Author Topic: Natural Antibiotic Alternatives  (Read 14447 times)

Sandman

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Natural Antibiotic Alternatives
« on: June 07, 2009, 04:13:07 PM »
Natural Antibiotic Alternatives

If TSHTF and you have injured people on your hands, what do you do? Do you have a significant stash of antibiotics on hand to treat these medical patients? If not, they might die. What do you do? Before the advent of antibiotics, doctors were still healing people. They knew that there are medicinal herbs that can help. Many native peoples have used these plants for sometimes thousands of years. If you can grow a vegetable garden, you can grow medicinal herbs too. Some of them are even used as kitchen herbs. Grow & dry them now, and store them away for future usage as extracts, infusions, ointments, etc. Of course, don't give anything to children or pregnant mothers without specific medical advice first.

(Disclaimer: I'm neither a doctor nor a naturopath. Nor am I giving medical advice here. Ask a doctor if you want medical advice. This is for informational purposes only)

Echinacea: Used internally or externally. Fights infection & boosts the immune system. Can be used against many different viruses, bacteria and fungi, including skin wounds, snake bites, allergies, insect bites & stings, burns, ear infections, colds, flu, eczema, low white blood cell count, radiation poisoning related immuno deficiencies, sinusitis, urinary tract infections, skin ulcers, staph infections, and sore throats.
It's not to be used with patients with auto-immune disorders as it complicates their condition.

Goldenseal:
Used internally. Cleans blood. Fights infection.

Wild Indigo: Used internally or externally. Has antibiotic and immune-stimulating effects, and it has anti-mucous decongestant properties. Works on a wide range of bacteria and fungi, including respiratory tract infections, ear infections, mouth ulcers, gingivitis, and to treat abrasions, skin infections, and wounds. Don't use in large doses as it can be unhealthy to do so.

Myrrh: Used internally & externally. It has a direct antimicrobial effect and is used to treat a wide range of viral, bacterial, and fungal infections, to include respiratory infections, stomach complaints, skin infections, abscesses, boils, sores, wounds, asthma, bronchitis, colds, flu, sinusitis, sore throats, herpes simplex, mouth and throat pain.

Sage: Used internally. It has antibacterial properties and is used to treat mouth and throat inflammation, mouth-throat-tonsil infections, mouth ulcers, diarrhea, gastritis, and enteritis. It makes a good mouthwash and gargle. Long-term or excessive use can be unhealthy. Pregnant women need to stay away from this one.

Thyme: Used internally or externally. It's an antiseptic and used for treating wounds, respiratory infections, coughing (expectorant, anti-spasm), tonsillitis, pharyngitis, laryngitis, bronchitis and asthma. Don't overuse this one as it'll become unhealthy.

Garlic: Used internally or externally. It's an antibiotic and antiseptic for treating wounds, respiratory infections, intestinal parasites and infections such as cholera, dysentary, and typhoid. It also has blood cholesterol lowering and anticancer properties.

Wormwood/Absinthe: Used internally. Has anti-worm properties. Can be used as a local anesthetic. Don't use in large quantities as it then becomes unhealthy. Pregnant women need to stay away from this one.

Thuja: Used internally or externally. Has antiviral and antibacterial properties. Can be used for respiratory tract and digestive tract viruses, as well as warts of all kinds and external fungal infections. It could also be useful for surface wounds and burns. It's also bee known to counteract the ill effects of the smallpox vaccination... If used internally, seek professional medical advice for safety, or use a homeopathic preparation.

These are just a few herbs with proven medicinal uses. There are many more available to use for a wide range of medical problems. Most of the over-the-counter preparations are weak and over-processed, producing weaker results. But if you make these yourself, you can control the concentration and efficacy. To prepare these herbs for use, you have to learn how to make extracts, infusions, ointments, etc. There are many good books on the market that cover everything from growing to preparing herbs for medicinal usage.

Additionally, there are many other medical treatments available for alternative medicine such as Colloidal Silver, homeopathy, nutritional therapy, etc. that can also be utilized. Set yourself up with these natural medicinal options now so that when a serious need arises for antibiotics in a future crisis, you won't have this panicked look on your face. You'll be ready.

