Author Topic: Don's Rechargeable Battery Guide  (Read 1916 times)

Offline DonC

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Don's Rechargeable Battery Guide
« on: October 05, 2017, 01:58:48 AM »
Over the past couple years, I've had an opportunity to test several different
rechargeable batteries, from several different companies. So, I got with Carl
and came up with a list and why we choose these batteries. Suffice to say, our
"trial & error" is your benefit. The links I provided below are for "picture"
purposes only. you can search and find them a tad cheaper. I just selected the
1st result that popped up for reference.

It is important to remember that 2500-2800mah is the safest capacity to purchase.
Much over that and you run the risk of re-branded/re-built foreign crap with new
shrink wrap over old batteries.

For the 18650 batteries, (a popular choice for radio to be sure), you will want to
use "Button-top" protected batteries. These tend to be safer against unwanted
results. NOTE: I can't stress this enough, anything with the word "Fire" in the
name is re-branded junk, with very limited useful life. They're popular because
they tend to be the cheapest brand batteries and very inviting. Cheap is not always
better. As is the case when it comes to batteries and the expense of several electronic devices
we put them in. Unless you can easily afford to replace the devices when they
burn up.



18650 3.7V NTE 2800mah Button-top cells:

EBL: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00DNPT1D6/ref=asc_df_B00DNPT1D65201041/?tag=hyprod-20&creative=395033&creativeASIN=B00DNPT1D6&linkCode=df0&hvadid=167129443640&hvpos=1o1&hvnetw=g&hvrand=3015596320248252608&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9059053&hvtargid=pla-305982328723

EFEST: https://liionwholesale.com/products/efest-imr-18650-2500mah-li-mn-button-top-batteries?variant=1023366900

SAMSUNG: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00NUI46HM/ref=psdc_10112773011_t1_B00NUI45AU

ODEC: amazon.com search



AA,AAA NTE 2500mah:

ENELOOP: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00KQ2NA68/ref=asc_df_B00KQ2NA685201041/?tag=hyprod-20&creative=395033&creativeASIN=B00KQ2NA68&linkCode=df0&hvadid=167134408017&hvpos=1o3&hvnetw=g&hvrand=8143006076415185608&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9059053&hvtargid=pla-310359426177


AA,AAA,C,D,9V:

TENERGY LSD: https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_2?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=tenergy+lsd+c

NOTE: LSD = Low Self Discharge. They work well in devices, however, they
do not tend to store well and have to be cycled every few months to maintain
their maximum effectiveness.

Now sure, arguments can be made about brand, price, etc. Knock yourself out. I'm not saying buy these or else. I'm simply saying this is what has worked for
me over the years. They're tested, tried and true. I did the work so you don't have to. I won't trust my devices to just any old foreign POS.

As for chargers for these batteries, I recommend slow charging/maintaining any of these batteries. Quickly charging these batteries only shortens their usefulness.

Offline NWPilgrim

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Re: Don's Rechargeable Battery Guide
« Reply #1 on: October 05, 2017, 03:08:59 AM »
What others did you test that you do not recommend?

About 18650 batteries:  It appears that you are recommending non-protected cells, correct?  What about Panasonic and Samsung branded ones?  I would think those would be excellent.  Under what conditions is it safe to use unprotected cells?  I have been buying Orbtronic 3400mAh protected cells just to be safe under all conditions.  I mainly use them for Fenix flashlights and headlamps.  I recharge with a Xtar VP4 Dragon.  Am I spending more than needed getting protected cells?  I currently pay $13-$15/cell for the Orbtronic.  I seem to remember I can get the Panasonic unprotected 3400mAh for under $6.  Are not big name brands such as Panasonic and Samsung not safe to buy in the 3400mAh range?

About AA batteries: Currently I buy only Enloop 1900mAh cells.  Is there are trade off in longevity or something to go with the Pro series at 2500mAh?  Same as with Tenergy, they have the normal ones in the 1900 range but offer a premium model in the 2500mAh range.  Is the difference just the initial cost, or do the higher power ones burn out faster?  I have read that Amazon Basic batteries appear and test the same as Enloop batteries (both made in Japan).  The Amazon basics are quite a bit cheaper, but do you know if they last as long?

I like to have batteries that I can totally depend on, and I don't mind paying a little more to ensure I have top quality and maximum capacity balanced with longevity. Do you think it is safe for me to switch to unprotected 18650 cells?  Any reason to keep buying Enloop instead of Amazon Basic?  (I prefer Japan made versus China when given a choice)

Thanks for starting this discussion, Don!  We are fortunate to have so many good options to choose from, but it is great to get hands-on info about what works and does not work over the long haul.

