Author Topic: shitake logs plan of attack going forward  (Read 20553 times)

Offline oktheniknow

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Re: shitake logs plan of attack going forward
« Reply #30 on: June 20, 2014, 09:07:10 PM »
Thump?

I cut a 3' tall hickory stump today. Thought about using it for oyster mushroom spawn down by the river. Have heard that oyster is more heat tolerant for our Texas summers.

Offline Cedar

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Re: shitake logs plan of attack going forward
« Reply #31 on: June 20, 2014, 09:16:02 PM »
A tree/limb falls.. and it goes THUMP when it hits the ground. THUMPING your logs triggers the mycelium...

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Offline surfivor

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Re: shitake logs plan of attack going forward
« Reply #32 on: September 05, 2014, 01:28:56 AM »
"Soaking a log in a muddy stream that drains out of a swamp seemed like an idea, but I think there could be other fungi in that kind of situation."
That's what I'm going to try, and will start ones that are more likely to take hot weather. Am near a limestone riverbed with a spring. How has your experience been with the placement of these?

 It occurs to me that Sepp Holzer advocates burrying logs standing up in dirt. If he can do that, I am not sure that soaking the logs would be such a problem in muddy water. On the other hand, some people don't advocate burying logs in the ground either. I have some sink holes and other depressions on my land where large pools of water form in the spring. I may try soaking logs in those, some of them are a little muddy or full of leaves and such.

 I am having this problem of some logs in certain areas where the bark starts to peel off. That seems to possibly be a sign that the log is drying out ? One spot is behind my shed where there is a lot of shade, but it's possible it may get a little sun there in mid summer for an hour or so in the afternoon. This  woman told me I could put burlap over the logs. I did do that for some of the time, but I took the burlap off to look at the logs and didn't put it back and despite that the bark still started to peel. This happened on some logs that had the notch in them to absorb water from rains. Clearly the notches did help get moisture into the logs when it rained, but I don't think it distributed throughout the log enough to prevent the bark from peeling. The bark is peeling on certain parts of the log and not others. Those logs are at my house in Mass. I have alot of logs in Maine and it seems cooler and more wet there and the logs don't seem to have so much of the peeling problem, but I still have logs up there that never produced anything, though I was encouraged that a few logs did produce mushrooms. I had a log that started to get some kind of black fungus, so I seperated it from the other logs. I had some oyster mushroom logs that had a white some other type of fungus on poplar and I threw those away from the pile. The oyster logs haven't produced either, except I did see one single tiny oyster mushroom last spring.

 The next time I do a bunch of logs, I am going to do it in the spring which Sepp Holzer said is the best time. I have been told that you can do logs in the winter and fall or anytime of year except mid summer, but I feel I should make a special attempt to do this in the spring.

 I also feel that if you end up with alot of logs in the long run, then soaking them all maybe too much work and I could only soak a few. Moving all these logs around can be alot of work and even cause back strain. I think moving a few is not a problem, but too many becomes impractical.

Offline surfivor

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Re: shitake logs plan of attack going forward
« Reply #33 on: August 01, 2016, 07:39:32 AM »
I hadn't seen any mushrooms for awhile on these logs and it's been the driest hottest summer in New England that I can recall. There was some rain up in Maine a while back though where some of my logs are

 I was surprised that I had some shiitakes on these logs inoculated in April around 2011:






 Then I went back in the woods and found more flushes of shiitake such that I picked a big bag full. Alot where dried out or the cap had opened but I cooked some of the choicer ones and they where quite good. Only about 15% of my logs produced anything .. What surprised me the most though is you can see from the previous posts I inoculated most of these other logs in the middle of winter. I read in some books and other places since then that this was a bad idea so I was surprised I got anything at all. The ones that did best where in heavy shade in areas where there was fir and conifers. This at least makes me feel like I could inoculate in late March or very early April even though there may still be some freezing weather. I think I could leave some logs in the yurt inoculated in March and while it gets cold in there, it can heat up more in the day with the skylight and all


Offline surfivor

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Re: shitake logs plan of attack going forward
« Reply #34 on: August 01, 2016, 07:43:47 AM »
Image links not working ?




Offline Cedar

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Re: shitake logs plan of attack going forward
« Reply #35 on: August 01, 2016, 09:14:12 AM »
Not working. If going to a place to soak the logs 24 hrs coming into Autumn, you ought to get a couple flushes. Remember however thick you log is, should equal how many years you will get out of it. Two inch log equals two years, six inch log equals six years.

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Offline surfivor

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Re: shitake logs plan of attack going forward
« Reply #36 on: August 01, 2016, 09:49:36 AM »
Got the image to work ..
These where from the logs that where inoculated in April 2011 and where just fruiting this weekend except some of the mushrooms seemed to fruit and then dry out.

I got some bigger shiitake from other wood piles in the back of my 11 acres but I just figured out they where fruiting before I left and didn't have time to take a
picture. I had given up on them because I had read inoculating in the middle of the winter when there is 3 feet of snow is not a good idea but I didn't know that at the time. Despite that though, I did get some mushrooms