Author Topic: “I’m going to work until I die”  (Read 6381 times)

Offline NWPilgrim

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Re: “I’m going to work until I die”
« Reply #60 on: November 27, 2017, 07:47:39 PM »
Yeah, I remember being young and seeing "layaway" commercials. I guess that used to be common. They still offer weird no money down, no payments offers on furniture.

I doubt there's a human alive who would fault you for buying a computer to finish school, especially 30 years ago when grad school meant something.

I kinda feel that's the theme here. We all get financing a truck to start a landscaping business. Or taking a loan to expand a factory. But those have returns. Living in debt with no savings and struggling to pay the minimum monthly is a different animal. There's a guy out there right now who has a 10 year loan on his Escalade and is excited to finance his new iPhone. And he will work until he drops dead.

I think that is a key point, David!  Loans or any debt should be very short term and easily within current monthly budget discretionary limits, or "investing" in something with a sure return (vehicle to commute to new/better job or business, tools for job/biz, education with direct path to better career, etc.).  Personally I prefer to just avoid short term consumer debt entirely and pass up the occasional great buy on a credit card to pay off in 1-3 months.  But for a job or biz then I think it makes sense to take on some manageable debt as long as it DIRECTLY improves your earning ability.  But education loans have gotten stupid these days with $50K-$100K loans for degrees with no hope to ever lead to a career that could pay them off in 20 years let alone 3-5 yrs.

Offline David in MN

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Re: “I’m going to work until I die”
« Reply #61 on: May 16, 2018, 05:24:04 PM »
Marketwatch put up an article claiming you should have double your salary saved by the time you are 35. People reacted negatively.

http://www.businessinsider.com/how-much-money-saved-by-age-35-experts-2018-5

That's not that much money. If we had saved twice our income at 35 there would have been a discussion at the mound and a little rough language.

Not that I'm not sympathetic with 30 year olds who spent 6 years in college accumulating debt and studying Latvian poetry because they were lied to by just about everyone in society. But holy crap do we have a savings disaster.

Offline LvsChant

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Re: “I’m going to work until I die”
« Reply #62 on: May 16, 2018, 09:02:27 PM »
With the kind of student loan debt so many of them accumulate, I'd guess they would see that type of saving as an impossible dream... we are working hard to make sure our kids don't have any debt when they graduate... it is something we really want to do for them.

Online Smurf Hunter

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Re: “I’m going to work until I die”
« Reply #63 on: May 17, 2018, 08:28:19 AM »
Marketwatch put up an article claiming you should have double your salary saved by the time you are 35. People reacted negatively.

http://www.businessinsider.com/how-much-money-saved-by-age-35-experts-2018-5

That's not that much money. If we had saved twice our income at 35 there would have been a discussion at the mound and a little rough language.

Not that I'm not sympathetic with 30 year olds who spent 6 years in college accumulating debt and studying Latvian poetry because they were lied to by just about everyone in society. But holy crap do we have a savings disaster.

My name is Smurf Hunter and I have a problem.
I turn 42 next month and in my 401k+IRA I have about 1.75 times my gross salary saved.
I withhold 11% from each paycheck, and my employer matches another 3%.  So 14% of my gross income is withheld.

I saved aggressively before I had kids, then my wife stopped working and at the time we lost 40% of our household income, so foolishly I pulled back from the contributions in those years.  For the past decade I've been better, started with 5% and increased 1% annually to where I am now.

Though I've always thought when I retire my lifestyle would be considerably less expensive. There are SO many child related expenses that will go away after retirement. I wouldn't have to deal with commuting, buying overpriced convenience meals while working late, etc.  Not to mention the hope of downsizing and relocating to a less expensive zipcode, or possibly even relocation to fly over country.  I could replace a $600K west coast home with a $300K home with more property in much of the US.

The odd thing is, I'm a rockstar saver compared to my peers.  There are a lot of engineers on my team in their mid twenties, and few do any retirement savings, not even to the point of the free 3% company match.  I have gently, but firmly explained that's literally free money, but it has not clicked for them.

