Author Topic: creating community  (Read 2995 times)

Offline womule

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creating community
« on: January 13, 2017, 12:44:57 PM »
I live in a neighborhood in SC, and following Hurricane Matthew I realized we might do well to be organized as a community.  we didn't witness any government (i.e. cops ems, fire, national guard etc) in our neighborhood to check on people or help clear the roads.  we all did it ourselves. 

I am happy with how everything ended and have no criticisms though I think if Matthew had been more devastating, we couldve had some real problems.  so I think we would be well served to organize and prepare beforehand. not to mention, the more neighbors are prepared the better it is for me.

has anyone had any experience in forming such an organization? any advice? tips? pitfalls?


nkawtg

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Re: creating community
« Reply #1 on: January 13, 2017, 12:56:55 PM »
I have heard of some people using Neighborhood Watch as a forum for enrolling neighbors for mutual support in emergencies.
Others have started Meetup groups to do the same thing.

Offline Ms. Albatross

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Re: creating community
« Reply #2 on: January 13, 2017, 02:53:49 PM »
I realized we might do well to be organized as a community.

has anyone had any experience in forming such an organization?

You could start a Nextdoor website.  https://nextdoor.com/

My neighborhood has a private Facebook page.

Some people find like-minded people through CERT training or through a volunteer fire department.


Offline TGOWyoming

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Re: creating community
« Reply #3 on: January 13, 2017, 05:25:37 PM »
I lived in Cypress, Texas during hurricane Rita in 2005. Cypress is located on the North West side of Harris County, IE Houston. It was a more rural neighborhood and was situated around the convergence of two creeks, so it flooded very badly. Most of the homes were built on stilts because of this. Rita however was one hell of a storm and the whole neighborhood (45ish households) all pulled together to help each other out.

The neighborhood didn't have a typical HOA, thank goodness, but all the residents got together every year for a 4th of July barbecue and fireworks display in the neighborhoods private park. This really fostered a sense of community and allowed everyone to get to know their neighbors. There were 3 unofficial neighborhood leaders, Greg, Bob, and my father. When anything happened, all the neighbors had their phone numbers and they would contact one of the three. They would then coordinate with everyone else and whatever needed to be done got done. This became very important during Rita; my father used his truck to ford the water and rescue stranded neighbors, Bob used his Kobota tractor to move earth berms, and Greg (situated at the entrance of the neighborhood) relayed information to the first responders whom were unable to ford the high water. Aside from one house burning down, a few people being stranded, and some very upset horses, Rita wasn't all that bad. We only lost power for three days, but almost everyone had a generator of some kind. No one lost their life, and no pets or horses were harmed.

One quality I noticed in all three of the community leaders is that they made the effort to talk to everyone. They knew not only their immediate neighbors, but their distant neighbors as well. They put forth the effort, and it paid off when times got tough. Building strong relationships can go a long way towards community preparedness.

One pitfall that we ran into was "bad" neighbors. The few that were just disagreeable or downright hostile. When Rita hit, everyone still pitched in to help them, and they sung a different tune when it was all over with. Just treat them with respect, but don't expect them to help.

Offline Greekman

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Re: creating community
« Reply #4 on: January 14, 2017, 04:43:55 AM »
nice report...got two questions though

1.
Quote
everyone still pitched in to help them, and they sung a different tune when it was all over with

Does this mean they changed attitude post event? Or just they pretended to Have been good guys pre-event? (so many possible meanings for a foreigner)

2. Did the "leaders" schedule any meeetign between them, or with the whole neighboorhood, or seelcted neighboors?
I am interested in such models of organization.

Offline womule

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Re: creating community
« Reply #5 on: January 14, 2017, 08:28:49 AM »
my neighborhood I believe will be very difficult to deal with. I know some good folks but I also know there are a lot of knotheads, free loaders and the "get off my lawn" types.

I'm thinking I will take a passive aggressive approach. I'll start hosting  meetings to inform people about being prepared.  that alone will ease trouble during a disaster.  secondly, I'll use those meetings as a way to make contact with good useful people.  and by useful I mean people who aren't freeloaders and are team players.  leaders even.

with the contacts I make, I will form an inner circle where we work together and coordinate to help each other and the neighborhood after a storm

Offline Alan Georges

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Re: creating community
« Reply #6 on: January 14, 2017, 08:44:29 AM »
Good stuff TGO, and pretty similar to my experiences after Katrina.

womule, this is a good plan.  Just go slow, should all work fine.

Offline TGOWyoming

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Re: creating community
« Reply #7 on: January 14, 2017, 02:54:34 PM »
nice report...got two questions though

1. Does this mean they changed attitude post event? Or just they pretended to Have been good guys pre-event? (so many possible meanings for a foreigner)

2. Did the "leaders" schedule any meeetign between them, or with the whole neighboorhood, or seelcted neighboors?
I am interested in such models of organization.

1. They did change their attitudes after Katrina. Of course no one ever believes themselves to be a "bad guy" so they didn't think there was anything wrong with them in the first place. But they were much nicer to everyone after the event.

2. The leaders unofficial meeting was generally conducted at Gregs house, where they would get together, have an adult beverage or two, and discuss current events, politics, guns, and the economy. They met every few weeks just to hang out and talk, sometimes other neighbors would join the group, but not always.

Offline allofthemonkeys

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Re: creating community
« Reply #8 on: January 18, 2017, 12:15:54 AM »
While I get it's not for everyone, I have found a good neighborhood church in my area was great for getting to know people.  In time I've found like minded folks, we even had an 'unofficial' shotgun compitition about a year ago.  Some gentlemen will use their tractors to plow the driveways of local widows.  I believe that is community, and it will last in good times and bad.  I just wish I could get a job that would keep us here.

Offline Prepper456

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Re: creating community
« Reply #9 on: December 19, 2019, 08:36:42 PM »
this is my problem finding a good prepper community nearby