Offline DonC

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Re: Don's Rechargeable Battery Guide
« Reply #2 on: October 05, 2017, 03:20:21 AM »
What others did you test that you do not recommend?

About 18650 batteries:  It appears that you are recommending non-protected cells, correct? 

To answer the most important question, no, I do not recommend unprotected cells. The protected cells are important in my opinion!

As for others tested, Energizer, Amazon basics, are a couple. I'd rather not list bad ones to avoid confusion for others. I don't remember the others as it's been awhile since I went with Eneloops and Tenergy cells.

Paying a little more for quality is well and good. As long as it doesn't break your bank. Personally, I cannot and must be a bit more thrifty. Which is what prompted this post initially.

Just be cautious that you're not overpaying for something you can get at a more reasonable price without sacrificing quality.

I agree completely! There are many options. And it is my hope that this post will save someone from making a mistake.

The list of batteries I provided are from Carl and I. They're in the order of quality based on our preferences and their quality.

Thank you for commenting! I enjoy posting my experiences and will continue to do so as long as I'm helping.

Online Carl

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Re: Don's Rechargeable Battery Guide
« Reply #3 on: October 05, 2017, 06:30:40 AM »
  About AA ENELOOP,
  I also have found that the higher rated cells,above 2000 Mah,are not as capable when high power devices are used.
When 1/2 Amp current and above are needed ,the 1900-2000 Mah eneloop performs better than the higher rated cells,in my opinions.
All four generations and the change in manufacturing ,brand name,have not degraded the construction or performance of these cells.
To not stress the cells and make them heat,I charge at 1/2 amp (500 Milli Amp) or less and have only lost 4 cells when a charger went crazy.
I still have first generation ENELOOP cells in use over 7 years old and use them in every device from remote control,clocks,lights,cameras and flash units to even places they don't fit like some radios that require "C" or "D" size adapters and as I simply replace low cells and charge in a charger that charges one cell at a time ,instead of 2 in pairs,I always get complete charging of the cells ,no matter what their state of discharge. A charge with one cell per charge channel is not critical when charging cells discharged in the same device but with a charge channel for each cell,you don't have problems when charging cells that came from devices that use single or three cells to operate.

  The La Crosse Technology chargers (I currently use the BC-700) allow for individual cell charging,selectable (250/500MA,and 1 Amp and above) charge rates plus a "REFRESH" mode that charges and discharges to recover low capacity cells and even a TEST MODE that will tell you the capacity of the cells being tested...I don't refresh or test cells unless I suspect a problem as it takes some time to perform this tack.

 

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Re: Don's Rechargeable Battery Guide
« Reply #4 on: October 05, 2017, 07:34:56 AM »
  AMAZON BASICS "AA" has only been tested for a bit over two years by me and while they have the same listed capacity ,though not as good a capacity vs time stored ,I can't say I believe the words "same electrically as 1st Generation ENELOOP" as the eight test cells I have already lack consistency of charge capacity. They may indeed be 'old' or seconds of the ENELOOP...but for the price difference,I will stick to a known value.

18-650 and the links above are examples of each brand as many are flat top ,button top,and with or without protection circuits...the important thing is to used accepted brands ,not just the links listed as examples. Avoid great prices as I rarely get the best economy from the lowest price cells as they fail well before the name brand cells and RELIABILITY plus CONSISTENCY are important as is economy of operational life.

  When more than one such cell is used and either in series or parallel , it is important to have cells of the same ACTUAL CAPACITY so as to avion fire and other problems within your costly gear. I tested many brands and re-brands before deciding on NAME BRAND cells above as being higher initial cost though less operational lifetime cost and less probability of charge and discharge issues that can result in damage to equipment...gear and personal equipment can occur when a cell catastrophically fails and your pack ,charger,or pocket becomes a blazing inferno.

  I currently favor the INTELLICHARGER I4 from NITECORE as it individually charges many different Lithium Ion cells and also works for AA,C,and a few other cells and is AC or 12 Volt DC powered. While it is not the best for AA cells ,it is acceptable when you can just have one charger.NOTE that this manufacture of charger is often sold under many brand names and I find little importance in the name on the outside.

