Author Topic: Clover for grass supression  (Read 289 times)

Offline Speaker0311

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Clover for grass supression
« on: July 06, 2017, 08:29:51 AM »
I'm thinking of seeding our garden spot with dutch white clover and then cutting rows in it to plant into.
I'm thinking everything we plant will grow taller than the clover and help keep weeds down while holding moisture in the ground.
Has anyone tried this?
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Offline CharlesH

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Re: Clover for grass supression
« Reply #1 on: July 06, 2017, 05:25:52 PM »
I have not, but here are a couple things to think about that I do have experience with.
 
1. White clover does send out runners.  They can be picked, but I suspect they will work their way into your crop rows.
 
2. I have a hay field that has red and white clover plus birds eye trefoil in addition to several species of grass.  I can assure you the clover in no way hinders the growthi of my grasses.
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Offline Skunkeye

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Re: Clover for grass supression
« Reply #2 on: October 12, 2017, 01:08:51 PM »
I suspect it depends a lot on what kind of weeds you have.  If you have an aggressive "runner" type grass like Bermuda, it won't be very effective.  I tried to use white clover as a "living mulch" on one of my garden beds this year, and the Bermuda grass ran right into it.  It did seem to slow down some of the lower-growing weeds, but vining plants like bindweed just carried right on.  I think the basic rule might be that it will help reduce weeds that grow from seeds, but anything that comes from a persistent root isn't going to be affected much.

I did find that weeding was difficult without tearing up a lot of the clover, so you might have to reseed periodically.  I think it can work, but the first couple years will be a lot of work.  Once the weeds are under control, and the soil seed bank is depleted, the clover would probably do a good job at suppressing future weeds.
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