Author Topic: Chemsoldier's Pistol Training Log  (Read 1458 times)

Offline Chemsoldier

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Chemsoldier's Pistol Training Log
« on: December 30, 2017, 08:58:56 AM »
So, I am a pretty fair shot with a pistol.  However, I really like firearms.  My knowledge level about the industry and other academic knowledge is higher than my skill level.  My knowledge of the training industry and desire to take a wide variety of courses is high.  However to take those courses would be a bit of an affectation, I could get better than I am now through solo practice.  I am interested in pistol customization and optimization, however I do not yet have the skill to wring the max capability from my mostly stock pistols.

In 2018 that changes!  I have started using Claude Werner's (https://tacticalprofessor.wordpress.com/) Pistol Practice Program, which is a collection of 50 round range sessions to build pistol skills.  I have also started dry firing every day, short sessions of maybe 25-50 trigger presses. I am trying to get to the range at least weekly.  With the 50 round routines I can get in and out in 30-45 minutes so hopefully that will keep me going.  Already I have exercises with the military on the horizon that will interrupt it, but everything has to start somewhere.

I am going to use this as a way to keep track of it all.  I got the idea from Pistol-forum.com who has an entire section of people's training logs for pistol training.

Goals:
-Consistently shoot the pistol with both eyes open (yeah, one of my oldest bad pistol habits)
Shoot Expert in IDPA
-Complete Claude Werner's PPP Baseline test clean with all 10/Xs
-Complete the FAST (Fundamentals of Accuracy and Speed Test) under 7 seconds 2 out of 3 runs
-Shoot Expert in Stock Service Pistol (SSP) on the IDPA classifier (currently unclassified, though I suspect I will be on the lower end of Sharpshooter, the tier below Expert)
-Dry fire daily

So we will see how this will go.  I am the world's worst diarist. 

Offline ID_Joker

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Re: Chemsoldier's Pistol Training Log
« Reply #1 on: December 31, 2017, 01:33:01 PM »
Sounds like a good plan!  I have started doing some work in the same vein, but unfortunately, not so structured.  I probably need to steal some of your ideas.  I've been pretty good about getting dry fire in 5-6 times per week, but not as good about getting to the range and not as good about structuring my range sessions for maximum training benefit.

Offline Chemsoldier

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Re: Chemsoldier's Pistol Training Log
« Reply #2 on: January 02, 2018, 05:40:18 PM »
So the next few posts might be a mix of “What did I do today” and some background information.

The Gun



For the last three years I have been carrying one or another Generation 3 Glock Model 19 (midsized, 15 round capacity).  I have had a few minor modifications that have now become standard for me and my guns.

-Ameriglo CAP sights.  Instead of a ball of glowy stuff on the front sight blade as with most night sights, the whole front sight blade is filled with glowy stuff. Unlike the standard sights, these allow me to see a little bit of daylight inside the rear sight notch on each side of the front sight blade.  I like that.  The notch is plain black instead of the standard white U-Shaped outline on the rear sight.

Standard Glock Sights:


CAPs:




-I added the Vicker’s Tango Down magazine release.  It is nothing special, its just a mag release that is a little higher profile than the stock one, and a little lower profile than the factory extended mag release.  Having run through all three release types, this one seems best for getting a good stab with my firing thumb and not snagging on anything.  This modification is awesome in the Gen 1-3, it is not needed in the Gen 4-5 guns since they redesigned the mag release.

-The Vicker’s magazine release.  It’s a little easier to get a thumb on than the stock one, but not as likely to be inadvertently activated by a high hand grip as the factory competition mag release.
The last two are such hard to see changes that I will not bother with pics.  You will feel the difference if you use them, it doesn't look like much otherwise.

Holster: I carry in a Galco Summer Special style holster. It is a leather, inside the waistband holster that rides on my right hip at about the 3:30 to 4 o’clock position.   



Today:
Basic Dry Fire Routine:
5 trigger presses at a spot target (fine aiming point)
5 trigger presses, presentation from low ready to a silhouette target
5 trigger presses, presentation from high compressed ready to a silhouette target
5 trigger presses, presentation from the holster to a silhouette target
5 trigger presses at a spot target (fine aiming point)

This is my basic routine that I try to do no less than three times a week and is my lowest common denominator.  If I have had the day from hell, everything has fallen apart, this is my minimum.  The focus is on doing it right, not speed.  Focusing hard on the front sight, utilizing follow through and "calling my shot" to ensure I know if the sights moved right before the trigger snapped.

