Author Topic: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 1  (Read 111334 times)

sarahluker

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Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 1
« Reply #180 on: September 12, 2009, 08:56:20 PM »
Very innovative.  How does it feel tonight? 

Offline cohutt

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Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 1
« Reply #181 on: September 13, 2009, 05:32:30 AM »
Very innovative.  How does it feel tonight? 

It has felt better but all in all i think the splint workedas the swelling didn't come back; I iced it hard on and off for a couple hours after I came in.

I am going to give it a rest today-

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Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 1
« Reply #182 on: September 13, 2009, 05:43:17 PM »
No garden / fence / yard work today, so this post is off topic.


I made it a range day, too few and far between lately. 

Thank you John Browning for the 1911  ;D




Offline Roswell

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Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 1
« Reply #183 on: September 13, 2009, 06:12:27 PM »
nice shooting cohutt.  I heard there is a nice outdoor range in the Cohutta WMA.  Ever been there? I think it only costs $5 for parking

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Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 1
« Reply #184 on: September 13, 2009, 06:17:13 PM »
Never seen it. If I'm shooting up in the Cohuttas it is on my own property

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Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 1
« Reply #185 on: September 18, 2009, 06:33:29 PM »
It has been mosquito heaven here for a few days.  stagnant, wet, mostly overcast with rain avery day or so and no sun to dry up the breeding pools.  The asian tigers that have normally been dominant aren't around as much; the small balck ones are all over now. These buggers are stealthy and persistent in great numbers.  Because of these, I have done very little during the evening and neglegted some of the tasks i needed done as i continue to transition to my fall garden.

Tonight i put on long sleeved, a boonie and a smelly mosquito head net and got some stuff done.  The skies cleared as little late this afternoon and I snapped a couple of pics of the broccoli siince it wasn't so gloomy.

It has really taken off-




I've taken the covers off my shade structure and will lift the frame and store for next summer. The corn stalks are up and the roots chopped in well. 

More brocs below; I noticed something when loading the picture that I'll take care of tommorrow too.  The front left plant is actually twins.  oops.


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Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 1
« Reply #186 on: September 18, 2009, 06:54:45 PM »
Crackberry picture of mosquito man from last week


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Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 1
« Reply #187 on: September 26, 2009, 08:30:14 PM »
I spent the last 3 hours putting measurements of my backyard into the start of a master plotting of my backyard.

Why bother?   I have so many ideas screaming through my head right now I felt the need to slow down and do some planning.  Otherwise I am certain I'd end up with a cluster-fyrk of well intentioned plantings that mature into an inefficient mess.

I have a copy of MS Office Visio 03 that I had never messed with until tonight. I've been measuring everything back there in the few op portunites I have had over the last couple of weeks (monsoon season here apparently).

The back of my house is the left border of this jpeg; a public alley runs along the bottom border. North is roughly toward the upper left corner, so the sun travels from the upper right corner towards the lower left, sort of....

I roughed in the patio, little house, the boxwood garden and of course the modest raised bed plot I've been posting about for the last 4 months.  I have left out the trees I am removing any day now.  The blue circle in the center is the town's original fire bell- a huge iron thing that has been upside down in this property's backyard used as a birdbath for the last 75 or 80 years.

The best sunlight I got in the middle of the summer is where the raised bed is centered.  The entire back half of the property (the right half of the picture) has been  canopied by mostly junk trees; they are along the back border and the back half of the alleyway border.

Note the two bushes at the bottom that appear to be in the middle of the alley. These are model raspberry and blueberry bushes I fixed the proportions on for cutting/pasting into the design once i decide how many and where.  I parked the templates down there and didn't think they'd show in the jpeg'd version of this plot but there they are.  

edited to add: the dimensions are roughly 160 ft x 70 ft



sarahluker

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Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 1
« Reply #188 on: September 26, 2009, 09:10:08 PM »
You are blessed with a great amount of space to work with.  I can see why you would want to plan it out for optimal usage.  We have .20 acre lot and I would love to have a few acres to work with.  BTW are you going to be able to keep any of the wood from the trees?

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Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 1
« Reply #189 on: September 26, 2009, 09:58:24 PM »
My lot is only .4 acre I believe>>

I could keep it but I have no use here- fireplaces aren't functional and I have wood up to my ears at the BOL and another 120 acres of it still on the stump.  Not worth the trouble to haul it up there. 

sarahluker

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Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 1
« Reply #190 on: September 26, 2009, 10:03:28 PM »
I guess I didn't realize you and Mrs C.  have a bol, but still almost a half acre lets you get a good amount of food grown.  Our house is our bug in location.  I can't convince my husband that some land up in east Texas would be smart.  Someday maybe.   BTW the garden looks great.  How will you put up the broccoli?  In the freezer?