- taken from 'Natural Alternatives to Antibiotics', by Dr. John McKenna

walker

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Re: Natural Antibiotic Alternatives
« Reply #1 on: June 10, 2009, 12:08:02 AM »
I continue to learn more each day, and I am open to consider alternative treatment options, but here is another interesting perspective on herbal remedies:

$2.5B spent, no alternative medicine cures found

http://www.timesrepublican.com/page/content.detail/id/517242.html?nav=5005


You can search each of your chosen remedies at the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine to help in your own search for answers:
http://nccam.nih.gov/research/results/

Cochrane Reviews:
http://www.cochrane.org/reviews/en/topics/22_reviews.html

PubMed:
%20or%20NCCAM%20[gr]&doptcmdl=Abstract]http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?db=pubmed&cmd=Search&term=AT%20[gr]%20or%20NCCAM%20[gr]&doptcmdl=Abstract

Office of Dietary Supplements:
http://ods.od.nih.gov/Health_Information/Information_About_Individual_Dietary_Supplements.aspx


« Last Edit: May 01, 2013, 12:24:28 AM by Archer »

Sandman

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Re: Natural Antibiotic Alternatives
« Reply #2 on: June 10, 2009, 11:31:08 PM »
Plants have been used for medicinal purposes for as long as history has been recorded. China, India, Egypt, and Assyria appear to have been the places which cradled the use of herbs, but herbalism was common in Europe by medieval times. Despite the progress in orthodox medicine, interest in alternative medicine, including herbalism, is on the increase in the West — and for 80% of the world herbal medicine is still the only kind to which ordinary persons have ready access.

A great variety of plants are used for medicinal treatments. Either the dried plant, or a specific part of it (root, leaves, fruit, flowers, seeds), is formulated into suitable preparations — compressed as tablets or made into pills, used to make infusions (teas), extracts, tinctures, etc., or mixed with excipients to make lotions, ointments, creams, etc. Few herbal drugs are subject to legislative control. Obviously control is needed for poppy capsules (which contain opium), belladonna, digitalis, nux vomica beans (which contain strychnine), and rauwolfia (which contains reserpine). Most herbal remedies are freely available, although rarely have any been investigated with the thoroughness of orthodox medicines. The claims made for many herbal remedies are for trivial or minor ailments, due partly to the strictures put on legal claims for efficacy, and partly because herbalists claim to treat the whole person to restore normal physiological balance, rather than to treat or cure a particular medical illness. Activities of herbal medicines are often described in very general terms — such as carminative, laxative, demulcent, antitussive, expectorant, sedative, antiseptic, or astringent. Unlike orthodox medicines, which usually consist of a single, isolated principle often synthetic), plants or extracts of plants contain multiple constituents, not all of them active.

Herbalists often claim that the admixture of multiple constituents leads to synergism between the active moieties. Similarly, many consider that since plants are natural materials they are safer and will produce fewer side-effects than synthetic drugs. There is little substance or reason in either of these claims. For example, comfrey (Symphytum officinale) is considered a safe herb and is used as a demulcent. However, it contains pyrrolizidine alkaloids, which are toxic to the liver and can cause liver cancer. Media attention can often cause a major increase in the demand and use of herbal drugs — for example, evening primrose oil, feverfew, Ginko biloba, and ginseng. One of the problems with herbal drugs, especially those with active principles which have well-defined medicinal effects (e.g. digitalis), is that the amount of active principle(s) varies according to the location where the plant is grown, the prevailing weather conditions, etc., so it is vital in these instances that the crude material is assayed appropriately so that the dosage can be accurately controlled, especially where the therapeutic ratio is low. (Therapeutic ratio is the ratio of the dose causing toxic effects to that required for treatment.)

From time to time new drugs are discovered from herbal sources — for example, taxol, derived from the yew, is an important drug for some forms of cancer. The active principle is extracted and purified from plant material for as long as that process remains economically viable compared with chemical synthesis.

— Alan W. Cuthbert
 
Columbia Encyclopedia: herbal medicine

Herbal medicine, use of natural plant substances (botanicals) to treat and prevent illness. The practice has existed since prehistoric times and flourishes today as the primary form of medicine for perhaps as much as 80% of the world's population. Over 80,000 species of plants are in use throughout the world. Along with acupuncture, herbal medicine is considered primary health care in China, where it has been in documented use for over 2,500 years.

Herbs may be used directly as teas or extracts, or they may be used in the production of drugs. Approximately 25% of the prescription drugs sold in the United States are plant based. Many more herbal ingredients are present in over-the-counter drugs, such as laxatives. Medicines that come from plants include aspirin from willow bark (Salix species) and digitalis from foxglove (Digitalis purpurea).