Offline Zef_66

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Re: “I’m going to work until I die”
« Reply #64 on: May 17, 2018, 10:32:48 AM »
My name is Smurf Hunter and I have a problem.
I turn 42 next month and in my 401k+IRA I have about 1.75 times my gross salary saved.
I withhold 11% from each paycheck, and my employer matches another 3%.  So 14% of my gross income is withheld.

I saved aggressively before I had kids, then my wife stopped working and at the time we lost 40% of our household income, so foolishly I pulled back from the contributions in those years.  For the past decade I've been better, started with 5% and increased 1% annually to where I am now.

Though I've always thought when I retire my lifestyle would be considerably less expensive. There are SO many child related expenses that will go away after retirement. I wouldn't have to deal with commuting, buying overpriced convenience meals while working late, etc.  Not to mention the hope of downsizing and relocating to a less expensive zipcode, or possibly even relocation to fly over country.  I could replace a $600K west coast home with a $300K home with more property in much of the US.

The odd thing is, I'm a rockstar saver compared to my peers.  There are a lot of engineers on my team in their mid twenties, and few do any retirement savings, not even to the point of the free 3% company match.  I have gently, but firmly explained that's literally free money, but it has not clicked for them.
Thanks for the honest post, Smurf.

I'm in an odd spot, I think. I'm 36. Just my own personal IRA & 401K, I have about 2/3 of my gross salary saved. But my company is employee owned, so the company pays our retirement money into an ESOP. Basically, we get shares of our company and an independent company sets a yearly stock price for those shares. So my ESOP is currently 1.65 times my gross. All total, I'm around 2.3 times my gross.
Doesn't look bad on the surface. But I'm always worried. The majority of my retirement is in one company. Yes, we are doing well and growing each year. But with 25-30 years before I retire, I'm worried that trend will continue. If 10 years from now, when I have $250k in my ESOP, and the company hits some hard times, do I ride it out, or jump ship and take what I have with me? If the company goes down the tubes, everything is gone. I only have what I've saved myself in my Roth and unmatched 401K.

Just the chance I have to take I guess. If all goes well and we keep going as we have been for the past 10 years, I could retire at 60 with $1.5mil. It is such a gamble to be all in on one company. Not to mention that my wife is now a stay at home mom. So it's just me that we are relying on for the future. I'm currently saving about 7% of my salary and trying to up that a little each year. But it's tough with 3 kids and only one income.

Offline FreeLancer

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Re: “I’m going to work until I die”
« Reply #65 on: May 17, 2018, 04:01:20 PM »
I saw this table recently that suggests savings targets should be adjusted up as household income increases. 


Offline David in MN

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Re: “I’m going to work until I die”
« Reply #66 on: May 17, 2018, 05:15:46 PM »
I don't cling to any metrics as gold, Reasonable people can disagree on the correct metric and I've experienced shifting our savings plans due to life events. We were lucky to achieve a ~20% savings early on though it delayed buying a house until we were 26... in 2006. So it's a double edged sword. Put money here or there? We could have saved a lot less and bought earlier and not been hit so bad in the recession but we ran the math on compounding interest and decidded to build the savings rather than go all in to a house.

I more focus on the people who call good savings unrealistic. It's a good debate whether to fund the 401 or pay off the mortgage. We did that game for a while in order to refinance and generate more savings. The math is difficult and you could be making a bad decision for all the right reasons. And you still have the ability to lose the timing game.

The odd thing is, I'm a rockstar saver compared to my peers.  There are a lot of engineers on my team in their mid twenties, and few do any retirement savings, not even to the point of the free 3% company match.  I have gently, but firmly explained that's literally free money, but it has not clicked for them.

That's what is crazy to me. My company matched up to 5% (I think). So I used to coach new employees to put 5% in the 401, 10% in the IRA and voila you have a 20% savings for 15% cost. The next step was to survive 5 years and vest in the pension. I watched guys not use the 401 match and jump gigs 4 years in. Just plain crazy.

Online Smurf Hunter

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Re: “I’m going to work until I die”
« Reply #67 on: May 18, 2018, 09:55:58 AM »
My place vests in just 2 years.  Extra stupid not to opt into that.