Author Topic: More Antibiotic Alternatives- Sugardyne  (Read 10343 times)

Sandman

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More Antibiotic Alternatives- Sugardyne
« on: June 10, 2009, 10:56:56 PM »
Sugar Therapy for Wound Management

When someone gets a wound in the field, and medical facilities are not an option, the First Responder or Primary Care Provider must treat and manage the wound him/herself. One of the biggest risks with wounds is infection. Time is important as the wound needs to be treated immediately to provide the greatest chance of avoiding infection.

If the medic has access to antibiotics such as Cefoxitin or Unasyn, and the training and resources to use them properly, that's great.

If however the medic doesn't have the proper antibiotics available or can't afford them, then alternatives are indicated.

One such proven alternative is Sugar Therapy. Both sugar and honey have been used for thousands of years to keep wounds from getting infected, and to treat those wounds that are already infected.

According to the European Journal of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases (1988, pg.525), the use of granulated sugar for the treatment of wounds is not only practical, but may also be a treatment of first choice. And researchers Jorge Chirife & Leon Herszage claim that granulated sugar is a nonspecific universal antimicrobial agent in their study of bacterial growth inhibition in concentrated sugar solutions:

http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?artid=184812

Here are the basic steps for wound management with household granulated sugar:

1. Control bleeding (direct pressure & elevation, or a pressure bandage, pressure points, etc.)
2. Irrigate the wound (flush it out with purified water so it's free of contaminates)
3. Debride the wound (trim off any damaged tissue)
4. Bandage normally & wait a few hours to ensure the bleeding has stopped and is not likely to return.
5. Pour sugar into a deep wound & fill it completely. If it's a shallow superficial wound, form a salve with heated vegetable lard or Vaseline so that the sugar will stick to the wound. Don't use water.
6. Re-bandage the wound.
7. Change out the sugar by irrigation & repacking the wound from 1 to 4 times a day in order to refresh its action. Otherwise, it will become counterproductive by absorbing body fluid secretions, forming a diluted syrup that will become food for the bacteria, complicating the injury.

This treatment can take from several days to several weeks to heal an infected wound.

If you have Providone-iodine (PI) handy, you can increase the potential of this sugar treatment by soaking the sugar in the PI to create a Sugar/PI salve. Replace the sugar in the wound with the sugar/PI salve. And, whenever dressing the wound, add a PI-soaked gauze sponge directly over the wound, under the dressing.

The sugar/PI salve is also made commercially under the name of Sugardyne. It's basically a 66%-80% sugar, and 20%-33% Providone iodine (10%) salve used for wounds and thresh in horses. But, it's so easy to make, and so universal in application, that you can easily make up and store large batches yourself.

Here are a couple of links on Sugardyne/Sugardine:

http://www.horses-and-ponies.com/health/sugardine.shtml
http://www.medscape.com/druginfo/dosage?drugid=88600&drugname=Sugardyne+Top&monotype=default&cid=med

Sugar as a wound treatment comes from the ancient use of honey in wound management. The ancient Egyptians used to pack honey into wounds to keep them from getting infected.

Here's some info. on honey's use in wound management:

http://www.worldwidewounds.com/2001/november/Molan/honey-as-topical-agent.html

http://www.appliedhealth.com/nutri/page3079.php

This last link shows abstracts of different therapies, including honey as well as maggot debridement therapy (MDT).

In conclusion, if you're in a desperate situation, and you don't have antibiotics for wound care, you can still have strong wound therapy options in your first-aid or trauma kit. Make up a cheap homemade batch of Sugardyne, and keep a small crush-proof bottle in your first-aid kit. Then store the rest in bottles in your portable medicine chest, along with your herbal alternatives to antibiotics, other healing herbal preparations, meds, disinfectants, IV kits, surgical kit, and bandages, airways, etc. You do have a portable medicine chest, don't you?

Peace.

(Disclaimer: I'm not a doctor, nor do I give medical advice. This excerpt is for informational purposes only.)

- referenced from Ditch Medicine, by Dr. Hugh L. Coffee, and The Herbal Medicine-Maker's Handbook, by James Green.

sage0925

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Re: More Antibiotic Alternatives- Sugardyne
« Reply #1 on: June 10, 2009, 11:11:01 PM »
Honey will do the same thing...but it's messy and really sticky.

Sandman

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Re: More Antibiotic Alternatives- Sugardyne
« Reply #2 on: June 10, 2009, 11:18:57 PM »
Honey will do the same thing...but it's messy and really sticky.
Yup, sure enough.

But yeah, cleaning the woulds of (much more expensive than sugar) honey a few times every day would be tough on everyone.
Scrub-a-dub-dub, yikes! Tough medicine for the ancient Egyptians, but better than dying of gas gangrene!


sage0925

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Re: More Antibiotic Alternatives- Sugardyne
« Reply #3 on: June 10, 2009, 11:29:19 PM »
You know...we don't use white sugar in cooking in our house...we bought some as a trade item, plus it was on sale for cheap at Wally World...I don't use it because it's hard on the liver and the kidneys (useless master's in nutrition)...I'm wondering what the chemical composition is that would make it such a good wound disinfectant.