Scientific interest in herbal medicine in the United States has lagged behind that in the countries of Asia and W Europe; in Germany, for example, one third of graduating physicians have studied herbal medicine, and a comprehensive therapeutic guide to herbal medicines has long been published there. Nonetheless, millions of people in the United States use herbal products to treat a wide variety of ailments or to enhance health. Among the more popular remedies used are ginseng, to increase stamina and as a mild sedative; St.-John's-wort, for mild depression; echinacea, to aid the immune system and alleviate colds; kava, to calm anxiety and treat insomnia; saw palmetto, for enlarged prostate; and ginkgo biloba, to improve short-term memory (see ginkgo). Some people have used botanicals in an attempt to stave off serious illnesses such as AIDS.

This widespread use has prompted demands that herbal remedies be regulated as drugs to insure quality standards. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) can require a clinical trial on any herb that has a health claim on its label, but medical testing, which is geared toward observing a particular active component, is difficult to apply to herbs, which may have many interacting ingredients. Debate over botanicals' validity and safety as medicines and over the appropriate degree of government regulation continues. The Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act, passed in 1994, reclassified herbs as dietary supplements rather than food additives. It forbids unreasonable health claims by the manufacturers, but makes it the FDA's responsibility to prove that a marketed product is unsafe. (In contrast, in prescription and over-the-counter drugs, it is the manufacturer's responsibility to prove safety and effectiveness before a drug can be marketed.)

Another concern surrounding herbal medicine is the availability of wild plants for a growing market; it is feared that the limited supplies of known wild herbs are being threatened by overharvesting and habitat loss. The potential of isolating beneficial drugs from plants, however, has prompted large pharmaceutical companies to contribute to the conservation of the tropical rain forest. Biologists have called for more careful study of medicinal plants, especially regarding their capacity for sustainable harvesting and the effects of cultivation on their efficacy as medicaments.

Bibliography

See V. E. Tyler and S. Foster, Tyler's Honest Herbal (rev. ed. 1999); The Physicians' Desk Reference for Herbal Medicines (annual).

http://www.answers.com/topic/herbalism


sage0925

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Re: Natural Antibiotic Alternatives
« Reply #3 on: June 11, 2009, 12:00:32 AM »
Ok...ya'll are going to force me onto my anti-FDA hobby horse...

A lot of the reason that none of these tests for herbal cures have been found to be inconclusive is because;

1) The FDA is in the pocket of the pharmaceutical industry. If that industry is unable to reproduce the active ingredient synthetically so that it works like the whole herb does, then they dismiss it as being "useless". You can't patent an herb. A lot of herbs work synergically...that is to say, there are a lot of other chemicals in an herb that make it work the way it does...isolating one active ingredient that you can reproduce synthetically, doesn't mean it's going to work the way the whole herb does. And if they think they can't make money off of it...why bother?

2) I've seen details of their tests...they give some people capsules of the powdered herbs in it...a lot of herbs don't work that way...they have to be "processed" to work properly...which these testers don't bother with. Take Pau d' Arco, for example...if you don't boil it, or make a tincture with it, it will cause more problems than it fixes. Boiled, it works against viruses, like herpes. In a capsule, the raw bark, will just make things worse. Roots and barks, for the most part, have to be boiled or processed into a tincture to work. leaves and flowers have to be steeped...for the most part...berries like hawthorne, have to be deconcocted...that is to say...steeped in water for a couple days before they're worth anything. The Cohoshes are a prime example...if they are not steeped in alcohol, they're pretty much worthless. The active ingredients MUST be extracted with alcohol.

Their tests (in most cases) haven't worked because they don't have a clue as to what they are doing.

Sandman

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Re: Natural Antibiotic Alternatives
« Reply #4 on: June 11, 2009, 12:27:55 AM »
I continue to learn more each day, and I am open to consider alternative treatment options, but here is another interesting perspective on herbal remedies:

$2.5B spent, no alternative medicine cures found

http://www.timesrepublican.com/page/content.detail/id/517242.html?nav=5005


You can search each of your chosen remedies at the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine to help in your own search for answers:
http://nccam.nih.gov/research/results/

Cochrane Reviews:
http://www.cochrane.org/reviews/en/topics/22_reviews.html

PubMed:
%20or%20NCCAM%20[gr]&doptcmdl=Abstract]http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?db=pubmed&cmd=Search&term=AT%20[gr]%20or%20NCCAM%20[gr]&doptcmdl=Abstract

