuff the feelings and try to tough it out. 

Or make horrendous jokes to try to lighten the mood.  :-\

Cedar

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Re: Need Help - Afraid of Blood and Medical Issues
« Reply #19 on: June 25, 2016, 05:24:19 AM »
First, forget about tourniquets, I was an EMT and we don't use them and no one should unless they are an EMT and don't have another way to stop bleeding.  Unless you know exactly what you are doing, you can kill tissue by using a tourniquet.  There is another, better way to stop bleeding.

...
I'd strongly suggest you update your training regarding tourniquets. Times and research have changed and the fear of tissue damage has been replaced by overwhelming research to advocate their use for arterial bleeding.

https://acutecareinc.wordpress.com/2016/06/17/in-wake-of-orlando-shooting-ama-encourages-first-responders-to-learn-tourniquet-use/

Offline FreeLancer

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Re: Need Help - Afraid of Blood and Medical Issues
« Reply #20 on: June 25, 2016, 05:39:53 AM »
Or make horrendous jokes to try to lighten the mood.  :-\

Gallows humor has its place as a coping mechanism. But, as with everything in life, it has its limits, and we need to be mindful that it's not going to work all the time for everyone.

Offline Victoria

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Re: Need Help - Afraid of Blood and Medical Issues
« Reply #21 on: June 25, 2016, 08:03:54 AM »
I'd strongly suggest you update your training regarding tourniquets. Times and research have changed and the fear of tissue damage has been replaced by overwhelming research to advocate their use for arterial bleeding.

https://acutecareinc.wordpress.com/2016/06/17/in-wake-of-orlando-shooting-ama-encourages-first-responders-to-learn-tourniquet-use/

I repeat what I said.  No one should use one unless he/she has been trained to apply one and there is no other way to stop bleeding.  The url you posted is to get training.  There are now special bandages developed by Israel that will stop/slow down arterial bleeding.  I have those bandages.

Offline Victoria

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Re: Need Help - Afraid of Blood and Medical Issues
« Reply #22 on: June 25, 2016, 08:36:51 AM »
I'd strongly suggest you update your training regarding tourniquets. Times and research have changed and the fear of tissue damage has been replaced by overwhelming research to advocate their use for arterial bleeding.

I will have a SOFTT SOF Tourniquet shortly but training is necessary.  The difficulty with one is that blood circulation can be stopped to the rest of the extremity depriving it of blood.  The patient should be transported quickly to prevent damage from that happening.

Offline Smurf Hunter

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Re: Need Help - Afraid of Blood and Medical Issues
« Reply #23 on: June 27, 2016, 11:25:05 AM »
I repeat what I said.  No one should use one unless he/she has been trained to apply one and there is no other way to stop bleeding.  The url you posted is to get training.  There are now special bandages developed by Israel that will stop/slow down arterial bleeding.  I have those bandages.

A few weeks back I took a first aid class, and they said TQTs are now something we all get taught.  Just 2 years ago during CERT training, TQTs were largely discouraged for lay people.

Times and concepts apparently change RAPIDLY in the first aid field.  I've only taken 4 or 5 CPR courses in my adult life, and I swear at least some detail changes each time.

Offline DDJ

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Re: Need Help - Afraid of Blood and Medical Issues
« Reply #24 on: June 27, 2016, 11:27:34 AM »
One other consideration is ask the instructor about the use of prosthetics (movie Magic) in the training class.  I was in a class recently and the "victim" for the final test were very life like including shooting "Red Stuff".  You may want to ease into the training start with a "magic free" class and learn then take a class that is full smoke and mirrors, Sorry I had to stay with the analogy. As stated the more training you have in a controlled and controllable environment the more your training is likely to kick in and then you react to it later.  Also playing the what if game as you go about your life can be a help.

What if game:  As you go about your day ask your self what if questions.  Look at the world around you, notice and observe.  What if there was a car accident right in front of you.  Where would you go to avoid injury to your self.  What would be the response.  Where are you to your gear that is not in your pocket?  What is around that you could use to splint an arm, create a field expedient bandage, put out a fire (where is the closest fire extinguisher to your work space) or deal with the other issues that would come with an accident where you are. 

Visualization of what to do and what to use will make chaos become a plan.  A guy I listen too on another pod cast calls it creating an index card in your mind.  If you have worked through a scenario in your mind, or formal training, you know what to do and you do not freeze up not knowing what to do, you just need to recognize it and then the card opens up.  I can say that this happened to me in a recent training situation.  We had an exercise where someone went down and my reaction was slower than I or the instructor liked, but I felt the internal card file flip tot he correct page and I started to move.  It did take time for the training from 2 years ago to open.  The funny thing is as it happened I felt my brain accessing the index card.  It does work. 