Offline mash

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Re: More Antibiotic Alternatives- Sugardyne
« Reply #4 on: June 10, 2009, 11:30:53 PM »
Nice one Sandman +1

walker

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Re: More Antibiotic Alternatives- Sugardyne
« Reply #5 on: June 10, 2009, 11:54:57 PM »
Sandman,

Great post from a very good book (on my shelf too).

+1

I would only add to be sure to note that povidone-iodine (polyvinylpyrrolidone iodine; PVP-I, Betadine) is different than "regular" iodine (tincture of iodine), so be sure not to confuse the two.  The latter has been shown to be cytotoxic (kills your own cells) in wounds, and using large amounts in deep wounds could cause iodine toxicity particularly in young infants, fetuses, and those with thyroid problems.
« Last Edit: May 01, 2013, 12:24:10 AM by Archer »

Sandman

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Re: More Antibiotic Alternatives- Sugardyne
« Reply #6 on: June 11, 2009, 12:51:55 AM »
You know...we don't use white sugar in cooking in our house...we bought some as a trade item, plus it was on sale for cheap at Wally World...I don't use it because it's hard on the liver and the kidneys (useless master's in nutrition)...I'm wondering what the chemical composition is that would make it such a good wound disinfectant.
The chemistry behind sugar therapy I believe is that it is very absorbent. It tends to suck water thru osmotic action away from anything it touches. So when it touches microbes, it tends to desiccate them, causing them to stop reproducing & go dormant. In that way, it's similar to salt, but I'd NEVER advise rubbing salt into a wound, haha!

Interestingly enough, this action is also used in food preservation when you salt meat or sugar-preserve fruits into jams, etc. It inhibits the microbes very well.

As an aside, some people like to keep brown sugar for storage, but are concerned about its relatively short shelf-life. So, instead of storing brown sugar, they store granulated sugar + molassas. And when they need some brown sugar, they will mix the two for a home-made brown sugar on demand.

I never used to store much granulated sugar, but now I have some serious sugar reserves. Only now, they are stored with my medical supplies  ;D


Sandman

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Re: More Antibiotic Alternatives- Sugardyne
« Reply #7 on: June 11, 2009, 12:53:40 AM »
Nice one Sandman +1
!Muchos gracias!

Sandman

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Re: More Antibiotic Alternatives- Sugardyne
« Reply #8 on: June 11, 2009, 01:00:18 AM »
Sandman,

Great post from a very good book (on my shelf too).

+1

I would only add to be sure to note that povidone-iodine (polyvinylpyrrolidone iodine; PVP-I, Betadine) is different than "regular" iodine (tincture of iodine), so be sure not to confuse the two.  The latter has been shown to be cytotoxic (kills your own cells) in wounds, and using large amounts in deep wounds could cause iodine toxicity particularly in young infants, fetuses, and those with thyroid problems.

 
Thanks, scrubs!

I didn't know about the difference with tincture of iodine. Interesting. I keep a bottle of the tincture in my BoB as an additional dual-purpose water purification/antiseptic solution. I'll be sure to keep it out of deep or large wounds. I knew about the thyroid contraindications.

I've heard that Hydrogen Peroxide can also kill wounded cells it comes into contact with. It's observed when the open skin edges themselves turn white upon application, or so I've read.
« Last Edit: May 01, 2013, 01:07:52 AM by Archer »

Goatdog62

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Re: More Antibiotic Alternatives- Sugardyne
« Reply #9 on: June 11, 2009, 04:21:48 PM »
Another OUTSTANDING thread Sandman.


Here's my minor medical contribution of the day;

Original Listerine makes chigger bites stop itching. Works really well. Not the minty stuff, the nasty stuff.
« Last Edit: June 12, 2009, 11:52:57 AM by Goatdog62 »

Sandman

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Re: More Antibiotic Alternatives- Sugardyne
« Reply #10 on: June 11, 2009, 09:27:26 PM »
Another OUTSTANDING thread Sandman.


Here's my minor mediacl contribution of the day;

Original Listerine makes chigger bites stop itching. Works really well. Not the minty stuff, the nasty stuff.
Thanks GD. I'll have to try a sample bottle of orig. Listerine. I have plenty of chiggers down here to deal with!

Offline dudekrtr

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Re: More Antibiotic Alternatives- Sugardyne
« Reply #11 on: July 09, 2009, 11:39:56 PM »
Listerine has a whole bunch or uses.  http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/347473/alternative_uses_for_listerine_pg2.html?cat=5

There is a product called Alkalol, virtually the same as Listerine, which can be used in the nose. You might think that this would cause a bit of a burning sensation, but, it doesn't. It's a soothing antiseptic, and is often used in a little vessel called a "nasal douche".

By the way, pharmaceutical "simple syrup" is a solution of 88% sucrose. When they have you make it in the lab, you just keep stirring and stirring, thinking "how is all this going to go into that bit of water??" But, it does; hence the action of "absorbing" moisture. Had any lumps in your sugar bowl lately?
« Last Edit: July 09, 2009, 11:51:12 PM by dudekrtr »