Author Topic: brushbeater blog post discussion  (Read 26740 times)

Offline Carl

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Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
« Reply #60 on: July 02, 2017, 08:40:42 AM »
  Of course you can get more effective Handheld with obscurity by using the Chinese made 220 MHZ radios.

Offline Smurf Hunter

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Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
« Reply #61 on: July 02, 2017, 08:46:09 AM »
  Of course you can get more effective Handheld with obscurity by using the Chinese made 220 MHZ radios.

If I got into 220mhz, I would want a radio that could do digital packet. The smartest emcomm folks are advocating this, as emergency field setups typically have a VHF voice station in close proximity to a VHF digital station.  Using 220mhz for winlink traffic would lessen interference between them.

Offline SCWolverine

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Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
« Reply #62 on: July 04, 2017, 09:08:47 AM »
If I got into 220mhz, I would want a radio that could do digital packet. The smartest emcomm folks are advocating this, as emergency field setups typically have a VHF voice station in close proximity to a VHF digital station.  Using 220mhz for winlink traffic would lessen interference between them.

now to convince my fellow ARES member to give up their $30 UV5's and pony up for a decent $200+ 220MHz rig (insert ROFLMAO gif)
I do have a few getting ready for Winlink P2P with spare VHF rigs....


Offline Alan Georges

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Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
« Reply #63 on: August 10, 2017, 06:54:19 PM »
It's about drones, but there's also some scanning, comms, and jamming in there:
https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/08/10/open-source-drone-warfare/

Offline Smurf Hunter

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Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
« Reply #64 on: August 11, 2017, 02:30:17 PM »
It's about drones, but there's also some scanning, comms, and jamming in there:
https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/08/10/open-source-drone-warfare/

I really enjoyed that post. Gave me a lot to think about. Drones really are a "force multipler". One could drop a water balloon filled with some seriously unpleasant substance into a living area.  No risk to attacking personnel, and attribution of the attack could be more difficult.

Offline Alan Georges

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Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
« Reply #65 on: August 27, 2017, 02:14:54 PM »
NVIS contest!  Looks cool!  (right?)  I mean NVIS is the regional coverage propagation mode.
https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/08/27/nvis-contest-via-mapoa/

Onward to the contest organizers' announcement page:
https://midatlanticportableoperatorassn.wordpress.com
From the rules:
Quote
Date: 30 September 2017
Start time: 1500 UTC (about an hour after sunrise on the West coast)
End time: 2100 UTC (about an hour before sunset on the East Coast)
Run is 6 hours.

Frequency/Band– 80 meters only; licensed segments between 3.5 and 4.0 mHz
Um, am I missing something?  1500 UTC = 11 AM EDT start, to 2100 UTC = 5 PM EDT end.  Which would work great for 40m, but 80m's going to be dead that time of day.  Surely there's been a typo.

Will watch their web site for updates.  If it's on 40m, it might be worth a try for anyone in the eastern half of the U.S.

Offline Carl

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Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
« Reply #66 on: August 27, 2017, 03:19:38 PM »
NVIS contest!  Looks cool!  (right?)  I mean NVIS is the regional coverage propagation mode.
https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/08/27/nvis-contest-via-mapoa/

Onward to the contest organizers' announcement page:
https://midatlanticportableoperatorassn.wordpress.com
From the rules:Um, am I missing something?  1500 UTC = 11 AM EDT start, to 2100 UTC = 5 PM EDT end.  Which would work great for 40m, but 80m's going to be dead that time of day.  Surely there's been a typo.

Will watch their web site for updates.  If it's on 40m, it might be worth a try for anyone in the eastern half of the U.S.

REMEMBER that NVIS does not need to pass through as much "D" layer at the higher angle and often works well during the day too as 'normal' propagation rules do not apply to the higher angle of operation and 40-60-80 will often work fine during daylight hours.

Offline Alan Georges

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Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
« Reply #67 on: August 27, 2017, 05:34:31 PM »
Good points Carl.  And yet, I've had virtually no contacts on 80m during mid-day hours.  Perhaps this is because everyone else also believes that 80m is closed and goes elsewhere.  Is broad daylight NVIS practiced much on 80m?

Offline Carl

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Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
« Reply #68 on: August 27, 2017, 06:00:39 PM »
Good points Carl.  And yet, I've had virtually no contacts on 80m during mid-day hours.  Perhaps this is because everyone else also believes that 80m is closed and goes elsewhere.  Is broad daylight NVIS practiced much on 80m?

