Author Topic: One more Survival Bike  (Read 634 times)

Offline Greekman

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One more Survival Bike
« on: November 13, 2017, 10:13:21 AM »
well actually a Motoped.
it kinda makes sens to have a lighter bike, but i can think that there might be durability issues?

https://motoped.com/survival/

Offline KellyAnn

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Re: One more Survival Bike
« Reply #1 on: November 13, 2017, 11:52:10 AM »
Looks kind of cool, but that would get stolen pretty quickly where I live, unless you got a seriously strong chain to lock it up with.

Offline Greekman

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Re: One more Survival Bike
« Reply #2 on: November 13, 2017, 01:12:09 PM »
I do have my doubts. the 50cc engine is rather small for this frame and load.
Also, assuming one pedals, how hard will it be to? I imagine there will be big losses on the gears etc.

On the other hand we had excellent experience with the likes of the Honda Super Cubs here in Greece in dirt and gravel roads. Which is not that far off.
http://world.honda.com/Cub/

Offline KellyAnn

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Re: One more Survival Bike
« Reply #3 on: November 13, 2017, 02:42:39 PM »
I totally missed that it was a pedal powered bike as well.
I'm a big fan of electric battery powered bicycles and of cargo bicycles.  The big question with those is how difficult it is to use only the pedal power if the battery dies.  I can't imagine trying to pedal something with a gasoline engine in it.  Not to mention that it wouldn't be allowed on the street where I live, not in the bicycle lane, and not on the sidwalk/pavement.

It has a 30 pound (13.5 kg) max load limit on the rear rack, that's almost nothing, my four year old weighs more than that.  My bicycle can carry 200 lbs, (I've never hauled much more than about 50 kg (110 lbs) on it though.)

Also...this motoped weighs 135 lbs.  That's crazy heavy.
My bicycle weighs 35 lbs.  I can lift it with one hand if I have to.
If I had an electric battery and powered wheel on it, it would weigh about 60 lbs.  Still less than half of that motobike.

That motobike "looks" neat, but I can't imagine actually riding it into battle (or to the grocery store).
For me, I want something that works well, not just something that looks cool.

Offline Alan Georges

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Re: One more Survival Bike
« Reply #4 on: November 13, 2017, 04:51:53 PM »
135 pounds and $3200US (and that's the no engine version), there's something seriously wrong with this idea.

Artes sunt magis quam instrumenta.

Offline KellyAnn

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Re: One more Survival Bike
« Reply #5 on: November 13, 2017, 05:09:54 PM »
135 pounds and $3200US (and that's the no engine version), there's something seriously wrong with this idea.

It's all cupholder.
Wait...does it have cupholders?

Offline Alan Georges

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Re: One more Survival Bike
« Reply #6 on: November 13, 2017, 05:35:50 PM »
Wait...does it have cupholders?
For that price, it'd better!  And maybe a built-in espresso maker too.

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Offline Greekman

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Re: One more Survival Bike
« Reply #7 on: November 14, 2017, 01:03:59 AM »
guys and gals, are yuo seeing this from the bicycle perspective or from the motorbike one?
As a light motorbike it could have merit, sans the pedals I think

Offline Alan Georges

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Re: One more Survival Bike
« Reply #8 on: November 14, 2017, 06:15:03 AM »
Yes, that is a fair point you make Greekman.  If I was looking for a survival-orented motorcycle, I'd probably look at dual-sport bikes (for some examples look at https://www.digitaltrends.com/cars/best-dual-sport-motorcycles/).  At half the weight and for $1400+ less though, the bike you posted begins to make sense.

At the other end of things a good used mountain bike (< $500) and a gas engine kit (< $200, http://www.bikeberry.com/gas-engine-kits/gas-engine-kits.html) would be a lot lighter and less expensive.

Anyway, the bike you posted is an interesting option GM.

Artes sunt magis quam instrumenta.

Offline KellyAnn

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Re: One more Survival Bike
« Reply #9 on: November 14, 2017, 10:05:04 AM »
I'm looking at it from the viewpoint of cost/benefit.
It's costs a lot and it doesn't seem terribly capable of hauling a lot of gear (30 lbs is nothing).
I don't much about motorbikes, so I'm comparing it to what I DO know, which is cargo bikes.


If I had $3200 to buy two wheeled transportation, I'd not be buying that motorbike.

Offline kid_couteau

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Re: One more Survival Bike
« Reply #10 on: November 14, 2017, 01:42:46 PM »
I like the concept but I think a Rokon would be better for my needs

https://www.rokon.com/

Offline machinisttx

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Re: One more Survival Bike
« Reply #11 on: November 14, 2017, 05:28:51 PM »
guys and gals, are yuo seeing this from the bicycle perspective or from the motorbike one?
As a light motorbike it could have merit, sans the pedals I think

I can't really find much merit either way. It costs as much as a Honda Grom(125cc). I've seen some fairly large guys riding Groms, so I suspect that they can carry a load a bit better. The Honda Ruckus(49cc, scooterish) costs about $1000 less. Another $1000 would buy a Honda CRF250L dual sport. I didn't bother looking up Kawasaki or Yamaha, but I'm sure their pricing is in the same ballpark. Regardless, it's ludicrously priced for what it is.

The only advantage I see with this thing over a $200 engine kit and a standard bike is that it has actual offroad motorcycle rims and tires. I take that back, there is one other advantage...most of those kit engines are not designed for continuous running.
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Offline FreeThinker

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Re: One more Survival Bike
« Reply #12 on: November 15, 2017, 07:32:53 AM »
Just in general I like the idea of bringing a second motorized "BOV2" when bugging out in the primary "BOV1" (car, truck, or SUV).  All the better if BOV2 is a 2-wheeled moped/dirt bike/dual sport such as this that can be carried in, or on, BOV1 without requiring a trailer which could limit the mobility for BOV1.  Never owned or knew anyone that owned one of these Motopeds so no opinion on it specifically, I have a DRZ 400 for use as BOV2 but won't claim it's the best for every situation, just that it has been reliable and fits our needs well.  YMMV.

The goal is to arrive at the BOL with everything you left home with obviously, and BOV2 could then be put to use for fuel-efficient transportation, scouting, or to help haul wood or game.  For the mechanically handy, it could also be secured in place and the rear tire removed, then the drive chain used to power things like pumps, saws, or an alternator (at least until your fuel supplies were exhausted).

But in the worst case, stuck between home and the BOL by traffic, roadblocks, vehicle breakdown, or any number of other problems that leave you stranded mid-way, then abandon BOV1 and finish the journey with BOV2.  This would allow you to quickly put distance between yourself and the refugees forced to travel by foot or other non-motorized means.  Depending on the scenario, large numbers of refugees might not be welcome to cross every county line or city limit, especially those without their own transportation that might be seen as more likely to take temporary refuge there and be a further drain on already limited resources in that county, city, or town.  That motorcycles/mopeds offer the most mobility, being able to fit through narrow openings or even lifted over obstacles, combined with their off-road capability makes them the perfect BOV2 choice IMO.