Author Topic: Talking Whisk(e)y  (Read 7433 times)

osubuckeye4

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Re: Talking Whisk(e)y
« Reply #30 on: October 04, 2017, 08:39:48 AM »
It's not everyone's cup of tea, but I'm a fan of Monkey Shoulder.

It doesn't break the bank, it's smooth, and it's easy to sip on.


If I'm looking to break the bank I'll grab some Blue Label.. but those trips to the liquor store are pretty few and far between.



One of my buddies was asking me about scotch the other weekend and it was funny. Conversation went like this:

Him: "So, what's the best type of scotch that you'd recommend?"
Me: "That's tough to say, what do you look for in a scotch?"
Him: "I don't know, I usually just mix it with Pepsi"
Me: "Ok then, buy the largest and cheapest bottle possible..."
Him: "What about the taste? I want something that tastes good."
Me: "If you don't like the taste, just add more Pepsi."

Offline fritz_monroe

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Re: Talking Whisk(e)y
« Reply #31 on: October 04, 2017, 10:59:22 AM »
I'm not a rye drinker.  But there's a newer local rye producer here in Maryland. 

Sagamore Spirits is supposed to be really good.  That's the guy from Under Armor.

Offline David in MN

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Re: Talking Whisk(e)y
« Reply #32 on: December 06, 2017, 08:52:31 PM »
Larceny Bourbon...

It's a Heaven Hill (my favorite Bourbon distillery) and it's worth the price  :-\. (Others are better than their price from Heaven Hill.)

It's good. Missing some oil (my preference) but if you like a rich, sweet bourbon that makes you think of ? toasted nuts and honestly grapenuts with maybe a little tropical fruit it's a solid choice. Wheat is obvious.

I can't help but think this is conforming to the market. Cheap grain bill and sweet. And these guys make Elijah Craig 12 year... One of my top ten whiskies. And Evan Williams Single Barrel which is a great value if you like charred toast.

What can I say. Worth the price.

Offline David in MN

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Re: Talking Whisk(e)y
« Reply #33 on: January 23, 2018, 05:21:58 PM »
Another odd recommendation... Kirkland 10 Year Tawny Porto.

I'm a Porto snob. I used to collect vintages when I was in my 20s (before having a kid). This will in no way compare to a vintage Kopke Colheita. But it's a damn fine Tawny for $16. It's basic. Garnet color and all the flavors are right. No great depth and the alcohol is too hot but it's solid. A good competitor to my favorite budget Porto Noval's LBV. I prefer the structure of a bottle aged but this Tawny will not disappoint. And you won't feel guilty for drinking it!

You could do a lot worse on Valentine's than have a solid Porto and great chocolates (I'd prefer Gorgonzola or Shropshire but who's counting). I think most couples would benefit from a night of Porto and exotic chocolates.

Offline outoforder2day

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Re: Talking Whisk(e)y
« Reply #34 on: January 24, 2018, 10:09:06 AM »
Honestly have a hard time finding exceptional ports here in PA. My usual is either Bin 27 or Taylor Fladgate. My wife went to Porto and brought back a bottle of something phenominal, though. I'll see if I can get the name.
Now I want port...

Found a bottle of Clyde May's straight bourbon whiskey. Very tasty on it's own, but mixes surprisingly well.

Offline Mr. Bill

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Re: Talking Whisk(e)y
« Reply #35 on: January 24, 2018, 06:18:14 PM »
...Kopke Colheita...

My wife and I did actually try that during our year of being Port enthusiasts.  One of our favorites, according to my old notes.

I tend to prefer Ruby Port -- it reminds me of the Manischewitz and Mogen David we used to have when I was a kid. 8)

Offline David in MN

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Re: Talking Whisk(e)y
« Reply #36 on: July 23, 2018, 07:11:47 PM »
Tried another one for the rye drinkers recently. Anchor's Old Potrero. I'm not quite sure if the juice is worth the squeeze compared to Bulleit. I wanted to bring something interesting to share and it was a hit. If you're keen on trying an explosive youthful rye it might be worth the price tag. It's so intense in flavor without being harsh it becomes very difficult to drink and a couple ounces will last an hour as one sips and ponders all the flavors. It's the Islay of the rye world. Not for the faint of heart.