Offline Skispcs

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Re: Don's Rechargeable Battery Guide
« Reply #5 on: October 05, 2017, 11:34:49 AM »
The Eneloop name is now owned by Panasonic and they use batteries made in China.
Current generation are still decent but they are not what they used to be.

Panasonic bought Sanyo and got the Eneloop name but they sold the actual battery factory to Fujitsu.
https://www.filterjoe.com/2016/02/04/best-aa-batteries-and-chargers-2016/#Factory

The absolute best AAA and AA rechargeables are Fujitsu.

Offline Ralph

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Re: Don's Rechargeable Battery Guide
« Reply #6 on: August 20, 2018, 09:10:40 AM »
I did a search on EBL and came across this new thread.  I recently bought a sampling of EBL batteries.  The first 4 were 18650s.  I didn't put them on a scale yet, but they seem shorter than all my other 18650s.  They are probably unprotected and the manufacturer does not claim they are protected.  I ran them thru the CBA once but they had not been thru a single charge/ discharge yet.  They did not come up to their ratings testing at 2 amps (Carl, I still chuckle about your comment of trying to start a car with them), the estimated maximum draw of my EDC light on high.

I also ordered EBL's AA and AAA NiMH cells.  With only a couple cycles on them I ran them thru the CBA.  The AAAs at 0.5A came up a little over 800 mAHr.  The AAs at 1A came up a bit over 2AHr.  The cells came up very consistent for each size cell to cell.  Out of curiosity I took a random sampling of AA and AAA Eneloops.  The Eneloop AAAs at 0.5A tested around 650mAHr, the AAs at 2A varied from 1.3 to 1.7AHr.  The Eneloop AAs varied in age and generations which may account for their capacity spread.

The EBL NiMHs are new with only a couple cycles on them so far, but they appear to have a somewhat higher capacity than Eneloops.  I have no idea how they will hold up with age.  As far as price they are relatively cheap, especially as the order quantity goes up.  It may also be worth noting that my initial testing of the 4 18650s came up with low capacity.  I contacted the manufacturer thru Amazon and got a reply the same day offering to replace all 4 cells.  It turned out my 18650 battery holder was at fault and I notified the manufacturer that replacements were not needed.  It appears EBL also has good customer service if it is needed.

I didn't need the additional batteries but curiosity got the better of me.  To find something for some of my 18650s to do I bought a E3S battery box by Soshine which holds 4 18650s.  I put the 4 EBL 18650s in it.  That combo measures at 5900mAHr on discharge, about 8700 to recharge using a USB tester.  The box is on the large size compared to made for the purpose battery banks, but it has a backlit display for each cell's charge level and can run with or charge 1 to 4 cells.  I'll post the CBA 18650 results after I run the tests.

EBL's apparently unprotected 18650s may be a deal breaker in spite of their price, but their NiMH cells seem worth looking into.  If anyone has any experience with EBLs I would be curious to hear about it.

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Re: Don's Rechargeable Battery Guide
« Reply #7 on: August 20, 2018, 09:41:16 AM »
  I have found that ENELOOPS are still better but our testings disagree due to the test and load criteria. I test AA rechargeable at 1 Amp as this is consistent with maximum per cell discharge of the devices I use as few cells are designed for Capacity discharge in one hour...a portable device is just not so much useful if it fails to function withing one hour (except for my 50 watt plasma rifle)The internal resistance restricts the level of discharge on any cell or battery. The ENELOOP AA is rated at 500 MAH discharge and holds up well at 1 AMP...Note that older tech of NiCad cells were capable of much higher discharge rates.  I don't disagree with your test results ,only that it might be a tad too high for the current construction of the Eneloop cells and while you test all equal....not all are designed to meet you expected standards.

https://www.panasonic.com/global/consumer/battery/eneloop/technologies.html

  I have respect for 18-650 cells,though as yet not enough exposure to develop an opinion (beyond they are good in single cell lights. EBL as a brand has been acceptable for my use and some friends ...but the AA and AAA Eneloop are still my 'go to' cells and consistency in use (even remote controls and wall clocks) they are just hard to beat as max balls out total capacity is just not a criteria I look for....I also have never had and ENELOOP cell leak in a device ,except for a charger that ran amuck and cooked 4 of my gen 3 cells.