Office of Dietary Supplements:
http://ods.od.nih.gov/Health_Information/Information_About_Individual_Dietary_Supplements.aspx


Herbalism is not without its controversy, granted. And with competing studies out that show completely opposite results, it's often difficult to pinpoint reality from something else.
For instance, here's a study from your PubMed link above in support of Echinacea used for the prevention of upper respiratory viral infections:

"Induction of multiple pro-inflammatory cytokines by respiratory viruses and reversal by standardized Echinacea, a potent antiviral herbal extract."
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19409931?ordinalpos=6&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_DefaultReportPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum

And Goldenseal for instance contains berberine, which has shown antimicrobial activity against bacteria, viruses, fungi, protazoans, and others in some studies.
http://www.thorne.com/media/berberine.pdf
http://www.thorne.com/media/berberine_monograph.pdf

Also, according to N. Beascher & L. Kopanski, in their "Stimulation of immunity by the contents of Baptisia tinctoria" in Planta Med (1985), their experiments indicated that the polysaccharides & proteins in Wild Indigo are believed to stimulate the immune system.
http://myhealth.ucsd.edu/library/healthguide/en-us/Cam/topic.asp?hwid=hn-2184005#ref2

These are just a sampling of many such studies that do show the above-mentioned herbs used in treatments as efficacious against microbes. It really boils down then to which studies you want to believe, & which you do not. In many cases, the only way to know for sure then is to try them out yourself, and see first hand which are helpful, and which are not.

Good luck with your continued research. For me, it seems to be a never-ending quest for the truth. What works? What doesn't?

Peace.




« Last Edit: May 01, 2013, 01:04:37 AM by Archer »

walker

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Re: Natural Antibiotic Alternatives
« Reply #5 on: June 11, 2009, 01:12:09 AM »
Ok...ya'll are going to force me onto my anti-FDA hobby horse...

A lot of the reason that none of these tests for herbal cures have been found to be inconclusive is because;

1) The FDA is in the pocket of the pharmaceutical industry. If that industry is unable to reproduce the active ingredient synthetically so that it works like the whole herb does, then they dismiss it as being "useless". You can't patent an herb. A lot of herbs work synergically...that is to say, there are a lot of other chemicals in an herb that make it work the way it does...isolating one active ingredient that you can reproduce synthetically, doesn't mean it's going to work the way the whole herb does. And if they think they can't make money off of it...why bother?

2) I've seen details of their tests...they give some people capsules of the powdered herbs in it...a lot of herbs don't work that way...they have to be "processed" to work properly...which these testers don't bother with. Take Pau d' Arco, for example...if you don't boil it, or make a tincture with it, it will cause more problems than it fixes. Boiled, it works against viruses, like herpes. In a capsule, the raw bark, will just make things worse. Roots and barks, for the most part, have to be boiled or processed into a tincture to work. leaves and flowers have to be steeped...for the most part...berries like hawthorne, have to be deconcocted...that is to say...steeped in water for a couple days before they're worth anything. The Cohoshes are a prime example...if they are not steeped in alcohol, they're pretty much worthless. The active ingredients MUST be extracted with alcohol.

Their tests (in most cases) haven't worked because they don't have a clue as to what they are doing.

I won't argue against your viewpoint, there are valid reasons for concerns about the FDA.  I share many of the same views you share.  None of the links I provided are the FDA, the FDA does not control worldwide research found on Pubmed or the Cochrane Reviews (and includes those done in Germany, Italy, Turkey, Switzerland, Japan, etc.).  Many of the herbal products sold on store shelves in the world are made by or distributed the pharmaceutical industry, and many of the studies finding supportive evidence for herbal products are done by the world pharmaceutical industry.  Why? Because they can make money off of it, as they do all over the world. 

The grants to pay for research out of the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine are U.S. tax dollars, and they go to many alternative medicine (Natropaths, Homeopaths, Acupuncturists, etc.) researchers.  Are they all in the pocket of big pharma and the FDA?  Do all the world-wide alternative medicine researchers who publish studies not know how to properly combine or utilize herbs?  There is nothing stopping you or anyone else from conducting and publishing your research findings, or contacting those who do to discuss your views and concerns.  I have, and I am nobody important outside my little world.