I know, nothing fancy.  Most folks have heard of the 10,000 reps or 10,000 hours of dedicated practice to really master something.  That is likely true, but with the large suite of skills needed in life, there is also evidence that how recently you have executed a skill helps with performance as well.  As Tom Givens of Rangemaster is reported to have said, "When you last practiced is more important than how much you last practiced."

So that is the method I am trying to work on this year.  Instead of having weeks or months between range sessions and no dry fire, I want to keep myself no more than 24 hours from my last properly performed trigger press.

Offline Chemsoldier

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Re: Chemsoldier's Pistol Training Log
« Reply #3 on: January 02, 2018, 06:23:35 PM »

I know, nothing fancy.  Most folks have heard of the 10,000 reps or 10,000 hours of dedicated practice to really master something.  That is likely true, but with the large suite of skills needed in life, there is also evidence that how recently you have executed a skill helps with performance as well.  As Tom Givens of Rangemaster is reported to have said, "When you last practiced is more important than how much you last practiced."

So that is the method I am trying to work on this year.  Instead of having weeks or months between range sessions and no dry fire, I want to keep myself no more than 24 hours from my last properly performed trigger press.
Its also worth pointing out that if you do 25 trigger presses a day for a few years, you will hit those 10,000 reps.

Offline Ms. Albatross

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Re: Chemsoldier's Pistol Training Log
« Reply #4 on: January 02, 2018, 06:49:09 PM »
  I have started using Claude Werner's (https://tacticalprofessor.wordpress.com/) Pistol Practice Program,

Sadly, it doesn't seem to be available for sale anymore.

Offline Chemsoldier

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Re: Chemsoldier's Pistol Training Log
« Reply #5 on: January 02, 2018, 07:41:24 PM »
Sadly, it doesn't seem to be available for sale anymore.
https://tacticalprofessor.wordpress.com/2016/07/30/indoor-range-practice-sessions/

This what replaced the PPP. I can't vouch for it, but it's what Claude is selling now. It should be a lot better than not doing it.
 

Offline CarbideAndIron

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Re: Chemsoldier's Pistol Training Log
« Reply #6 on: January 03, 2018, 07:02:39 AM »
This is a great idea to log this. I'll be following along. I have definitely slacked off training my skills consistently.

Offline Sailor

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Re: Chemsoldier's Pistol Training Log
« Reply #7 on: January 03, 2018, 09:26:18 AM »
Putting extra time into this myself, mostly because of my 52 year old eyes, I can not focus well on that front sight and moved to an RMR optic.  That is taking some getting used to. 

What always throws me off in training is mixing in medical and comms.  It all goes great until there is a simulated injury and or frantic bystanders, working around that  and getting your hits is always challenging.  Not something you are going be able to a square range though.

Offline Ms. Albatross

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Re: Chemsoldier's Pistol Training Log
« Reply #8 on: January 03, 2018, 11:34:16 AM »
https://tacticalprofessor.wordpress.com/2016/07/30/indoor-range-practice-sessions/

This what replaced the PPP. I can't vouch for it, but it's what Claude is selling now. It should be a lot better than not doing it.

Thank you!

Offline Chemsoldier

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Re: Chemsoldier's Pistol Training Log
« Reply #9 on: January 03, 2018, 07:06:42 PM »
3 JAN 2017:
One Hand Routine:
5 trigger presses at a spot target Strong Hand Only (SHO) (you start pointed at the target)
5 trigger presses, presentation from low ready to a silhouette target, SHO
5 trigger presses, presentation from high compressed ready to a silhouette target, SHO
5 trigger presses, presentation from the holster to a silhouette target, SHO
5 trigger presses at a spot target (fine aiming point), Weak Hand Only
5 trigger presses, presentation from low ready to a silhouette target, SHO
5 trigger presses at a spot target Strong Hand Only (SHO)

Try to remember to follow through, stay oriented on the target after the trigger breaks for a moment.  I have to fight the urge to rapidly cycle the slide to reset the striker after the trigger snaps.  It is also sometimes tempting to rapidly reholster, don't do it.  Its a bad habit, speed reholstering is responsible for a lot of negligent discharges. I am keeping the number of trigger presses pretty low. Make each one its own little event.

I notice a lot more movement of the front site in one handed fire than two handed.

Offline Chemsoldier

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Re: Chemsoldier's Pistol Training Log
« Reply #10 on: January 06, 2018, 12:48:59 PM »
To be continued: I am in the field for a few weeks.

