Author Topic: Mental prep and building medical skills: become an EMT  (Read 18836 times)

Offline Asclepius

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Re: Mental prep and building medical skills: become an EMT
« Reply #30 on: December 05, 2009, 11:42:54 PM »
Ok if you want to be able to make a difference then you need to be a medic. A basic does not start lines on people, do chest decompressions, push med's or do  any other advance procedures. A basic learns how to bandage and splint and immobilize a patient. I know all of this because I was one before going on to medic school. I also teach wilderness first aid and there are different levels of this training also. Any training is better than none, but keep it real.

I mostly agree, but I rely on my basics to do compressions and bag while I'm setting up the line and the tube, so I wouldn't write them off entirely. I do, however, agree that many lay people get too fixated on IV's and advanced procedures while they don't understand the anatomy, sterility, supporting knowledge, and hundreds of hours of practice involved along with regular maintenance of those skills to become proficient.

You can't just store seeds and expect to become a farmer when SHTF. It's a little more complicated than that.

Offline Asclepius

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Re: Mental prep and building medical skills: become an EMT
« Reply #31 on: December 05, 2009, 11:48:25 PM »
Rereading this thread made me think of another possible perk of being an EMT/First Responder. And that is - are you privy to all sorts of info that the Feds hand out, just not to the sheeple? Does being a FR actually gain you access to not public knowledge of risk assessments, strategies, tactical ops, etc.?

I got a swine flu vaccine before it was available to the public because I am a paramedic.

I also suspect that I would have more information available to me than the public in the event of a disaster. In most disasters I've worked I've been very well cared for as well, since I was stuck helping others and didn't necessarily have time to cook for myself or build shelters, etc. As for as risk assessments, that stuff is usually public record.

Offline Asclepius

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Re: Mental prep and building medical skills: become an EMT
« Reply #32 on: December 05, 2009, 11:49:51 PM »
If anyone is interested there are several EMS related podcasts available on iTunes.  They range from the basic to the advanced & from broad topics to specific topics like PHTLS & EMS pharmacology.

www.medpod101.com is one of my favorites

Offline Asclepius

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Re: Mental prep and building medical skills: become an EMT
« Reply #33 on: December 05, 2009, 11:51:20 PM »
I originally posted this in the peer review/intro thread - this one's old as dirt, but maybe someone's still monitoring replies?

Here goes a re-post since it seems to be pertinent to stress-management in the whole EMT line of work...

I've never had a huge monster blow-out style trauma situation to deal with, but I have had plenty of run ins with knives and a few track and field injuries, and handled myself quite well and quite calmly. Further, I can think of about 20 odd situations where I was the only non-dumbfounded fellow about that could tend to someone having a seizure, blackout, diabetic issue, or even a somewhat significant bleeding injury.

For those of you who may have been through an unexpected medical SHTF scenario, to include combat field medicine, how likely are my past experiences with somewhat less pucker inducing conditions to translate into a real SHTF situation where someone's life is literally in my hands? Is that weird zone of silence that falls and blocks out the blathering idiots beside me going to be there just like it always has and allow me to properly position the seizing patient and direct those around me to keep her from smacking herself silly on the concrete? What may or may not make that "zone" go away, and how do I learn to induce it at will, or at least make damn sure it comes in when I need it?

I would hesitate to chalk it up to all the little medical mishaps that I've had to deal with while taking care of my grandmother, since my first experience with this sort of response was in 5th grade when a friend had a seizure. She was undergoing chemotherapy and radiation for a brain tumor, so I had read up on it a bit and talked with her about what happens and what to do. When it happened I just did what we'd talked about, not even thinking about what I was doing all that much. The teacher seemed to need a change of pants, and everyone that wasn't helping me just sorta stood there staring at me like I was an alien or something.

That situation has never really left me, but it's always left me baffled that, first, I was calm in the situation, and second, that nobody else was.

*shrugs*

Thanks in advance for the input,
Orion

All of your previous experiences help you to be less of a mess when SHTF.