Also stop looking this as something that makes you less of a man.  You do not need to "man up".  We all have fears you have the advantage of knowing what yours is.  The training and visualization will help you learn what to do, but an attitude of confidence can trip you.  That will be your first step.

Offline Victoria

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Re: Need Help - Afraid of Blood and Medical Issues
« Reply #25 on: June 27, 2016, 06:34:58 PM »
A few weeks back I took a first aid class, and they said TQTs are now something we all get taught.  Just 2 years ago during CERT training, TQTs were largely discouraged for lay people.

Times and concepts apparently change RAPIDLY in the first aid field.  I've only taken 4 or 5 CPR courses in my adult life, and I swear at least some detail changes each time.

I saw a program last night about medical mistakes (some through accident, some through ignorance) killing or maiming people.  There was an MD doctor who broke his leg and a tourniquet was placed on his upper thigh.  He trusted medical people when he should not have - the tourniquet was not removed soon enough and later his leg below the thigh died and had to be removed due to the tourniquet staying on there too long.

It is okay for non-medical people to give medical care (more than antibiotic cream on a minor cut and slapping a kiddie picture band aid on it), but it is not okay for them to do it without extensive training.   I have lived long enough (83 yrs.) dealing with treating medical issues and dealing with hospitals to see/witness myself problems that can come up in medical settings and at home treatment.

Someone giving you medical care having just enough medical information but lacking a vital part of it, can kill you.  Anyone treated by someone without proper training, should be taken as quickly as possible to a medical facility so if an vital error has happened, it can be corrected in time to save a life.

I never assume I know it all.  I have written medical articles on the Women's Survival Section on this website, "After Years of Prepping and Still Going, Victoria".  I have a medical bag just for saving lives and a different first aid bag.  Those bags are not the same and they are explained in that article.

Offline FreeLancer

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Re: Need Help - Afraid of Blood and Medical Issues
« Reply #26 on: June 27, 2016, 07:39:17 PM »
I saw a program last night about medical mistakes (some through accident, some through ignorance) killing or maiming people.  There was an MD doctor who broke his leg and a tourniquet was placed on his upper thigh.  He trusted medical people when he should not have - the tourniquet was not removed soon enough and later his leg below the thigh died and had to be removed due to the tourniquet staying on there too long.

Got a link to the program?


The thing about medicine is that (at least ideally, and as far as possible) it's evidence driven, which means that recommendations change as new data impacts our understanding of the risks and benefits of various treatments. Like the shifts in CPR and ACLS protocols in the last decade, the changes in preventive screening recommendations, so too with tourniquet use.  The risks are outweighed by the benefits, and we have 15 years of military data to support that change in recommendation.

Offline Victoria

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Re: Need Help - Afraid of Blood and Medical Issues
« Reply #27 on: June 27, 2016, 08:23:51 PM »
Got a link to the program?

Not a link but you should be able to find it easily. It was on cable Fox News and a Fox reporter made the film.  The whole program was on medical mistakes and how easily they happen.  The doctor who lost his leg due to a tourniquet is on there. There was a another doctor there, Dr. Marty Makary, who recently wrote the book you see below and I ordered it immediately from Amazon, $13.38, paperback.  Cheaper than that for Kindle.

"Unaccountable: What Hospitals Won't Tell You and How Transparency Can Revolutionize Health Care"
Sold by: Amazon.com LLC
$13.38

I keep up with changes in emergency medical care.

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Re: Need Help - Afraid of Blood and Medical Issues
« Reply #28 on: June 27, 2016, 08:56:27 PM »
I saw a program last night about medical mistakes (some through accident, some through ignorance) killing or maiming people.  There was an MD doctor who broke his leg and a tourniquet was placed on his upper thigh.  He trusted medical people when he should not have - the tourniquet was not removed soon enough and later his leg below the thigh died and had to be removed due to the tourniquet staying on there too long.
...
I'm curious if they covered what would have happened if they had not applied a tourniquet?  In general, if treatment took so long that he would have lost his leg, he would have lost more than his leg without the tourniquet.  Of course, you don't apply a tourniquet unless you have severe arterial bleeding, but if he didn't have severe arterial bleeding, why would a doctor allow anyone to apply a tourniquet on him in the first place?

Offline Victoria

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Re: Need Help - Afraid of Blood and Medical Issues
« Reply #29 on: June 27, 2016, 09:53:14 PM »
I'm curious if they covered what would have happened if they had not applied a tourniquet?  In general, if treatment took so long that he would have lost his leg, he would have lost more than his leg without the tourniquet.  Of course, you don't apply a tourniquet unless you have severe arterial bleeding, but if he didn't have severe arterial bleeding, why would a doctor allow anyone to apply a tourniquet on him in the first place?

It was arterial bleeding.  It was negligence of medical people dealing with the tourniquet.  Because he lost his leg over it, he changed his medical specialty to try to keep patients from being hurt/damaged like he was.