Old habits are hard to die....Just as so many new Hams learn that 'contesting' is how they are supposed to operate and actual conversation is not part of Ham radio communications...just the obligatory FIVE-NINE.

  Forty meters is often better supported during the day,but often 60 and 80 will work for NVIS ...propagation is still a fickle mistress and often uncooperative.

Offline SCWolverine

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Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
« Reply #69 on: August 28, 2017, 06:36:38 AM »
FWIW; I spent some time on HF yesterday  :o doing some FSQ on 40m to a station in Central NC with 10w on a dipole up at about 30'
I also qso'd with a buddy at the top end of the county with the same, on 40m FSQ- this was after lunch / before supper.  We (my bud in the same county) usually always have good luck with 40m.

Offline Alan Georges

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Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
« Reply #70 on: September 19, 2017, 06:30:48 AM »
Brushbeater's dialing back on the blog so that he can dial up on local issues:
https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/09/18/better-things-or-doing-versus-talking/

I'm sure he'll be around, but not quite as thick with the posts as in the last couple of years.

Offline Alan Georges

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Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
« Reply #71 on: September 29, 2017, 05:27:21 PM »

Offline Alan Georges

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Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
« Reply #72 on: October 16, 2017, 05:33:09 AM »
New post up:
https://brushbeater.wordpress.com/2017/10/15/reflections-on-puerto-rico/

Puerto Rico is starting to look like the worst of the Katrina aftermath writ large.  Lots of comms lessons there.  The main one he presses is to be ready to operate bare-bones HF after a disaster, especially using NVIS.  Also, teach others so that you're not the only HF radio operator in your group.

Offline LodeRunner

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Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
« Reply #73 on: November 05, 2017, 09:14:09 PM »
...
Things I want to improve:
Operating Skills
Scanning, Monitoring, Signals Collection


Hey Smurf,

When it comes to Scanning/Monitoring and Signal Collection, probably the best thing you can do -gear wise- is to start using an SDR receiver.

Running an SDR, all the most important parts of your "equipment" are software, so it's easy to try different things and find what's best for you.
Trunking decoders, protocol decoders, noise reduction "filters", and adding entirely new modes to your capabilities is all done in software.
After trying several RTL/SDR "dongles" and other solutions that were of limited use, I found the SDRPlay, and it's a pretty amazing piece of gear.
http://www.sdrplay.com/

I now have two of their RSP-2 receivers, and with them I can capture 16Mhz of spectrum for immediate monitoring, and for recording to HD for later review.  I mostly use them for MF/HF monitoring and capture, but the RSP receivers cover all the way up into the lower microwave spectrum, and they do a very nice job as an SDS (Software Defined Scanner) for VHF/UHF. 
I already have several (hardware) scanners covering VHF/UHF; and I live way out in the country so there's not much to be heard unless I point my beams at one of the urban areas... so my focus is more towards MF/HF monitoring - but I have a friend who lives in a very urban area - he's right in the thick of things V/UHF wise being <20 miles from the state capital.  I brought one of my RSP-2s to his place and we used his existing scanner antenna to try it out in a high-RF environment and it did very well.  So well that he ordered one for himself - he now has it covering all the frequencies that two of his older scanners had been.  He really likes the fact that if he records the direct-sampled RF spectrum to his HDD, then he can go back later and look for activity on frequencies that he didn't even have programmed when the recording was made.    Taking that concept to the extreme, I don't 'program frequencies' at all - I select chunks of spectrum and record them, then go back and look for the interesting bits later.  As I do a better job building tools and scripts to search through these massive recordings, I am missing less and less of what pass through the MF/HF spectrum because I don't 'scan', I Data-Mine the recordings.

I will probably buy another one or two RSPs as soon as budget permits, because I want to be able to set up a remote-receive station and 'pipe' it back to me as a private WEB-SDR (and share it with a few friends).   The remote-receive site I'm looking at is extremely RF quiet, and is far enough away from my friends and I so that we could run Full Duplex on MF/HF -- and not de-sense the remote RX site even if we ran 1500 watts.  Cheap laptop + SDRplay receiver + Internet connection = a high-quality, private remote-RX facility that you can access from anywhere.  <-- It's becoming really easy to do stuff like this with the newer technologies available, so the whole monitoring scene is changing rapidly

Best of all, they're very inexpensive for what they can do - the RSP-1 is less than $150 now, and the RSP-2 was $189 when I bought mine, I think they have/are going to lower that to $169.

The first SDR I ever bought was an Icom PCR1500 back in 2001/2, and I don't even want to tell you what it cost.  The SDRPlay receivers do way more than the PCR1500 ever dreamed of, and have a much better software front end (SDR-Uno application) than anything else available right now.