Offline Altered Mental Status

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Re: Mental prep and building medical skills: become an EMT
« Reply #34 on: December 06, 2009, 12:30:42 PM »
I mostly agree, but I rely on my basics to do compressions and bag while I'm setting up the line and the tube, so I wouldn't write them off entirely. I do, however, agree that many lay people get too fixated on IV's and advanced procedures while they don't understand the anatomy, sterility, supporting knowledge, and hundreds of hours of practice involved along with regular maintenance of those skills to become proficient.

You can't just store seeds and expect to become a farmer when SHTF. It's a little more complicated than that.
My basics do compressions also and bag. "I said needle de-copmressions" not compressions.... Basics do have a place but it's not doing advanced procedures

Offline Asclepius

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Re: Mental prep and building medical skills: become an EMT
« Reply #35 on: December 07, 2009, 12:26:41 PM »
I see now...

AC

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Re: Mental prep and building medical skills: become an EMT
« Reply #36 on: January 17, 2010, 01:52:10 PM »
I just plain got the swine flu because I'm hardcore OOHRAH-cough!

OK, levity aside, I'm a First Responder, my EMT-B class starts in a few weeks, and I'm going to become a Paramedic if at all possible.

I live on far, far, less than minimum wage.

I am not assuming I'll make money as an EMT or later as medic. I hope there will still be paying jobs around, maybe I'll even land one. I assume a distinct possibility that I'll end up volunteering to keep certified, and paying for school (I have a private loan source but I do have to pay it back!) by washing cars, playing my ukulele for tips, working in home-care under the table, starting a bathroom-cleaning service (sparkling lemony-fresh bathrooms!) or anything I can get.

Minimum wage or near it does not scare me, it'd be riches to me. It's a stance hard to maintain when one has been doing it 20 years and has a family to support, but I myself am not going into this for the money.

I wish I'd never heard of a Zener diode; for low pay nothing beats electronics technician. Go into that and you will experience a lifetime depression of income that's only comparable with being a career fruit picker. You'll get less respect and less vitamin C and carotenes.

There's a site called the Student Doctor's Network, they have a hilarious thread called "Things I Learn From My Patients" that has a lot of EMT/medic input. Wow.


Offline Orionblade

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Re: Mental prep and building medical skills: become an EMT
« Reply #37 on: February 05, 2010, 01:49:10 AM »
About the basics - I learned lab technique a long time ago. I found that practicing in the kitchen isn't half bad.

I also found that when I do a dressing change in front of  the nurse supervisor that comes out once a month to check up on my grandmother, I get funny looks like "why's he doing all THAT?".

It's like I snapped my fingers and a wooly mammoth popped out of the closet doing a Charlie Chaplin routine in a top hat and tails.

Any of the skills you learn, you have to keep up and practice with. Some of them are pretty set once you get 'em, you just need to do them maybe every six to eighteen months to stay on top of proper technique - the things that never go away, but might get rusty. Other things you need to do daily/weekly/monthly to be able to do properly. Example: I aced the hell out of organic chemistry lecture two years ago.

I couldn't tell you what the hell a Diels Alder reaction was to save my life, other than it has something to do with a basic synthesis reaction, and I think it's self catalytic. EVERYONE in first semester organic chemistry can tell you all about it, though. Half of them can probbably tell you who the hell Diels and Alder were, too.


AC

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Re: Mental prep and building medical skills: become an EMT
« Reply #38 on: February 05, 2010, 11:39:26 PM »
you only make maybe $30k a year once you get your cert.


"only" 10X what I make now, lol it's not about the money but that $30K is a lot of money to a lot of people, including me.

Sadly, yes, CPR saves lives but not as many as you'd think. 10% is REALLY good apparently. I wonder if we "civilians" can buy AED's to keep in our cars etc? (Like I'll ever be able to afford to feed a car again, but you get the idea).

Son_of_the_Republic

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Re: Mental prep and building medical skills: become an EMT
« Reply #39 on: February 06, 2010, 02:16:32 PM »
I was very keen to embark on an EMT Basic course ,unfortunatley they have strict vaccine requirments as a requisite for doing such courses and as I have major ethical and medical issues with vaccines I was prevented from going forward.I'm currently looking for an advanced first aid/wilderness first course instead.