Offline jvodak

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Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 1
« Reply #191 on: September 27, 2009, 05:26:45 AM »
I just really love what you've done... very aesthetically pleasing AND productive. I really like the water capture system you made as well, looks pretty heavy duty.  I bought a 32 gallon trash can from Lowe's.  It isn't as nice as yours but I'm amazed at how much water it collects with just a misting in the air, darn thing has been full most of the time.  I give each of my square about 2 cups of water a day when it doesn't rain.  I use up about half a the trash can's contents so about 16 gallons or so to water the garden.  ALL FREE!

Fred_47460

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Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 1
« Reply #192 on: September 27, 2009, 06:00:02 AM »
Kinda spooky how cutting down that row of brush opened up your yard to the alleyway though! Which direction is your alley from your yard? Could you put up some kind of privacy fence without blocking sunlight?? Perhaps a "privacy fence" made from terraced planting boxes?

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Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 1
« Reply #193 on: September 27, 2009, 06:42:50 AM »
Kinda spooky how cutting down that row of brush opened up your yard to the alleyway though! Which direction is your alley from your yard? Could you put up some kind of privacy fence without blocking sunlight?? Perhaps a "privacy fence" made from terraced planting boxes?

Fred,

Mrs thought it was a little creepy too bu later said she didn't mind if people could see in if there was a secure fence up.

The alley runs down the southwest side of the yard, which is the bottom border of the plot jpeg above.  The "gate" half way back is about where my compost set up is now.

I have some ideas on the fence; part of the reason the privet had to go was the space is ate up both from it's footprint and the shade factor.  After removing it, I find that it left a 7' wide strip down the side where nothing grew but privet and ivy.   Basically the hedge was creeping into the yard over the years and was 4' thick with enough overhang and height to shade out another 3'.   A 6' or 7' solid privacy fence would have a smaller footprint obviously but would still shade a good bit in the late afternoon. 

What I am thinking of is a combination of wood and heavier gauge wire.  I will use 4x4 treated posts for the whole run and frame each panel with wood.  There are livestock panels of extremely heavy gauge galvanized wire that run 16' long and 5' tall; the horse panels would be tight enough that they wouldn't provide a good foothold to scale over the fence from.  Regardless of what is below I plan to run wire along the top that can support grapes or other climbers; I figure barbed wire might send the right message or even plain fence wire on insulated posts.  I don't know if I could or would run a charge on it to make a true electric topped fence; maybe the illusion would suffice.

I plan on using productive plantings as a partial privacy screen in the sections where i have wire.  In the dead of winter I might stick a bamboo reed rolled fence section up on the wire - who knows.  This is part of the reason I decided i needed to really slow down and do some planning first.

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Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 1
« Reply #194 on: September 27, 2009, 06:56:24 AM »
I just really love what you've done... very aesthetically pleasing AND productive. I really like the water capture system you made as well, looks pretty heavy duty.  I bought a 32 gallon trash can from Lowe's.  It isn't as nice as yours but I'm amazed at how much water it collects with just a misting in the air, darn thing has been full most of the time.  I give each of my square about 2 cups of water a day when it doesn't rain.  I use up about half a the trash can's contents so about 16 gallons or so to water the garden.  ALL FREE!

Thanks.  I hear you on the cool factor once you start actually using it.
I watered my garden for 16 days of 95 degree weather where there wasn't a cloud in the sky and only drained the system down by a little more than 1/3.   

You remind me I still have work to do on the overflow setup for this thing.  I've been putting it off.

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Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 1
« Reply #195 on: September 27, 2009, 07:20:17 AM »
I guess I didn't realize you and Mrs C.  have a bol, but still almost a half acre lets you get a good amount of food grown.  Our house is our bug in location.  I can't convince my husband that some land up in east Texas would be smart.  Someday maybe.   BTW the garden looks great.  How will you put up the broccoli?  In the freezer?

BOL is acreage about 2 hours from here adjacent to the Cohutta Wilderness.  Lot's of things going for it including it is paid for, what is already planted there and a great security layout when access and neighbors are considered.  My avatar is the cabin on the property-
What it doesn't have going for it is we have partners- my bro in law (her brother) and his wife.  Nice folks but not looking to do the sorts of things I want to do; more interested in keeping the grass around the cabin mowed and putting cute things on the tables etc.  He decided the blueberry bushes were too tall for easy picking so the dumbass cut everyone of them back last winter, all 50 or 60, and we had ZERO harvest this year.   He never bothered to look up anything on them or ask anyone, just did it thinking he was doing something good.
See what I mean?   
They live in Atlanta and have a kid in private school and on that treadmill; they decided they wanted to sell it so "we" could buy a lake house that wpuld have less upkeep (hahahaha still laughing on that) and I told them sure we could sell it, but I would be rolling my portion into something else that is 100% paid for and owned by me.  I think they have gotten more realistic on the valuation so who knows, maybe soon I get to start over on a new BOL with a prepper's perspective from day 1.