Good to see a bit more life here ,your data may also help someone looking for cutting edge performance...I also need to take another EBL look for AA and AAA

Offline Ralph

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Re: Don's Rechargeable Battery Guide
« Reply #8 on: August 20, 2018, 11:07:11 AM »
Good points!  Somehow I missed the 500mA rate on Eneloops.  Some time back I ran a couple CBA tests comparing Eneloop AAs with fresh Duracell alkaline AAs. At about 500mA discharge the two were about equal.  Above 500mA the Eneloops won out, blowing the proverbial doors off Duracells at higher rates of discharge.  At lower rates the Duracells won.  Ohm's Law at work!

I use the 2A test to see how batteries will last in my light which pulls about that much on high- a worse case test.  I normally run my cells through a test about once per year just to see if there is any one failing- none yet even with Gen 1s. Eneloops are pretty impressive.  Agreed that a few extra minutes run time really does not matter much, I always have extra charged cells close at hand.  It may take me a while to get to it, but I'll try retesting at 500mA.  If internal resistances are low enough there shouldn't be much difference. 

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Re: Don's Rechargeable Battery Guide
« Reply #9 on: August 20, 2018, 03:34:12 PM »
  The best part is that within 4 re-charge cycles ....the rechargeable cells win for ECONOMY also ....no more batteries in the trash from my use...I own ,and cycle thru about 120 AA Eneloop and other cells and find them consistent in the Low Self Discharge type of use as not all of my stuff requires max power ...so having toys that work when I need them is more important.

Offline Ralph

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Re: Don's Rechargeable Battery Guide
« Reply #10 on: August 21, 2018, 08:09:03 AM »
I know what you mean.  When I ran tests on the alkalines it felt strange to toss them in the trash after one use.  It's odd how people are always charging phones without a second thought but dont use rechargeable batteries anywhere else. 

I took my EBLs, CBA, and laptop to work.  I ran the last test overnight.  I'll post the graphs after I do the same on Eneloops.  The overview is none came close to the rated 2800mAH.  I tested at 0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2 amps.  All came up to or slightly exceeded 2AH.  Not bad for heavy loads.  Under 0.5A will take too long to test so I probably wont do that.  Ill probably run a similar test on AAAs- I am curious and others may be as well.

I also have EBL 18650s which now have a few cycles on them, and some 10,000mAH EBL D cells on their way.  I really need to stop buying batteries!  At some point it would be interesting to charge some Eneloops and EBLs then let them sit to see how their LSDs compare.  So many batteries, so little time.  Now I need to look for a battery organizer to hold all the sizes in a FIFO setup.  If anyone knows of a good one let me know. 

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Re: Don's Rechargeable Battery Guide
« Reply #11 on: August 21, 2018, 10:55:16 AM »
  I get great service,for the last few years,from my TENERGY  "D" cell Low Self Discharge  8000 Mah cells...they make also 10,000 but I budget for the 8,000 size and run my radio every night (to cover bumps in the night) so dog and I get full nights sleep...the radio ,a SONY 3 "D" cell AM/FM runs about a month and I swap out for a set of charged cells and put the tired ones in the budget charger for a couple days to bring them back to life.

Offline Greekman

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Re: Don's Rechargeable Battery Guide
« Reply #12 on: August 21, 2018, 11:46:32 AM »
Should you add the IKEA AA & AAA bats? Word on the street is that they are rebranded Eneloops. And even if the are not, tests show them really close.

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Re: Don's Rechargeable Battery Guide
« Reply #13 on: August 21, 2018, 05:30:30 PM »
Should you add the IKEA AA & AAA bats? Word on the street is that they are rebranded Eneloops. And even if the are not, tests show them really close.

They are OK at nearly the same cost as ENELOOP cells though their Low Self Discharge is NOT in the same class as Eneloop cells.

Offline Ralph

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Re: Don's Rechargeable Battery Guide
« Reply #14 on: August 21, 2018, 08:07:37 PM »
I've read good things about Tenergy, but at the time I ordered EBL was on my mind.  I expect maybe 8000 out of the rated 10000mAH D cells. What did cross my mind was how long it was going to take charging them up.  My Xtar charger is only 1 amp max.

I would have had the EBL vs Eneloop graphs done except it seems in the shuffle I missed topping off one cell so I have to run that cell again.  None of the Eneloops hit 2AH, even at 500mA drain.  All but 1 Eneloop were gen 3s picked randomly from my waiting  to be used cells, the other a gen 2.  In spite of a slight edge in capacity, the big question with EBL is how they will hold up over time and use.  My gen1 Eneloops are still doing well.