Offline Asclepius

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Re: Mental prep and building medical skills: become an EMT
« Reply #40 on: February 08, 2010, 02:56:01 PM »
I was very keen to embark on an EMT Basic course ,unfortunatley they have strict vaccine requirments as a requisite for doing such courses and as I have major ethical and medical issues with vaccines I was prevented from going forward.I'm currently looking for an advanced first aid/wilderness first course instead.

Did you check with different colleges about their vaccine requirements?

Son_of_the_Republic

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Re: Mental prep and building medical skills: become an EMT
« Reply #41 on: February 09, 2010, 01:33:17 PM »
Yep,all the local EMT courses required submiting to be shot up with multiple vaccines.

medicineman84

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Re: Mental prep and building medical skills: become an EMT
« Reply #42 on: February 09, 2010, 02:21:32 PM »
I was very keen to embark on an EMT Basic course ,unfortunatley they have strict vaccine requirments as a requisite for doing such courses and as I have major ethical and medical issues with vaccines I was prevented from going forward.I'm currently looking for an advanced first aid/wilderness first course instead.

What kind of ethical issues are there surrounding vaccines? most of the healthcare jobs, and thus the training programs, I have seen have strict vaccination policies for your safety and the patients you will encounter.

Offline Asclepius

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Re: Mental prep and building medical skills: become an EMT
« Reply #43 on: February 09, 2010, 06:05:42 PM »
I can understand his point if you look at it from the viewpoint of freedom from from unnecessary controls. I mean, vaccines are wise to have when you work around sick people all the time, so why do you need to make rules requiring me to make wise decisions? You're not my f****** mom. Get out of my life.

But really, my vaccines bring me a little peace of mind when I'm around sick, nasty people everyday. But only a little.
« Last Edit: February 09, 2010, 06:07:58 PM by Asclepius »

Son_of_the_Republic

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Re: Mental prep and building medical skills: become an EMT
« Reply #44 on: February 10, 2010, 10:32:22 AM »
What kind of ethical issues are there surrounding vaccines? most of the healthcare jobs, and thus the training programs, I have seen have strict vaccination policies for your safety and the patients you will encounter.

Many vaccines have been cultured using the cells of aborted human babies (human diploid cells) .I think that qualifies for ethical status in terms of my concerns.There are other issues as well not least the act of subservience and submission,that taking shots often entails regardless of ones desire to be medicated or not.And then there is the dubious science underpining vaccines and the cherry on the "issue" cake is the myriad toxic fillers that more often than not are therein contained.1 vaccine will often contain more than 10 times the EPA recommended safe level of Aluminum for example.

P.s. I simply don't believe,based on years of personal research,that vaccines provide any safety of any sort what so ever.In fact science has shown clearly that vaccine programmes don't actually prevent the spread of disease and the fact of having anti-bodies has been empiraclly demonstrated not to have any efficacy in terms of immune response.It's a con in other words,a rather lucrative one too.

vaccination stats here:

http://www.whale.to/m/statistics.html

« Last Edit: February 10, 2010, 10:37:47 AM by Son_of_the_Republic »

Son_of_the_Republic

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Re: Mental prep and building medical skills: become an EMT
« Reply #45 on: February 10, 2010, 10:39:15 AM »
.

But really, my vaccines bring me a little peace of mind when I'm around sick, nasty people everyday. But only a little.

You may find this interesting:

  http://www.whale.to/v/disease2.html

Offline Orionblade

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Re: Mental prep and building medical skills: become an EMT
« Reply #46 on: February 10, 2010, 01:53:37 PM »
A vaccine simply shifts you automatically into a secondary response to a pathogen. I.e. as soon as you get exposed to the pathogen that you've been vaccinated to, you automatically mobilize your immune cells to kill it, instead of waiting for a few cells to be infected, rupture, signal your immune system, then wait for the signal pathway to complete activation of the rest of the immune system, and THEN generate a secondary response.

it just makes things happen faster, it doesn't prevent you from getting the disease (completely), or from spreading it to other people.

As a public health agency, they should be concerned about spreading disease to others, not protecting the EMT's from disease.

Example - europeans were vaccinated (due to prior infection) against smallpox/etc.

Europeans said "hi" to native americans.

Native americans died in droves.

it's kind of like a bullet proof vest - doesn't keep you from getting shot, just keeps the bullet from going all the way through.