Offline scoob

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Re: Chemsoldier's Pistol Training Log
« Reply #11 on: January 06, 2018, 03:11:57 PM »
A friend of mine (a CDP, SSP, ESP master class shooter in IDPA) recommended Steve Anderson's Refinement and Repetition.
http://www.andersonshooting.com/products/refinement-and-repetition/
I picked it up and it looks like a good tool,  but I haven't gotten started on it yet.  It has some decent drills and it's set up in a log book format.

My wife and I used to shoot IDPA, but it's just too far to drive since we moved out of town.    We have plenty of places to shoot within a couple miles of the house now though, so we'll just set up our own stages and have some fun practicing, and maybe get a couple of neighbors on board.

Offline Chemsoldier

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Re: Chemsoldier's Pistol Training Log
« Reply #12 on: January 20, 2018, 06:51:39 PM »
Allright! Back from the field and the freezer burn has worn off.

20 January 2018:
Basic dryfire practice session-25 trigger presses as indicated above

Offline Chemsoldier

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Re: Chemsoldier's Pistol Training Log
« Reply #13 on: January 22, 2018, 05:38:40 PM »
22 Jan:
AM: Basic dryfire routine
PM: Timed dryfire routine- the same routine but with a recorded par time for every repetition

Offline Chemsoldier

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Re: Chemsoldier's Pistol Training Log
« Reply #14 on: January 23, 2018, 08:24:52 PM »
23 Jan:
10 draw and dry fire at a single target
10 slide lock reloads. From dead trigger with the slide locked back to dry fire on a single target following the reload

Offline Chemsoldier

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Re: Chemsoldier's Pistol Training Log
« Reply #15 on: January 24, 2018, 05:59:52 PM »
24 JAN 18:
Wall Drill today.  The Wall Drill is simply a dry fire drill where you aim at a blank wall an inch or so in front of the muzzle.  It is important to not use any aiming spot or have anything in front of the muzzle that will draw your attention.  The point of the exercise is to focus hard on your front site and to practice perfect sight alignment and trigger press.  Do not let your alignment change as the trigger breaks.

More on the practice:
http://pistol-training.com/archives/118

Today I did 20 using two handed fire, 10 strong hand only, 10 Weak Hand Only and finally did 10 more SHO since I noticed that my WHO was actually better aligned than Strong Handed.

Offline rodgers65

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Re: Chemsoldier's Pistol Training Log
« Reply #16 on: January 25, 2018, 12:58:22 PM »
I struggled for years doing a similar program to yours and never saw much improvement.  (Maxed out at low ESP/SSP Expert for longer than I'd care to admit) 

Then I got on to Steve Anderson's Refinement and Repetition.  He has a pretty good podcast too, That Shooting Show.  If you listen, you'll hear him preach about his 12 drills.  They're the first 12 drills out of Refinement and Repetition.  Do each one for x-number of minutes a night and you'll see results, blah, blah, blah. 

So I tried it for a month, just two mintues/drill (about 35 minutes/night total).  At my next match, I won top overall (80+ people).

Buy the book and listen to his podcast to hear how it should be applied (he's a bit of an oddball, fair warning).  You'll save yourself years of aggravation. 

Offline Chemsoldier

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Re: Chemsoldier's Pistol Training Log
« Reply #17 on: January 31, 2018, 09:57:47 AM »
I struggled for years doing a similar program to yours and never saw much improvement.  (Maxed out at low ESP/SSP Expert for longer than I'd care to admit) 

Then I got on to Steve Anderson's Refinement and Repetition.  He has a pretty good podcast too, That Shooting Show.  If you listen, you'll hear him preach about his 12 drills.  They're the first 12 drills out of Refinement and Repetition.  Do each one for x-number of minutes a night and you'll see results, blah, blah, blah. 

So I tried it for a month, just two mintues/drill (about 35 minutes/night total).  At my next match, I won top overall (80+ people).

Buy the book and listen to his podcast to hear how it should be applied (he's a bit of an oddball, fair warning).  You'll save yourself years of aggravation.
Thank you for the feedback.  I will check out Anderson's stuff.

Offline Chemsoldier

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Re: Chemsoldier's Pistol Training Log
« Reply #18 on: February 24, 2018, 11:14:05 AM »
Allright. After a bunch of time in the field and a week of just being lazy I am back at it.

24 Feb 2018: Did the basic dryfire routine mentioned above. (1 day of dryfire)