I am 100% behind finding a better mousetrap in medicine, and that means looking at alternative treatments that work.  Finding them and validating them is a lengthy ongoing process.  I keep my mind open with a skeptical eye.  To me, that means sometimes changing my opinion on things I have done/been trained to do for years, even it means I diverge from commonly accepted practices.  I work with a practicing homeopath/M.D., and we discuss research together often, openly challenging each other to become sharper and better at what we do.

Bring out your research you base your treatments upon (not just a reprint from a book or article, but the published research), let us learn together, and don't feel threatened if it leads to other research that may dispute your findings.
« Last Edit: May 01, 2013, 12:24:00 AM by Archer »

walker

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Re: Natural Antibiotic Alternatives
« Reply #6 on: June 11, 2009, 02:11:36 AM »
Herbalism is not without its controversy, granted. And with competing studies out that show completely opposite results, it's often difficult to pinpoint reality from something else.
For instance, here's a study from your PubMed link above in support of Echinacea used for the prevention of upper respiratory viral infections:

"Induction of multiple pro-inflammatory cytokines by respiratory viruses and reversal by standardized Echinacea, a potent antiviral herbal extract."
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19409931?ordinalpos=6&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_DefaultReportPanel.Pubmed_RVDocSum

Right on Sandman!  Good find.  This and other research has found Echinacea to have an interesting potential role in treating respiratory illnesses.  The research you found above is an "in vitro" (think test-tube) study to help us understand the potential effects of a substance.  Although I do sometimes utilize Echinacea for respiratory illnesses in myself and others, I have not found much recent supporting "in vivo" (think living breathing animals or humans) research that has reproduced the desired results. 

Quote
And Goldenseal for instance contains berberine, which has shown antimicrobial activity against bacteria, viruses, fungi, protazoans, and others in some studies.
http://www.thorne.com/media/berberine.pdf
http://www.thorne.com/media/berberine_monograph.pdf

Another good find!  I will be reading this in detail at a later time, too late tonight.

Quote
Also, according to N. Beascher & L. Kopanski, in their "Stimulation of immunity by the contents of Baptisia tinctoria" in Planta Med (1985), their experiments indicated that the polysaccharides & proteins in Wild Indigo are believed to stimulate the immune system.
http://myhealth.ucsd.edu/library/healthguide/en-us/Cam/topic.asp?hwid=hn-2184005#ref2

This is good info on Wild Indigo, but this source you provided rates its use as "An herb is primarily supported by traditional use, or the herb or supplement has little scientific support and/or minimal health benefit."   

Quote
These are just a sampling of many such studies that do show the above-mentioned herbs used in treatments as efficacious against microbes. It really boils down then to which studies you want to believe, & which you do not. In many cases, the only way to know for sure then is to try them out yourself, and see first hand which are helpful, and which are not.
In my opinion, I would not suggest just picking what you WANT to believe, but critically analyzing all available data and developing opinion based upon your own findings compared with the findings of folks with a higher expertise of knowledge.  The amount of information can be overwhelming, this is why the Cochran reviews try to objectively take a look at all available data and crunch it down for a concise perspective.  (this is also not without it's flaws, but they are open to the world to dispute, correct, and conduct their own meta-analysis)
« Last Edit: May 01, 2013, 12:23:50 AM by Archer »

sage0925

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Re: Natural Antibiotic Alternatives
« Reply #7 on: June 11, 2009, 03:29:00 PM »
oops...I meant so many tests have been inconclusive...sorry, scotch was involved.

Offline Buffy

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Re: Natural Antibiotic Alternatives
« Reply #8 on: June 11, 2009, 04:15:00 PM »
Single malt or blend?

Goatdog62

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Re: Natural Antibiotic Alternatives
« Reply #9 on: June 11, 2009, 04:17:33 PM »
This is a thread of great value to me.

+1 Sandman!

Offline Buffy

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Re: Natural Antibiotic Alternatives
« Reply #10 on: June 11, 2009, 04:18:40 PM »
If  there is a possibility that you might only have herbal medicine, it doesn't hurt to learn something about it.
Even if you have meds stockpiled, there is the chance that you will run out.

Goatdog62

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Re: Natural Antibiotic Alternatives
« Reply #11 on: June 11, 2009, 04:26:27 PM »
If  there is a possibility that you might only have herbal medicine, it doesn't hurt to learn something about it.
Even if you have meds stockpiled, there is the chance that you will run out.

Absolutely. I have been in locales, involving hostile areas, where no friendly meds were available. Natural/alternative remedy knowledge is something I got interested in really quickly after that.