Most of the time.

Offline Imperial Goat

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Re: Mental prep and building medical skills: become an EMT
« Reply #47 on: February 10, 2010, 04:27:45 PM »
I was an EMT for a few years back in the early 90's.  Had to drop out of the class midway through the first time when I got activated of r Desert Storm.  On my gun section we had 3 or 4 EMTs and trusted each other more than we did our platoon's corpsman.  Took the full EMT course after I got back and was with a volunteer rescue squad for about two years.

A lot of what we got taught back then (it may be different now) was good basic first aid, with the added bonus of learning to use equipment like a femoral traction splint, inflatable pants for traction or shock, basket gurneys (the names of these things escape me now).  We could not use a defribulator, as that was a separate EMT-D class.  There was also the more advanced EMT-C which was a Cardiac Tech, usually reserved for more rural counties.  THen, paramedic.

I enjoyed it, learned some things, helped some people, found out my barber was a coke addict when he OD'd. 

I have friends who have been volunteer EMTs and paramedics for 15-20 years, having regular jobs that don't involve that, but one 12 hour shift a week, every week, they are at the rescue squad.  Real dedication and committment.

Son_of_the_Republic

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Re: Mental prep and building medical skills: become an EMT
« Reply #48 on: February 10, 2010, 05:45:27 PM »
.

Example - europeans were vaccinated (due to prior infection) against smallpox/etc.

Europeans said "hi" to native americans.

Native americans died in droves.

Nice misuse of terms there.Europeans were NOT vaccinated against disease,they had in fact,over many many generations developed immunity to many illness's.There is a major patholgical difference here.It was mostly as a result of plague after plague,attributed to the widespread domestication of animals, that caused this state affairs in Europe.Most Europeans caught and developed immunity as children.It is no coincidence that Native American adults suffered more from these introduced diseases just as Adults do today.

Native Americans also descended from a much much smaller gene pool .The immune system thrives on variety. The greater the variety in the immune system, the greater number of microbes it can recognize and therefore destroy.Europeans had a major advantage here.

Vaccinations would not helped the N.Americans just as the WHOs smallpox programmes didnt help the populations of India.Your analogy is not scientific and does not stand scrutiny.It was over simplistic also.
« Last Edit: February 10, 2010, 05:50:03 PM by Son_of_the_Republic »

Offline Orionblade

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Re: Mental prep and building medical skills: become an EMT
« Reply #49 on: February 11, 2010, 03:34:59 AM »
A vaccine simply shifts you automatically into a secondary response to a pathogen. I.e. as soon as you get exposed to the pathogen that you've been vaccinated to, you automatically mobilize your immune cells to kill it, instead of waiting for a few cells to be infected, rupture, signal your immune system, then wait for the signal pathway to complete activation of the rest of the immune system, and THEN generate a secondary response.

it just makes things happen faster, it doesn't prevent you from getting the disease (completely), or from spreading it to other people.

And that part was incorrect as well?

Son_of_the_Republic

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Re: Mental prep and building medical skills: become an EMT
« Reply #50 on: February 11, 2010, 07:20:33 AM »
Yes,

Son_of_the_Republic

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Re: Mental prep and building medical skills: become an EMT
« Reply #51 on: February 11, 2010, 07:32:17 AM »
And that part was incorrect as well?

Yes,I really don't know how much more simply I can I say this.Vaccines are designed (but don't do a very good job) to create an immune response and anitbodies to a particular illness.Having antibodies,science tells us,does NOT prevent us from becoming ill.Here is another fallacy of vaccintion,that they prevent illness.They don't,they actually give you a supposedly minor (attenuated) version of the disease.

The manner in which vaccines by-pass our outer immune defense's,ie,skin,mucous membranes (these are medically considered part of our immune defense) etc, is also a problem according to many doctors and scientists.In laymans then,the immune response from vaccination is of an unnatural and probably uselss variety.