Offline Alan Georges

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Re: Talking Whisk(e)y
« Reply #37 on: July 23, 2018, 07:34:23 PM »

Offline David in MN

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Re: Talking Whisk(e)y
« Reply #38 on: July 28, 2018, 08:45:52 AM »
ALright, it's time to go deep. I've been allowing myself one drink per day and it's been in the form of single malt Scotch after the family goes to bed. I've shared before that I am in love with the Scotches of Islay (pronounced eye-luh) and have that hasn't changed. Early on I fell in love with Bruichladdich and for years the Bowmore 15 has been my favorite. Ardbeg was a close second in all its versions.

Then I bit the bullet and payed $70 for the big daddy. Lagavulin 16. You can even drink it with Nick Offerman on his "Yule Log" on Youtube:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LS-ErOKpO4E&has_verified=1

This is NOT a beginner's dram. Holy cow there are some flavors between the smoke and peat but it's a challenging whisky and not for the faint of heart. It's a full frontal of Islay. While Ardbeg twists and turns and 10 minutes after your first sip you'll be confused at what you just tasted and Bruichladdich will have you picking your teeth for seaweed  Lagavulin is just a punch in the face that disappears with a cooling (mint?) finish that begs you to drink more. And it noses with that seductive sherry cask I love in Scotch. In one sip it's like burning a sherry cask on a peat campfire and having a bucket of cold lake water thrown in your face. Amazing stuff.

If you have "whiskey" friends any of the above will garner respect (unless they are idiots who think the highlight of Scotch is Macallan 12 or Glenfiddich) and as always friends don't let friends drink Canadian whiskey (it sucks).

Offline atherts

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Re: Talking Whisk(e)y
« Reply #39 on: July 31, 2018, 12:25:04 PM »
A word of advice based on recent experience. If you have the opportunity to share a 1.75l bottle of Bullit Rye on a blazing hot day, standing over the grill for 3 hours with access to unlimited ice...

1. Make sure you are sharing
2. Drink a lot of water
3. Use a small glass

That was Saturday, I'm starting to feel better now. It sure went down smoothly from what I can remember.

Offline David in MN

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Re: Talking Whisk(e)y
« Reply #40 on: July 31, 2018, 01:05:51 PM »
I only use the Glencairn Whisky Glass:

https://www.glencairnwhiskyglass.com/

You can find it on Amazon. There is, in my experience, no better way of sampling a dram of good whisk(e)y. It is optimized for color, nose, and taste. And it's really, really little.  ;) Oh, sure I've got a set of massive rocks tumblers for campfires but this little flute really is the way to go.

Offline Alan Georges

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Re: Talking Whisk(e)y
« Reply #41 on: July 31, 2018, 05:42:41 PM »
A word of advice based on recent experience. If you have the opportunity to share a 1.75l bottle of Bullit Rye ...
It comes in 1.75's?!?!
This is a good world.

Offline David in MN

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Re: Talking Whisk(e)y
« Reply #42 on: September 02, 2018, 09:06:06 AM »
I got another oddball for the bourbon fans. I had my first sip last night and it took 2 hours to drink 1.5 ounces. Something you really want to go slow with and contemplate.

Angel's Envy

https://www.angelsenvy.com/

It's a bourbon that is finished in port barrels. It goes through waves of flavors, nosing like fruits and having a chocolate raisin toffee cake thing about it but I swear the finish has just a hint of port on the back. It's not a beginner whiskey but any fan of bourbon might like this subtle change in character. I think I paid $45 so it's not a massive risk, either. I'm told it was better years ago when it was independent (now owned by Constellation I think) but it's still solid.


Offline David in MN

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Re: Talking Whisk(e)y
« Reply #43 on: September 03, 2018, 06:46:50 PM »
In continuing my journey of great drams tonight I am partaking in Highland Park 12 year Viking Honour. For those who don't know the Orkney Islands on the north shores of Scotland were settled (conquered) by Vikings. To this day Nordic names are common and the heritage is alive.

Leave it to a Viking region to produce a single malt known for bright flowers and heather honey. Just get over that mild peat hurdle and it's sweet sailing from there. Sniff, sip, and finish are all fresh and sweet. It's like the best of Viking flavor. Perhaps the land knows its history?

Highland Park is one of my favorite distilleries and while not a great scorer it has its own unique flavor and is a fantastic beginner single malt. Far from the boring Highland and Speyside styles (sorry if you love them) it has character. Some smoke and peat but ultimately sweet and indulgent. If you waant to try a single malt and don't want a Glenfiddich, Macallan, Balvenie, or Glenmorangie (all of which have interesting bottlings for much more money) try a Highland Park. It's Scotch made by Vikings.