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Re: Don's Rechargeable Battery Guide
« Reply #15 on: August 22, 2018, 04:37:13 AM »
  Yea, it's kind of hard to switch away to try others after such good history with ENELOOPS since Gen 1's here also.

Offline Ralph

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Re: Don's Rechargeable Battery Guide
« Reply #16 on: August 22, 2018, 10:55:51 AM »
I finished the CBA runs, but apparently now I have to learn how to get an image into my post! 

I got to thinking about the 500mA discharges. Reducing the discharge rate further probably won't increase the capacity by much, so where do manufacturers get these unrealistic capacity ratings?  Then I remembered when I was looking at lead acid batteries some time ago.  One manufacturer had what seemed to be a high capacity for it's case size.  They actually had all kinds of specs and graphs available online.  What I eventually noticed was that they used a lower cutoff voltage for capacity testing than other manufacturers.  So, while their ratings were accurate by their own tests, their tests were not equivalent or comparable with other manufacturers.

Has anyone been using the new high capacity Eneloops?

Offline Mr. Bill

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Re: Don's Rechargeable Battery Guide
« Reply #17 on: August 22, 2018, 11:17:42 AM »
I finished the CBA runs, but apparently now I have to learn how to get an image into my post!

You'll have to upload the image somewhere from which it can be hotlinked.  Then click the Insert Image button, and paste the URL of the image between the tags.

Example:
Code: [Select]
Archer's secret identity revealed: [img]http://statler.ws/GreenArrow.jpg[/img]
Result:
Quote
Archer's secret identity revealed:

Online Carl

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Re: Don's Rechargeable Battery Guide
« Reply #18 on: August 23, 2018, 06:39:40 AM »
I finished the CBA runs, but apparently now I have to learn how to get an image into my post! 

I got to thinking about the 500mA discharges. Reducing the discharge rate further probably won't increase the capacity by much, so where do manufacturers get these unrealistic capacity ratings?  Then I remembered when I was looking at lead acid batteries some time ago.  One manufacturer had what seemed to be a high capacity for it's case size.  They actually had all kinds of specs and graphs available online.  What I eventually noticed was that they used a lower cutoff voltage for capacity testing than other manufacturers.  So, while their ratings were accurate by their own tests, their tests were not equivalent or comparable with other manufacturers.

Has anyone been using the new high capacity Eneloops?

  In 'real world' test you will find that ,for now, 2,000 Mah is about the pinnacle for AA cells and the higher capacity rated cells do not consistently outlast the 2,000 Mah cells ...I have tested them in flashlights,CBA,and camera flash units and find the 2550 and 2800 rated cells do not produce as much worthwhile power as the 'normal' 2,000 Mah 3rd or 4th generation Eneloop

of interest : https://thewirecutter.com/reviews/best-rechargeable-batteries/

and: https://metaefficient.com/rechargeable-batteries/best-rechargeable-batteries-battery-chargers.html

Offline Ralph

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Re: Don's Rechargeable Battery Guide
« Reply #19 on: August 24, 2018, 10:52:59 AM »
Thanks for the image posting info.  I found there's also a help section here on TSPC with a couple links to upload images to.  I'll check it out when I have a little more time to play.  Since my last visit I ran my 8 new EBL 1100mAH AAAs thru the CBA, testing at a rather high 500mA.  Like EBL's AAs the tested capacity didnt come close to their ratings.  They ranged from 850-900mAH- another graph I'll have to post.  Once again EBL had a slight edge on Eneloops.  My D cells should be showing up today, so after a couple cycles I'll test those.  I pulled out my LaCross 4 bank charger for the AAAs.  My Xtar is only 2 cells.  I haven't used the LaCross for quite a while since I've been using mostly Li ions.  I forgot how nice the LaCross charger is. 

I've never tried this on small batteries, but I use it as one guide with car batteries.  I look at the weight of the battery.  My reasoning  is more power means more lead and more weight.  I know that makes a lot of assumptions, but it seems to hold true.  I have found even knockoff Duracell AAs are light compared to the real ones.  I'll have to weigh a sampling of batteries out of curiosity- one more thing for the battery to do list.  My D cells just showed up on the doorstep! 

I did notice that EBL has more than one capacity battery in a few of their sizes.  I bought the higher capacity ones but wonder if there is actually any difference between them.  Maybe they are the same in reality?  I am not going to buy more batteries to test that theory, but maybe someone already has some they can test.