Dr Mercola has this to say:

Quote
Vaccines, all vaccines, are immune suppressing; that is they depress our immune functions. The chemicals in the vaccines depress our immune system; the virus present depresses immune function, and the foreign DNA/RNA from animal tissues depresses immunity. Toraldo, et al found that the chemotaxis and metabolic function of PMNs (polymorphonuclear neutrophils) was significantly reduced after vaccinations were given and did not return to normal for months. Other indicators of immune system depression included reduced lymphocyte viability, neutrophil hyper-segmentation

The good Dr goes on...

 
Quote
Vaccinations reduce our immunity in many important ways:

1) Vaccines contain many chemicals and heavy metals, like mercury and aluminum, which are in-themselves immuno-suppressing. Mercury actually causes changes in the lymphocyte activity and decreases lymphocyte viability.

2) Vaccines contain foreign tissues and foreign DNA/RNA which act to suppress the immune system via graft-vs-host rejection phenomena.

3) Vaccines alter our t-cell helper/suppressor ratios ... just like those seen with AIDS. This ratio is a key indicator of a proper functioning immune system.

4) Vaccines alter the metabolic activity of PMNs and reduce their chemotaxic abilities. PMNs are our body's defenses against pathogenic bacteria and viruses.

5) Vaccines suppress our immunity merely buy over-taxing our immune system with foreign material, heavy metals, pathogens and viruses. The heavy metals slow down our immune system, while the viruses set up shop to grow and divide. It is like being chained and handcuffed before swimming.

6) Vaccines clog our lymphatic system and lymph nodes with large protein molecules which have not been adequately broken down by our digestive processes, since vaccines by pass digestion with injections. This is why vaccines are linked to allergies, because they contain large proteins which as circulating immune complexes (CICs) or "klinkers" which cause our body to become allergic.

7) Vaccines deplete our body of vital immune-enhancing nutrients, like vitamin C, A and zinc, which are needed for a strong immune system. It is nutrients like these that primes our immune system, feeds the white blood cells and macrophages and allows them to function optimally.

8) Vaccines are neurotoxic and slow the level of nervous transmission, and communications to the brain and other tissues. Now we know that some lymphocytes communicate directly with the brain through a complex set of neurotransmitters. Altering these factors will also depress our immunity.

http://www.mercola.com/article/vaccines/immune_suppression.htm



« Last Edit: February 11, 2010, 07:38:09 AM by Son_of_the_Republic »

Son_of_the_Republic

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Re: Mental prep and building medical skills: become an EMT
« Reply #52 on: February 11, 2010, 07:36:18 AM »
A timely article from the Health Ranger.Helps to underscore my point that vaccine programmes don't really work:

Mumps outbreak spreads among people who got vaccinated against mumps


Quote
In Ocean County, New Jersey, county spokeswoman Leslie Terjesen told CNN that 77 percent of those who caught mumps had already been vaccinated against mumps.

http://www.naturalnews.com/028142_mumps_vaccines.html

walker

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Re: Mental prep and building medical skills: become an EMT
« Reply #53 on: February 11, 2010, 09:32:32 AM »
Another great skill gained from experience as an EMT/Medic is the ability to develop a finely tuned BS meter.  There are distinct differences between wisdom and knowledge gained from experience that may save you or your family vs. blindly following information from charlatans feeding you bad information based upon rumor and false suppositions.  As an EMT you also come into contact with a variety of people you may not otherwise in your daily life.  You quickly learn an innate sense of when you are being lied to, when someone has underlying motives, and when they have some "agenda" that may end up hurting themselves or others. 

This is no different than when I go to an auto shop and they tell me "you need new ball joints".  Or the various products sold to make my auto more "fuel efficient" or "last longer".  I don't know enough mechanics to dispute their ideas, but I do have a good BS meter, and access to trusted mechanic professionals who can lead me in the right direction.

Yes, my BS meter is pinging.... watch your six.

Regards,
« Last Edit: May 01, 2013, 12:32:27 AM by Archer »

Son_of_the_Republic

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Re: Mental prep and building medical skills: become an EMT
« Reply #54 on: February 11, 2010, 09:51:58 AM »


Yes, my BS meter is pinging.... watch your six.

