Author Topic: oyster mushroom temprature chart  (Read 2752 times)

Offline surfivor

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oyster mushroom temprature chart
« on: December 09, 2016, 06:45:32 AM »
I found a cool chart that shows which types of oyster mushrooms from field and forest fruit at which temperature ranges.

I had really good luck with Pohu this year. I had some Grey Dove as well.
Right now I am inoculating logs with Golden and Italian Oyster. I think I may get 2.5 pound bag of Blue Dolphin. I have been doing totems and buying 5 pound bags of spawn, but it's less work to do smaller amounts and then let those logs produce and then next year inoculate new logs by connecting them to the old logs. Otherwise I have been straining myself a little carrying all this wood around ..


 
https://www.fieldforest.net/pdfs/Oyster%20Strain%20Chart.pdf

Offline xxdabroxx

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Re: oyster mushroom temprature chart
« Reply #1 on: December 09, 2016, 09:41:23 AM »
I cut down a mulberry tree this year and put some Poho plugs in it.  I cut it down this spring but I haven't seen anything fruiting on it yet.  It was a large 12" diameter log though so it may take another season to inoculate.  All the plugs look white under the wax layer.

I may also have not watered it enough throughout the summer, it is sitting between some bushes next to my fence and just out from under my carport to keep it out of the heat.  I also waxed the ends to try and slow down the transpiration which might have been a mistake.  I'll find out next spring or fall I guess.

Offline surfivor

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Re: oyster mushroom temprature chart
« Reply #2 on: December 10, 2016, 09:33:00 AM »
I cut down a mulberry tree this year and put some Poho plugs in it.  I cut it down this spring but I haven't seen anything fruiting on it yet.  It was a large 12" diameter log though so it may take another season to inoculate.  All the plugs look white under the wax layer.

I may also have not watered it enough throughout the summer, it is sitting between some bushes next to my fence and just out from under my carport to keep it out of the heat.  I also waxed the ends to try and slow down the transpiration which might have been a mistake.  I'll find out next spring or fall I guess.

 I am not sure what field and forest says about oysters on mulberry, do you know ?
I have heard of wild oysters on maple, but the people at field and forest told me poplar is one of the best for cultivated oyster. I had no luck at all the previous year with maple or ash.

  I cut down a few poplar last winter and inoculated the logs indoors in a room that was probably 50+ degrees much of the winter. I covered the logs with 39 gallon clear plastic bags and ripped holes in the bags for ventilation. I did totems with sawdust spawn which is much easier than plugs and the method they also recommend. The totems are on bigger log sections but not super long and I leave the logs standing up. I moved all the logs outdoors in April and left the bags on until it started to get really warm weather. The summer was extremely super dry, but in the fall I had tons of the pohu mushrooms. I kept the logs in the shade behind a tall fence on the edge of the woods. They also said soaking the logs does not do anything, and that that only works for shiitake

This is what an oytser totem looks like. Mine did not fruit quite as good as these in the picture but I did not have a cap or bottom piece of wood on.
Which this winter I am doing more of that which is a small 2 inch section of wood on the ends with some spawn in it. I hold the wood pieces together with 3 or 3.5 inch screws that are a type that won't rust as the mushrooms wood absorb anything that came from the screws




Actually, this is a pic of one of my totems from late in the summer, one of the first that fruited and I had a whole bunch later on after that. This would be the pohu. Even though some mushrooms fruited at the bottom of the log, I did not have a bottom piece on. I think the spawn just migrated down the log and got some moisture from the ground. If I had put  bottom on it with some spawn, I probably would have gotten more but maybe next year

http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=58995.0



The second or third year my plan is to take the totems apart and then connect freshly cut pieces of poplar log sections onto some of those. That way the mushrooms should propagate onto new wood. If that all works out, I should in theory have an endless supply of mushrooms without ever having to buy any more spawn. I just keep cutting down a couple of poplar trees every year or two. It also means I can do all that in the winter without having to bring the logs indoors for inoculation.
« Last Edit: December 10, 2016, 09:50:54 AM by surfivor »

Offline surfivor

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Re: oyster mushroom temprature chart
« Reply #3 on: December 10, 2016, 09:53:41 AM »

These metal tags are also good. You etch the type of mushroom in the tag and staple it onto a couple of logs marking which type of mushroom it is, the date etc

https://www.mushroompeople.com/products-page/log-cultivation-supplies/aluminum-tags-100/


Offline xxdabroxx

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Re: oyster mushroom temprature chart
« Reply #4 on: December 11, 2016, 09:14:56 AM »
Mulberry was on the list of OK woods.  I had a tree in my yard I was removing so I picked the mushrooms based on that.  Yours look really good, hopefully mine looks like that this spring.  I figured it wasn't that much of an investment if it goes wrong and I like trying things like this out. 

How do the oysters taste?  I've never had one, but have always liked mushrooms.

Offline surfivor

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Re: oyster mushroom temprature chart
« Reply #5 on: December 11, 2016, 06:00:46 PM »
Mulberry was on the list of OK woods.  I had a tree in my yard I was removing so I picked the mushrooms based on that.  Yours look really good, hopefully mine looks like that this spring.  I figured it wasn't that much of an investment if it goes wrong and I like trying things like this out. 

How do the oysters taste?  I've never had one, but have always liked mushrooms.

 I was never a huge mushroom fan but am like one of those kids where they say they where never as much interested in mushroom pizza until they had the opportunity to pick their own mushrooms. My mother thinks they lack a bit of flavor, but she is usually very picky and critical about alot of different kinds of food. I sometimes like to pick the mushrooms when they are smaller and more tender. Oyster mushrooms can attract some bugs when they get past maturity a bit, but woodchucks, rabbits, squirrels, deer and so on seem to leave them alone.

 My first attempt at Oysters was 300 mail ordered plugs from Oyster creek mushroom farm in Maine. I inoculated 12 or so Poplar logs in April of 2013 and got a really good crop in September of 2014. The following year seems like it must have been really dry and I got hardly any more after that. Oysters do not produce quite as long as shiitake. Last year I used Ash and Maple and got nothing. This past year was a good success however.

 My first shiitake attempt started in April of 2011 on maple logs. I got nothing for 2 years and then I got some pretty good fruiting here and there over a few years but only on a few logs I moved towards the edge of a stream that creates alot of moisture. I have some other shiitake attempts and gotten a few here and there but still have not had a ton of luck for the effort ..

Offline surfivor

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Re: oyster mushroom temprature chart
« Reply #6 on: December 12, 2016, 05:25:30 PM »

 My other mushroom projects went like this:

 I was told by some suppliers that inoculating logs in the winter was fine so I did that. Later I read in some books that this is really not recommended unless it is indoors where the temperature stays above freezing and then you move the logs outdoors in the spring. Despite that some of those logs did produce a little but so far nothing much .. Those where shiitake logs.

 I also tried shiitake and oysters on Ash and Oysters on Maple .. Those seemed to be lost causes that produced nothing so far 

 The other thing that happened is a supplier said I won a contest and sent me free plugs, but I think they where kind of dried out and not the best quality