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Re: Don's Rechargeable Battery Guide
« Reply #20 on: August 24, 2018, 08:26:00 PM »
Ralph  I use Google and you get a storage area (FREE) called Google Drive that can store and organize some images and you can then link to each image ,or the directory with many images,so people can take a look...there are likely easier ways ,but that is what I do for now.

Offline Ralph

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Re: Don's Rechargeable Battery Guide
« Reply #21 on: August 25, 2018, 10:49:50 AM »
Thanks for the Google idea, will check it out when I have some time.  BTW, any ideas for a good charger that can handle NM, Li cells all sizes including D cells? As expected the D cells dont fit in my xtar. I managed to get one cell working with a rubber band to keep it in and a quarter so the + terminal connects.  My i2 which I keep at work worked with a rubber band and didnt need the quarter.  Neither is acceptable, and with the D cells more than 1 amp would be nice.

Offline Greekman

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Re: Don's Rechargeable Battery Guide
« Reply #22 on: August 25, 2018, 11:03:17 AM »
I did notice that EBL has more than one capacity battery in a few of their sizes.  I bought the higher capacity ones but wonder if there is actually any difference between them.  Maybe they are the same in reality?  I am not going to buy more batteries to test that theory, but maybe someone already has some they can test.

well, the EBL and such, are all rebranded batteries with quality cells inside. There are 4 big makers. Panasonic, Sanyop, LG and Samsung. Once yuo fidn soemone on the net that has unwrapped his, all the mystery is solved.

Then the other factor regarding battery quality is the protection circuit inside. Usually these rebranded cells use a Casio circuit which is just fine.

There is an on;in store that cells in bulk to have a look at what is in themarket at the moment. I mean the original cells. And has some very informative articles on lithium batteries.enoy... https://batterybro.com/collections/18650-battery

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Re: Don's Rechargeable Battery Guide
« Reply #23 on: August 25, 2018, 12:01:22 PM »
I just use a low cost 4 hole charger for the "D" cells as it can run from my 12 volt ,solar charged,system and charges at about 1 Amp per "D" cell

https://www.amazon.com/EBL-Rechargeable-Batteries-Discharge-Function/dp/B073ZD7XVV/ref=sr_1_8?ie=UTF8&qid=1535219236&sr=8-8&keywords=d+cell+charger

But if current and all battery capability are a requirement,you might find this fits the need...I havn't used it yet as it is my 'back-up'

https://www.amazon.com/AccuPower-Charger-IQ338XL-Li-Ion-18650/dp/B01DZCSVD2/ref=sr_1_9?ie=UTF8&qid=1535219236&sr=8-9&keywords=d+cell+charger

Note that it also can use a 12 volt input,but may need regulation as I have yet to test it.

Offline Ralph

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Re: Don's Rechargeable Battery Guide
« Reply #24 on: August 30, 2018, 03:18:36 PM »
Thank you for the suggestions.  I uploaded 2 CBA outputs to Google, and if all works well they should follow.  I also ordered the Accupower charger which should show up on 8/31.  With charger in hand I will put the EBL 'D's through a couple cycles and give them a test on the CBA.








Offline Ralph

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Re: Don's Rechargeable Battery Guide
« Reply #25 on: August 30, 2018, 03:40:38 PM »
I don't know if these will work, if the images don't appear I'll have to check what I am doing wrong.






https://photos.app.goo.gl/DuqKM9wQoAGpfvBV8


EDIT BY MR. BILL: Fixed the images (I think)
« Last Edit: August 31, 2018, 11:03:39 AM by Mr. Bill »

Offline Ralph

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Re: Don's Rechargeable Battery Guide
« Reply #26 on: September 02, 2018, 10:28:45 AM »
Last I looked at my previous entry there was a link with no images.  If anyone fixed the images please let me know what I did wrong.

I got to play with the new Accupower.  Immediately it looked quite similar to a Lacross.  It fits 4 D cells at once so it's not too small.  Function/ feature wise it's again similar to my Lacross with the addition of Li ion capability, charge current up to 1.5A, and a battery internal resistance readout.  After using my 2 cell Xtar for so long it was nice to be able to charge 4 cells at once.  There's a 1A USB charging port and 2 9v NIMH only charge connectors.  It's a nice charger.

My 4 EBL D cells are in the Accupower as I type.  It is their 1st power cycle.  The Accupower has a fixed 500mA discharge on tests, and I set the charge rate to 1A.  The test is in progress about 10 hours so far with about 7 left to completion.  D cells hold a lot of energy. 

Is there a thread on here for battery chargers?