Author Topic: Shop was broken into, installed a camera/dvr system  (Read 4019 times)

Offline machinisttx

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Shop was broken into, installed a camera/dvr system
« on: August 13, 2017, 10:38:13 PM »
The system is capable of sending messages or video to phones/tablets or a webpage. Unfortunately, there is no internet access in my shop and it's ~50 feet from my house. I'm thinking that running an ethernet cable that far isn't going to work very well. Am I wrong, or can it be done?

Offline Skispcs

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Re: Shop was broken into, installed a camera/dvr system
« Reply #1 on: August 14, 2017, 07:39:39 AM »
The Ethernet spec allows for cables of up to 100 meters.
That being said, running one outside between building leads to other issues.

Some people would just run any old cable between a pair of switches. Personally I would run outdoor rated Cat6 shielded and I would ground both ends to prevent a potential voltage difference between the buildings.

At 50 feet, you could do wireless easily.

Offline jerseyboy

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Re: Shop was broken into, installed a camera/dvr system
« Reply #2 on: August 14, 2017, 07:42:50 AM »
The system is capable of sending messages or video to phones/tablets or a webpage. Unfortunately, there is no internet access in my shop and it's ~50 feet from my house. I'm thinking that running an ethernet cable that far isn't going to work very well. Am I wrong, or can it be done?

https://superuser.com/questions/822031/maximum-length-of-ethernet-over-cat5

Cat5e has a 328 ft limit.

You can also run a wireless router/repeater with external yagi antennas, but the cable would be better.

Yagi WiFi Antenna 2.4GHz 17dBi Angle H:25° V:24 Outdoor Directional Wireless https://www.amazon.com/dp/B008Z4I7WQ/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_HIAKzbJWXMVBP

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Offline Cedar

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Re: Shop was broken into, installed a camera/dvr system
« Reply #3 on: August 14, 2017, 08:06:11 AM »
Large ugly shop dog?

Cedar

edit: archer
« Last Edit: August 14, 2017, 08:54:31 AM by archer »

Offline ncjeeper

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Re: Shop was broken into, installed a camera/dvr system
« Reply #4 on: August 14, 2017, 10:22:01 AM »
Large ugly shop dog?

Cedar

edit: archer
Better yet get two.  ;)

Offline machinisttx

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Re: Shop was broken into, installed a camera/dvr system
« Reply #5 on: August 15, 2017, 07:37:28 PM »
I'm going to run wired, and bury the cable in PVC. I'll run the outdoor rated, shielded CAT6. Need to buy/install four more cameras on the box too.

I don't really want to run wireless for this, though that was my first thought.

Offline outoforder2day

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Re: Shop was broken into, installed a camera/dvr system
« Reply #6 on: August 16, 2017, 08:38:14 AM »
Shielded cable is a good idea. Always run the latest spec cable. Why run 5 when you can run 6?
Also, you can look at powerline adapters. They don't always work well, so you'd have to test it, but that's my primary plan for my barn. I have one similar to this in use in my house right now. https://www.amazon.com/TRENDnet-Powerline-Ethernet-Adapter-TPL-401E2K/dp/B004D9V8C8
It works well within my house and, since the barn is powered from the house, should work there too. Note: I have not tested that yet.


Offline machinisttx

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Re: Shop was broken into, installed a camera/dvr system
« Reply #8 on: August 25, 2017, 04:36:23 PM »
So that converts it to fiber optic? I'm guessing I would need one on each end? I found a shielded 150' CAT 7 cable for $35, so that's probably the route I will go.

I also just purchased another system for the house and one of these two is going to use the last port on my router. How do I add more ethernet ports? I have an old wired router around here somewhere, if it's possible to configure it to work as a hub.

Offline jerseyboy

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Re: Shop was broken into, installed a camera/dvr system
« Reply #9 on: August 26, 2017, 08:14:14 AM »
So that converts it to fiber optic? I'm guessing I would need one on each end? I found a shielded 150' CAT 7 cable for $35, so that's probably the route I will go.

I also just purchased another system for the house and one of these two is going to use the last port on my router. How do I add more ethernet ports? I have an old wired router around here somewhere, if it's possible to configure it to work as a hub.

But a switch. Plug the switch into the router and computers and other devices into the switch.  An 8 port switch will add six ports to your system.  You can put a switch on each router  port and you can even nest them,  but don't go too deep if you can help it.  You will also need an extra Cat5/6/7 to connect the switch to the router.

TP-Link TL-SG108 8-Port Gigabit Ethernet Metal Network Switch | Limited | Unmanaged https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00A121WN6/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_YeyOzb30RAMX3

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Offline machinisttx

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Re: Shop was broken into, installed a camera/dvr system
« Reply #10 on: August 27, 2017, 09:55:23 AM »
Thanks!

Offline creuzerm

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Re: Shop was broken into, installed a camera/dvr system
« Reply #11 on: February 04, 2019, 07:49:55 PM »
Looking at pre-solving this same problem. I am going to solve the distance issue with fiber optic networking. A family member gave me some "Media Converters". The ones I have are very nice POE (Power over ethernet) units at over $300 a piece new, but amazon has cheaper units down around $40 each.

Key locations in the house plus outbuildings will get fiber pulled to them, so I can have high speed (gigbit or 10gb) access with computers, plus solid connections to the wifi access points. The garage will get it's own wifi and ethernet networking so I can stream high-resolution cameras (4) plus motion sensors. Plus I will have my home-office in the garage until I can move it across the street.

I will probably use a couple of wifi access points that look like satellite dishes (or I may make my own directional antenna)  to jump the street and use the fiber networking to bring the internet all the way back to the remote building on 50 acres.

Fiber optic networking looks to be a bit more complicated, as it's not all compatible with itself like ethernet is.

My oversimplification as I currently understand it (somebody will probably jump in and correct me on some points)
The variations and compatibility checks revolve around laser, cable, and ends.
Three are  2 lasers 850nm and 1300nm or called multimode and singlemode respectivly.
There are 2 types of cable that works with either of the lasers, so you need to pick the appropriate cable. There then are different numberings dealing with the specific cable diameters such as 125/50 etc as well as ratings OM2, OM3. For short distances (under half a mile?) all we really need to concern ourselves with is multimode/singlemode as that interacts with the laser itself and the diameter. The other rating isn't a big impact on short distances.
There are several connector types, SC, LC, and a few others. These need to match.

It looks like to run fiber optic runs, we want 2 media converters to plug into the ethernet cable, and then a fiber optic cable that matches the specs on the media converter. I'd start with the cheap media converters, and get the fiber to suit that requirement. I don't think we need to spec it the other way around unless you are putting fiber along your fencelines to the barn on the opposite side of your square mile (wouldn't that be a great problem to have)

  This is a pair of gigabit media converts with 15 meters (nearly 50 feet) of fiber coiled up.

The fiber is more than the Cat5e/Cat6 that was mentioned previously, PLUS we still need some of that to manage each end. But the fiber can go much further, doesn't have issues with slowing down if it's in a saturated wet environment, and lightning won't follow it. And it can go faster if you get 10gb networking gear. Imaging reading files off a computer over the network from the far side of the property faster than your computer can write it to disk.