Cheers


Offline LodeRunner

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Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
« Reply #74 on: November 05, 2017, 09:22:18 PM »
Is broad daylight NVIS practiced much on 80m?

Not in the last 5 to 7 years.  But as we go deeper into the trough of the sunspot cycle, 80M NVIS comms will become more viable during daylight.  Plan on it becoming very useful in another 2 or 3 years.  At the same time, you'll NEED 160M for nighttime NVIS, because 80M will be 'running long' very shortly after local sunset and NVIS will become difficult. (40M is like this now, and the further towards solar bottom we go, the lower the Optimum Frequency' will fall at any given time of day)

Offline Smurf Hunter

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Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
« Reply #75 on: November 06, 2017, 09:33:27 AM »
Not in the last 5 to 7 years.  But as we go deeper into the trough of the sunspot cycle, 80M NVIS comms will become more viable during daylight.  Plan on it becoming very useful in another 2 or 3 years.  At the same time, you'll NEED 160M for nighttime NVIS, because 80M will be 'running long' very shortly after local sunset and NVIS will become difficult. (40M is like this now, and the further towards solar bottom we go, the lower the Optimum Frequency' will fall at any given time of day)

160m NVIS seems like it'd require quite a tall mast.

Offline Carl

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Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
« Reply #76 on: November 06, 2017, 09:35:55 AM »
160m NVIS seems like it'd require quite a tall mast.

160 meters pretty much just flows along the ground at night,it my bounce a bit but I picture it more as a 'flow'

Offline Alan Georges

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Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
« Reply #77 on: January 02, 2018, 05:24:16 PM »
brushbeater is back with two new posts:
Top Band Magic: The Inverted L on 160M
and
High Frequency Ops: A Dedicated QRP Rig vs. Full Power in the Field

I need to give them a reading-over again, might even have something to add after that.  Anyway, brushbeater's still around.

Offline Carl

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Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
« Reply #78 on: January 02, 2018, 06:18:01 PM »
brushbeater is back with two new posts:
Top Band Magic: The Inverted L on 160M
and
High Frequency Ops: A Dedicated QRP Rig vs. Full Power in the Field

I need to give them a reading-over again, might even have something to add after that.  Anyway, brushbeater's still around.

In the QRP/QRO...he is wrong to say you need 21 amps to run a 100 watt HF radio in transmit...SSB or Voice uses a PEAK of 20 to 23 Amps ,but an AVERAGE of SEVEN AMPS and this is doable with a 7 of better 12 Amp Hour SLA battery and can be greatly enhanced with a capacitor in line near the radio like ONE FARAD or even less to better provide the 20 something Amp peaks better than a battery can. I use a 3 FARAD at home on a VHF SSB amplifier that will put out 330 to 366 watts without the capacitor and as much as 550 Watts with the 3 farad cap ($35 on Amazon)
  Worthwhile boost in the but for small investment and even a 100,000 Microfarad capacitor will work for this trick.

Offline Alan Georges

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Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
« Reply #79 on: January 03, 2018, 06:49:47 AM »
Yeah, more of the same.  We thrashed around with QRP more and better in another thread, and 160 meters is mostly a fun wintertime pursuit, at least for anyone not running a big amp.

Offline Alan Georges

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Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
« Reply #80 on: January 17, 2018, 06:55:17 AM »
Top Band Magic Part II
The author finishes construction, gets on 160 meters with a QRP rig, makes contacts, and promptly gets lectured by the rag-chew regulars about using low power on *ahem* their band.

But it worked.
« Last Edit: January 17, 2018, 07:05:40 AM by Alan Georges »

Offline Alan Georges

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Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
« Reply #81 on: January 20, 2018, 07:24:12 PM »
The Inverted L Antenna and NVIS
Interesting EZ-NEC modeling, but it seems like a lot of extra trouble for little gain compared to a low dipole or even a low random wire tuned against shack ground.

Offline Alan Georges

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Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
« Reply #82 on: February 27, 2018, 06:16:59 AM »
Catching up a little on the brushbeater blog:

Winter Field Day '18 After Action Report
There's a short list of takeaways regarding low sunspot levels, crummy propagation, battery & power management, and the value of operating experience.

A Recent Course Review
Just like the title says, a student writes a review of a class recently presented by the blogger.  Worth a read.  Nothing too specific, but you may pick up some training ideas here.