Offline cannonball

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Re: Talking Whisk(e)y
« Reply #44 on: September 05, 2018, 09:39:16 AM »
I have been really impressed with everything that High West has put out. Bourbon our of Utah, who'd a thunk...

For Scotch I like Johnny Walker Double Black

Offline David in MN

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Re: Talking Whisk(e)y
« Reply #45 on: September 06, 2018, 01:07:37 PM »
I have been really impressed with everything that High West has put out. Bourbon our of Utah, who'd a thunk...

For Scotch I like Johnny Walker Double Black

Don't have High West around here but I do keep a bottle of either Black or Double Black at all times. In truth I'm hard pressed to choose a favorite because both are great. I will say that Double Black is the gateway to Islay.

Serendipity struck at Costco. Found a bottle of Nikka Coffey Grain Whisky. I actually like Japanese whisky so this is a good find. Haven't tasted yet but I cracked the bottle for a smell. Smells like rum.... Dad used to get Suntory Yamazaki 18 for special days and I grew a fondness for Japanese made whisky. If you ever feel stifled that Scotch is 100% barley and Bourbon is 100% new oak cask try Japanese spirits. They do whatever grain bill they want and age as they want. No rules, just great whisky.

Offline David in MN

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Re: Talking Whisk(e)y
« Reply #46 on: September 18, 2018, 08:51:13 AM »
Nikka Coffey is definitely an oddball. I waited to try it a couple times and to be frank it's a little too far on the rum spectrum for me. Not that it's bad or undrinkable. I actually really enjjoyed the softness of the grain and found just a hint of oak bitterness. It's awesome for a beginner and if you're looking for an easy dram of something out of left field try it. A fellow whiskey snob calls it "bourbon aged like Scotch". Apt. If you like "sweet" look no further.

Had another interesting beginner Scotch this weekend courtesy of family. Monkey Shoulder is a blended Scotch that noses of butter and caramel and ttastes of heather honey. If you like Highland Scotch (and I generally do not) at $30 a bottle it's very solid and a good introductory whisky. It's very light and clean if you like that sort of thing. For the price point in a blend I think I'd still take a Johnnie Walker Black (or Double Black) but I could see a fan of lighter Scotches really enjoying it. Upon first sip I proclaimed Balvenie. I was, upon searching, part correct. Balvenie, Glenfiddich, and Kininvie are the source for the blend. If that sounds palatable to you, I do not think you'll be disappointed.

Offline cannonball

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Re: Talking Whisk(e)y
« Reply #47 on: September 19, 2018, 08:34:49 AM »
I haven't had a scotch in about a year (have been drinking bourbon). I had this post in my head as I went to pour a drink last night and decided to grab the double black. On the first sip the sweet, smoky, tobacco flavors were almost too much. Not bad, just different from the ryes and bourbons I had become used to.

Offline Chemsoldier

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Re: Talking Whisk(e)y
« Reply #48 on: September 19, 2018, 07:51:21 PM »
I am drinking a Brandy Old Fashioned at the moment. Is that big in MN? It is in WI.

Offline David in MN

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Re: Talking Whisk(e)y
« Reply #49 on: September 20, 2018, 08:32:30 AM »
I am drinking a Brandy Old Fashioned at the moment. Is that big in MN? It is in WI.

Nope. That is straight up Sconnie. I haven't had one of those in probably 15 years. I remember my parents preparing for cocktail parties by peeling a dozen oranges (because us classy folk like an orange peel in the glass). A brandy old fashioned sweet is like THE drink of the corner bar in Wisconsin.

Oh I wish I could convey how much I'm laughing. It reminds me of my great aunt in Chicago who always did a punch of vodka, ginger ale, and sherbet. And always grasshoppers after dinner. I remember listening to my uncles talk about sneaking the punch while me and my cousins were sneaking the punch!

I more took to my grandparents who were on both sides bourbon drinkers. But man, does a brandy old fashioned take me back to my early days. I mean that's like my dad and his veteran buddies playing cards. They used to make me a Shirley Temple in the highball glass and I thought I was cool. That's a reaal throwback.

I appreciate the memory hole. That brings me back. I really need to hit up church and light a few candles. I miss those days and those people.