If you could recommend just one book on herbals what would it be? Forgive me if this was answered already, I might have missed it.
« Last Edit: June 12, 2009, 11:54:11 AM by Goatdog62 »

Sandman

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Re: Natural Antibiotic Alternatives
« Reply #12 on: June 11, 2009, 09:16:24 PM »
Absolutely. I have been in locales, involving hostile areas, where no friendly meds were available. Natural/alternative remedy knowledge is something I got inetrested in really quickly after that.

If you could recommend just one book on herbals what would it be? Forgive me if this was answered already, I might have missed it.
Thanks for the bump!

My favorite, all-around book on alternative medicine is: Alternative Medicine: The Definitive Guide.  It covers many different forms of non-allopathic medicine, not just herbal medicine. Personally, I stick mostly with herbals.
http://www.amazon.com/Alternative-Medicine-Definitive-Guide-2nd/dp/1587611414/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1244775797&sr=1-1

For a favorite technical reference on herbals, I like: The Essential Book of Herbal Medicine. It's a bit dry & nerdy for any laymen readers though.
http://www.amazon.com/Essential-Book-Herbal-Medicine-Arkana/dp/014019309X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1244776422&sr=1-1





Goatdog62

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Re: Natural Antibiotic Alternatives
« Reply #13 on: June 12, 2009, 11:55:11 AM »
Thanks for the bump!

My favorite, all-around book on alternative medicine is: Alternative Medicine: The Definitive Guide.  It covers many different forms of non-allopathic medicine, not just herbal medicine. Personally, I stick mostly with herbals.
http://www.amazon.com/Alternative-Medicine-Definitive-Guide-2nd/dp/1587611414/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1244775797&sr=1-1

For a favorite technical reference on herbals, I like: The Essential Book of Herbal Medicine. It's a bit dry & nerdy for any laymen readers though.
http://www.amazon.com/Essential-Book-Herbal-Medicine-Arkana/dp/014019309X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1244776422&sr=1-1


Awesome Sandman! I'll order it today.

Offline Doug

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Offline DarkEyes

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Re: Natural Antibiotic Alternatives
« Reply #15 on: June 21, 2009, 08:17:10 AM »
Don't forget, you can go to the pet store and get antibiotics in the fish department. "fish mox". It comes in 250mg little plastic bags.  When I read this, I went around the corner, and was shocked that it was actually on the shelf.  I don't know if it actually works, I've read that it does, but I haven't tried it.  You would need to know how much to give per pound and for what length of time.

Goatdog62

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Re: Natural Antibiotic Alternatives
« Reply #16 on: June 21, 2009, 08:24:28 AM »
Don't forget, you can go to the pet store and get antibiotics in the fish department. "fish mox". It comes in 250mg little plastic bags.  When I read this, I went around the corner, and was shocked that it was actually on the shelf.  I don't know if it actually works, I've read that it does, but I haven't tried it.  You would need to know how much to give per pound and for what length of time.

Yep, on another post I told of how I used livestock antibiotics in the powder form to cure myself (tetracycline). It was a desperate move in a critical situation. I did purchase some more recently and made it part of my preps.

eric89

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Re: Natural Antibiotic Alternatives
« Reply #17 on: August 16, 2009, 09:38:26 PM »
I have used oregano oil and olive leaf and was impressed with both. 

Also take a look at Sambucus extract from elderberry, the extract has been proven to do well against the flu.

Echinacea - I have heard that this works well, but the body builds up a tolerance against it, so it is possible to take too much of it.

But then, can't the body build up a tolerance against anything if it is taken too much?

-Eric

Offline JHill

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Re: Natural Antibiotic Alternatives
« Reply #18 on: August 23, 2009, 12:43:30 PM »
A big +1 to essential oils--many are very potent against molds. fungus, viruses, and bacteria.  Topical and internal.

Notsonutso

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Re: Natural Antibiotic Alternatives
« Reply #19 on: August 24, 2009, 09:28:01 AM »

The one remedy I will not be without is Tea Tree Oil, for all external parts.  Works great on cuts and rashes and bug bites.  I have gotten rid of warts and it cures athlete foot almost over night.