Offline Smurf Hunter

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Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
« Reply #83 on: February 27, 2018, 07:24:25 AM »
Catching up a little on the brushbeater blog:

Winter Field Day '18 After Action Report
There's a short list of takeaways regarding low sunspot levels, crummy propagation, battery & power management, and the value of operating experience.

A Recent Course Review
Just like the title says, a student writes a review of a class recently presented by the blogger.  Worth a read.  Nothing too specific, but you may pick up some training ideas here.

Per the WFD post, I agree those 35ah harbor freight batteries are a deal when you apply the ubiquitous 20% off coupon.
Aside from the built in carry handle, they are reasonable weight to carry by hand.

Offline Alan Georges

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Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
« Reply #84 on: February 27, 2018, 05:54:26 PM »
Per the WFD post, I agree those 35ah harbor freight batteries are a deal when you apply the ubiquitous 20% off coupon.
Aside from the built in carry handle, they are reasonable weight to carry by hand.
Holy cats, you're right Smurf.  $70 - $14 = $56 for a safe, reliable, non-exotic, man-luggable power solution is a deal.  Very suitable for car camping or home emergencies.  Had to go look it up, here's the link: https://www.harborfreight.com/12-volt-35-amp-hour-universal-battery-68680.html

Offline Smurf Hunter

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Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
« Reply #85 on: February 28, 2018, 10:01:10 AM »
Holy cats, you're right Smurf.  $70 - $14 = $56 for a safe, reliable, non-exotic, man-luggable power solution is a deal.  Very suitable for car camping or home emergencies.  Had to go look it up, here's the link: https://www.harborfreight.com/12-volt-35-amp-hour-universal-battery-68680.html

I was on my phone last post and too lazy to link.  :)
Glad you found it.  On certain holidays the coupons go up to 25% off.

I have 2 of those sitting under my work bench. Each is fitted with 30amp power poles so I can lug them into the shack, or the field in a pinch.

Offline Carl

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Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
« Reply #86 on: February 28, 2018, 10:35:52 AM »
I was on my phone last post and too lazy to link.  :)
Glad you found it.  On certain holidays the coupons go up to 25% off.

I have 2 of those sitting under my work bench. Each is fitted with 30amp power poles so I can lug them into the shack, or the field in a pinch.

Watch for on line discounts or coupons as the physical stores often don't co ordinate well though they must honor a printed on line sale price.

Offline Alan Georges

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Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
« Reply #87 on: March 06, 2018, 06:36:22 AM »
Next up:
Open Sources: Of Spies, Sedition, and Ham Radio
Haven't read through the linked articles yet, but it all revolves around the curious case of Nellie Ohr.  Will read when time and work allows, maybe have something coherent to say then.  In the meantime... maybe this better fits under the Political Sandbox or even Tin Foil Hat Brigade, but this thread was already here.

Offline Alan Georges

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Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
« Reply #88 on: March 06, 2018, 05:46:29 PM »
Not a lot there.  Tech ticket only, political commentators trying to gin things up like she was beaming signals back to Stalin's tomb in Mother Russia, and lots and lots of speculation down in the comments section on how VHF/UHF could be used to circumvent internet surveillance.  Absolutely no solid connection between her professional activities and radio transmissions, though there was some rampant speculation (if you can imagine that).  For bonus points, LodeRunner makes an appearance.

What's more, there's not much of a comms lesson to be learned.  Tight beams, low power, data transmission, blah blah blah.  Nothing that hasn't been hashed over in many places many times.  Ah well, at least I got filled in on what's been in the news these last couple of weeks and why friends and family keep asking me about the ham radio connection.

Offline Smurf Hunter

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Re: brushbeater blog post discussion
« Reply #89 on: March 06, 2018, 08:57:22 PM »
Not a lot there.  Tech ticket only, political commentators trying to gin things up like she was beaming signals back to Stalin's tomb in Mother Russia, and lots and lots of speculation down in the comments section on how VHF/UHF could be used to circumvent internet surveillance.  Absolutely no solid connection between her professional activities and radio transmissions, though there was some rampant speculation (if you can imagine that).  For bonus points, LodeRunner makes an appearance.

What's more, there's not much of a comms lesson to be learned.  Tight beams, low power, data transmission, blah blah blah.  Nothing that hasn't been hashed over in many places many times.  Ah well, at least I got filled in on what's been in the news these last couple of weeks and why friends and family keep asking me about the ham radio connection.

Because the only thing stopping all these preppers from forming effective insurgent groups during a collapse are their comms?

Any student of cold war history knows a great deal of kinetic action was facilitated by dead drop paper communication and implemented with a sharp object or poison.