Regards,

Walker

If this is directed at me you can take your "BS meter" (this is supposed to convey authority?) and stick it were the Sun don't shine.If you think I have an "Agenda" you would be correct.It's called getting the facts out there and helping people to make decisions based on actualites rather than fear and ignorance.So,your EMT training has turned you into some sort of psychic super hero?.....Tell us more cowboy.
« Last Edit: February 11, 2010, 09:54:32 AM by Son_of_the_Republic »

Offline Orionblade

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Re: Mental prep and building medical skills: become an EMT
« Reply #55 on: February 11, 2010, 03:52:36 PM »
Whether vaccines are effective for non-blood-circulating pathogens is a different question than whether or not vaccination and prior exposure are effective at limiting the extent, duration, morbidity, and mortality of a given infection.

I could vaccinate you for herpes, and it would do absolutely no good whatsoever (assuming you dont' have a cervix, and even then I question it's benefits) since it mimics neurotransmitters and migrates and propagates WITHIN nerve tissue, more specifically via axons. hence, you get cold sores when you're stressed, etc. - increased neural activity related to the stress has something to do with triggering the buggers to replicate, thus surfacing and causing inflammation. You only have an immune response to the virus when it's outside the nerve cells - no way to coax it out, either.

To apply that logic universally, however, to vaccines for viruses that DO have direct contact with the circulatory system, macrophages, et. al., is equally fallicious as saying that all vaccines are godsends given us by a caring and benevolent government.

Offline Orionblade

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Re: Mental prep and building medical skills: become an EMT
« Reply #56 on: February 11, 2010, 03:57:37 PM »
one quick rant:

I am an intelligent, independent, thoroughly informed individual. I'm here to share information. that means GIVE and RECIEVE. It's about logical, rational discussion, right?

I'm not setting up a fully complimented lab because I like the way Erlenmyer flasks catch the light from my south-facing windows.

I will, however, promptly cease contributing any medical or scientific information whatsoever on the forum if anyone jumps in and turns one of my posts into the beginnings of a flame war. We should honestly be above this sort of thing, especially when talking about a subject that is supposedly grounded in logic and reasoning, rather than emotion.

Further, inflammatory responses to inflammatory posts do nothing but contaminate a thread further. If youv'e got to be an ass, do so in a PM - I do my best not to disrespect anyone else on the forum.

Offline Serellan

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Re: Mental prep and building medical skills: become an EMT
« Reply #57 on: February 11, 2010, 04:02:19 PM »
Keep it civil, folks.  One and only warning.

Son_of_the_Republic

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Re: Mental prep and building medical skills: become an EMT
« Reply #58 on: February 11, 2010, 04:45:07 PM »
one quick rant:

I am an intelligent, independent, thoroughly informed individual. I'm here to share information. that means GIVE and RECIEVE. It's about logical, rational discussion, right?

I'm not setting up a fully complimented lab because I like the way Erlenmyer flasks catch the light from my south-facing windows.

I will, however, promptly cease contributing any medical or scientific information whatsoever on the forum if anyone jumps in and turns one of my posts into the beginnings of a flame war. We should honestly be above this sort of thing, especially when talking about a subject that is supposedly grounded in logic and reasoning, rather than emotion.

Further, inflammatory responses to inflammatory posts do nothing but contaminate a thread further. If youv'e got to be an ass, do so in a PM - I do my best not to disrespect anyone else on the forum.

I'm sorry you feel inflamed but looking back over my own replies to you,I fail to see how this could be the case.I simply pointed out some logical fallacies and posted links to actual research and medical opinion.If this a problem for you,well I am happy to leave it there and know not to waste my time in future.Time managment simply prevents me from couching my postings in sweet nothings and ego massages.Maybe this appears a little blunt or insensitive?

The only person on here I see itching for a "war" is this Walker individual.This issue too important to waste time name calling.Im sorry I replied to this particular individuals vapid posturing.It will only happen once.

Hare of Caerbannog

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Re: Mental prep and building medical skills: become an EMT
« Reply #59 on: February 11, 2010, 06:14:32 PM »
OK.
Now that that's settled, lets all return to this fine and informative thread about Mental Prep and Building Medical Skills: Becoming an EMT.

So anyone else out there either a former/current/ or about to be an EMT?

How about RNs?
I was talking to my doctor today and he relieved that out of his entire staff that serves 7 doctors and a physical therapy unit in a successful practice, they don't have one single RN.