Offline cougar

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Re: Natural Antibiotic Alternatives
« Reply #20 on: August 24, 2009, 10:39:23 AM »
The best natural treatment you can get is to take care of your body with healthy food, avoid sugar/processed foods/smoking, etc.  A healthy immune system does more against infection than all the drugs in the world.
That being said, colloidal silver is a great antibiotic.  It works as an antifungal as well.  Colloidal silver nasal spray is used for chronic sinusitis (mayo clinic studies have shown the majority of chronic sinusitis is fungal...one reason antibiotics dont work).  Works well as a topic antibiotic and in vitro is antiviral/antibacterial/antifungal.  Some folks take it orally but i have not seen research to back it up as a systemic.
Can't grow it in your garden but it is still natural.

Offline Cave Dweller

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Re: Natural Antibiotic Alternatives
« Reply #21 on: August 24, 2009, 12:13:04 PM »
Nice, Thanks.

Offline kiteflyer

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Re: Natural Antibiotic Alternatives
« Reply #22 on: August 24, 2009, 04:33:51 PM »

   Ancient Egyptians used wild honey for wounds. The old becomes the new once again!

              kiteflyer

        http://apitherapy.blogspot.com/2009/07/honey-effective-against-antibiotic.html

Offline Cave Dweller

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Re: Natural Antibiotic Alternatives
« Reply #23 on: August 28, 2009, 12:05:30 AM »
I don't remember where I found this, but here it is.

Take it with a really big grain of salt.

Penicillin "Recipe"
Quote
CULTURE OF PENICILLIN
USE ASEPTIC TECHNIQUE THROUGHOUT THIS PROCEDURE
Step 1
Prepare a penicillium culture by exposing a slice of bread or citrus peel to the air at 70 deg. F until a bluish-green mold develops.
Cut two slices of whole wheat bread into ½ inch cubes and place in a 750ml Erlenmeyer flask with a cotton (non-absorbent) plug. It is important that the bread does not contain any mold inhibitors such as “mycoban”. Sterilize the flask and contents in a pressure cooker for at least 15 minutes at 15 pounds. An alternate method is to place in an oven at 315 deg F for one hour.
Using a sterile transfer loop (flamed) transfer the spores from the bread or peel into the flask containing the bread cubes.
Allow the cubes to incubate in the dark at 70 deg F for 5 days. After incubation, store in the refrigerator for not longer than two weeks.
Step 2
Prepare one liter of the following media:
? Lactose Monohydrate 44.0 gm
? Corn Starch 25.0 gm
? Sodium Nitrate 3.0 gm
? Magnesium Sulfate 0.25 gm
? Potassium Phosphate Mono 0.50 gm
? Glucose Monohydrate 2.75 gm
? Zinc Sulfate 0.044 gm
? Manganese Sulfate 0.044 gm
Dissolve in order in 500ml of cold tap water and add sufficient cold tap water to make one liter.
Adjust pH to 5.0-5.5 using HCL. Fill a series of milk bottles with a quantity of this media. Use only enough media so that when the bottle is placed on its side the media will not touch the cotton plug.
Sterilize the bottles and media in a pressure cooker or stove as previously outlined. When cool, inoculate with spores from the bread cubes. Use approximately the equivalent of one tablespoon.
Allow bottles to incubate on their sides at 70 deg F for 7 days. It is important that the bottles are not disturbed during this time. At the end of 7 days if your culture is capable of producing penicillin it will be dispersed in the liquid portion of the media.
Filter fermentation media, plug with cotton and refrigerate immediately. Use as soon as possible.
Step 3
To extract the penicillin the following procedure may be attempted. Do the following technique as rapidly as possible.
Adjust the cold fermentation filtrate to pH 2.2 using .01/N HCL. Mix cold filtrate with cold ethyl acetate in a separatory funnel and shake well for 30 seconds.
Drain the ethyl acetate into a beaker which has been placed in an ice bath and repeat the process until all filtrate is depleted.
Add 1% potassium acetate and mix. Permit ethyl acetate (flammable) to evaporate. This can be induced by a constant flow of air over the top of the beaker.
The remaining crystals are a mixture of potassium penicillin and potassium acetate.
WARNING: DO THE EXTRACTION AS RAPIDLY AS POSSIBLE!

Another warning, I remember something about early penicillin causing a ringing of the ears disorder, tinnitus I think.
But it's better than visiting the ancestors when you still have stuff to do.

Offline Orionblade

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Re: Natural Antibiotic Alternatives
« Reply #24 on: November 01, 2009, 11:17:45 PM »
Lots of antibiotics can cause auditory problems. I was on Zithromax for a while and noticed my hearing got a little fuzzy, but recovered within a month.

