Author Topic: challenges of spinach bolting  (Read 510 times)

Offline surfivor

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challenges of spinach bolting
« on: May 18, 2017, 05:24:45 PM »
 I am starting to realize the challenge of growing spinach. We had a warm spell on February. The spinach I planted then did the best. A few hot days in the upper 80's or 90 seems to make the spinach bolt. We are getting some really hot weather right now and the same thing happened last spring. Just when the spinach starts to look good, a few hot days seems to wreck everything.

 I am zone 6. My camp is zone 4b or 5, but I am not up there much and there's lots of wildlife and no fences

 I have found some interesting links. I may have to try some kind of hybrid spinach. Are there any significant downsides to hybrid plants ? I have found that swiss chard and romaine are good choices for crops that are more heat tolerant and I have been growing alot of that.

 Last year I had problems with woodchucks and rabbits but I bombed out a woodchuck, trapped a smaller one and build a 5 foot fenced in garden area

 I downloaded this pdf. I will stick in on my tablet and study it a bit sometime:

 http://varietytrials.eorganic.info/sites/eorg-variety7/files/Spinach%202004%202005.pdf

"The CSU Specialty Crops Program conducted a spinach variety
trial during the summer of 2004 at the Horticulture Research
Center northeast of Fort Collins, Colorado. Of interest were
varieties of spinach that were bolting and blue mold resistant.
Thirty one cultivars of spinach were evaluated. "

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http://extension.oregonstate.edu/gardening/node/466

"Last summer, Oregon State University Vegetable Farm researchers found two varieties of spinach to tolerate summer's long days and heat without bolting - Correnta and Spinner. These are good to plant in the late spring and early summer."

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http://forums2.gardenweb.com/discussions/1480837/how-do-i-stop-my-spinach-seedlings-from-bolting


Offline Cedar

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Re: challenges of spinach bolting
« Reply #1 on: May 18, 2017, 06:51:28 PM »
Keep it cut too. As well as the two varieties you mentioned, many of us grow New Zealand spinach.

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Offline surfivor

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Re: challenges of spinach bolting
« Reply #2 on: May 19, 2017, 06:38:47 AM »
Keep it cut too. As well as the two varieties you mentioned, many of us grow New Zealand spinach.

Cedar

 New Zealand spinach doesn't seem to compare with bloomsdale etc in my mind

Offline PorcupineKate

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Re: challenges of spinach bolting
« Reply #3 on: May 19, 2017, 07:16:17 AM »
I have almost completely given up on growing spinach in my garden.  I find we go from too cold to too hot with not enough time to keep the spinach from bolting.  I have had the best luck with transplants over direct seeding in the garden in the spring.   


I have found that Red Russian Kale is easy to grow here in NH and use it in place of spinach.  I like the Red Russian kale because it doesn't get bitter when large and is great as a baby green.  It is happy in partial shade and in full sun.  In the winter I grow it as a baby green in window boxes under florescent lights.  I have let it go to seed and it happily replanted its self.

Offline mountainmoma

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Re: challenges of spinach bolting
« Reply #4 on: May 19, 2017, 08:45:30 AM »
I have almost completely given up on growing spinach in my garden.  I find we go from too cold to too hot with not enough time to keep the spinach from bolting.  I have had the best luck with transplants over direct seeding in the garden in the spring.   


I have found that Red Russian Kale is easy to grow here in NH and use it in place of spinach.  I like the Red Russian kale because it doesn't get bitter when large and is great as a baby green.  It is happy in partial shade and in full sun.  In the winter I grow it as a baby green in window boxes under florescent lights.  I have let it go to seed and it happily replanted its self.

This is exactly what I have found, and no longer attempt it. I have other greens, including red russian kale as our favorite, followed by Magenta Spreen lambsquarts, then a bit of chard and new zealand spinach ( which is not a true spinach, it likes summer)
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