I keep some ionic silver solution on hand in a cobalt blue bottle to avoid photoreduction, at about 15ppm concentration IIRC. I also have a nebulizer and a generator that I scored as part of my compensation for a consulting gig a while back.

I keep some topical antibiotic and anti fungals on hand, and I'll be picking up some surgical soap for that sort of thing too.

A friend mentioned goldenseal as being a good natural antimicrobial alternative. Anyone have info on that?

The silver kit I have kicks ass, and would reccomend it to anyone, but I do not reccomend daily oral dosing of CS or ionic silver to anyone for any reason unless you are under GRAVE risk of infection. I don't have any solid data on long term toxicity or urine clearance, although I do have some data on urine clearance that I asked that the fellow I consulted for get before I continued helping him - it appears that everything you take in ionic form passes out through the urine, so I deemed it safe enough to use myself.

Inhalation seems the best bet, since all the uses commercially that I've seen are topical. Creams, ointments, and even bandages now contain silver for dealing with infection and wound healing issues. I also used silver electrodes almost exclusively in my in-vivo biological experiments when I was doing lab time, since they were the only electrode whose half-reactions didn't include anything toxic to mammals, and they were inherently antimicrobial.

I have a couple of posts tonight on ionic silver - I saw a post noting Alex Jones and CS mentioned in the same sentence and it sent up some alarm bells. The fellow I know has an ad running this month on there, but so does a competitor that makes some really alarmingly dangerous claims about silver's effectiveness against swine flu and HIV/AIDS. Not cool in my book - the whole false hope thing kinda pisses me off to no end.

There are plenty of suppliers of silver out there, though, so by no means should you take my word for it - I did, however, consult on his production process and optimized for product quality and purity - I do good work, so it's about the best there is on earth, if I do say so myself. ;-) I don't know any other place to get a little bitty nebulizer, though, so check the page out and maybe pick one up - they're durable and dead nuts reliable, and one-button operation, so it pretty much kicks ass. Anyone that's interested can PM me for a link - not sure about posting rules and advertising and all that jazz.

Further kick ass and a +1 for the penicillin extraction.

Orion


Offline Cave Dweller

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Re: Natural Antibiotic Alternatives
« Reply #25 on: November 13, 2009, 02:50:58 PM »

Further kick ass and a +1 for the penicillin extraction.

Orion


Hey, let me know if it works.

Offline Orionblade

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Re: Natural Antibiotic Alternatives
« Reply #26 on: November 13, 2009, 06:43:01 PM »
I have second-hand access to GCMS and IR spec machines @ school, so I might run up to the organic chem department and say "hey, lemme do this and test 'er out?"

If not, then I have to take an organic chem lab in the spring, so I should be able to do the extraction during open lab hours. Been planning on putting together a full wet lab home office with a fume hood, incubators and 18 MegaOhm water supply when I finish off my attic sometime over the winter, so I can certainly grow the goo.

Offline fndrbndr

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Re: Natural Antibiotic Alternatives
« Reply #27 on: April 16, 2012, 08:46:19 AM »
Don't forget, you can go to the pet store and get antibiotics in the fish department. "fish mox". It comes in 250mg little plastic bags.  When I read this, I went around the corner, and was shocked that it was actually on the shelf.  I don't know if it actually works, I've read that it does, but I haven't tried it.  You would need to know how much to give per pound and for what length of time.

I'm about to buy some of this...here's a good video overview. Looks identical to the "human" variety:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=16C_KVNLo7U

Offline Orionblade

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Re: Natural Antibiotic Alternatives
« Reply #28 on: May 07, 2012, 03:07:37 PM »
Of note - blueberries and/or their juice is a GREAT remedy for peptic ulcers. Anthocyanins in the berries, amongst other chemicals, tend to inhibit bacterial activity. Not so great as an antifungal, as they'll still ferment (yeast is eukaryotic, vs. prokaryotic bacteria) but it's a wonderful remedy for all sorts of things.

Strangely, it's also pretty good for thrush, so long as you don't sweeten the juice with extra sugar. Not to be used as a replacement for any other treatment, or without consulting a physician for side-effects or interactions with prescribed treatment regimens.

Offline technicalanarchy

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Re: Natural Antibiotic Alternatives
« Reply #29 on: May 07, 2012, 05:23:44 PM »
Local raw honey is great for burns. I know from personal experience. Even an NIH study said so.