In the meantime it is a hell of a place to hang out and work on when I have the time.

My neighborhood here is the original downtown one from when the city was founded in the mid 1800s; it is national historical district so we have rules on exterior mods and other stuff but it is a good think imho; not like HOS issues arbitrarily applied in other nightmare scenarios I have heard of.   
The original lots are pretty small here- ours is one of the exceptions in that it is deep and flat. Unfortunately due to the tight quarters there are a lot of very old hardwoods in neighbor's yards that love the space over my yard; even after dropping all the southern and western exposure trees I will still have some areas that won't be fully productive, mainly in the early part of the day.   This isn't entirely a bad thing but something to work around.

Broc goes into the freezer - plan is to freeze most of the heads and eat the side shoots til freeze do us part.

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Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 1
« Reply #196 on: September 29, 2009, 04:40:54 AM »
No turning back now.   My world will have sun soon.


Thanks Jack, thanks Dervaes family.   

Apprehension <<ON>>

 ;)


Offline Roswell

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Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 1
« Reply #197 on: September 30, 2009, 07:04:54 AM »
BOL is acreage about 2 hours from here adjacent to the Cohutta Wilderness.  Lot's of things going for it including it is paid for, what is already planted there and a great security layout when access and neighbors are considered.  My avatar is the cabin on the property-
What it doesn't have going for it is we have partners- my bro in law (her brother) and his wife.  Nice folks but not looking to do the sorts of things I want to do; more interested in keeping the grass around the cabin mowed and putting cute things on the tables etc.  He decided the blueberry bushes were too tall for easy picking so the dumbass cut everyone of them back last winter, all 50 or 60, and we had ZERO harvest this year.   He never bothered to look up anything on them or ask anyone, just did it thinking he was doing something good.
See what I mean?

Son of a bitch! You kick his ass Cohutt?

By the way, thanks for the idea on the broccoli. I planted some early dividends a week or two ago after seeing yours

Offline pchambers

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Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 1
« Reply #198 on: September 30, 2009, 07:16:55 AM »
BOL is acreage about 2 hours from here adjacent to the Cohutta Wilderness.  Lot's of things going for it including it is paid for, what is already planted there and a great security layout when access and neighbors are considered.  My avatar is the cabin on the property-

Oh love the Cohutta area!  We have an old favorite camping spot up there called, for the lack of any other name, the Big Damn Field.  Looking into buying land in the next year or two.  Lots of "mountain" land for sale, but I've been shying away from that sort because I think that a large producing garden will be elusive on the hilly sides.  How's your BOL in relation to elevation/terrain.

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Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 1
« Reply #199 on: September 30, 2009, 06:41:06 PM »
133 total, 14 or so open, the rest mixed hardwoods and from rolling to straight up/down. (On the east side in Fannin Co)
The bottom land is the open land and is scraggly pasture right now but could be productive again.  The original water diversion trenches are still intact way up the grade form the edge of the open land.  Originally most of the Cohuttas was clear cut into the 1930s; the mountain folks had to dig the trenches to keep the water running off the mountain from wiping out the crops.

The cabin is in a corner in the open land with a "crik" flowing through & the property goes over the mountain the cabin faces. 

From the cabin:



to the cabin:


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Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 1
« Reply #200 on: September 30, 2009, 06:56:55 PM »
pchambers,
I forgot to post- the campsite area you are talking about is probably  "Bray Field" on the Conasauga River & trail where Tearbritches hits the river bottom

Roswell,

I've been fighting leaf eating critters on my brocs- i had it under control with a Neem oil spray but the constant rain lately washed it off as fast as I could put it on.   The break in the weather this week seems to have helped

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Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 1
« Reply #201 on: October 01, 2009, 08:08:20 PM »
Have you ever made a series of decisions moving towards something then one morning you wake up to realize that you had passed the point of no return?

 ???

When I made the decision to get serious about my backyard I had a definite picture in my mind of what it will be when done.  It will take some time to get it there and I'm OK with that, thankfully Mrs C says she is too. 

But when in a few days you go from this (the background):



to this:










Well, it kind of puts it all out there, you know, the cat's out of the bag and all that...... 

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Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 1
« Reply #202 on: October 01, 2009, 08:24:29 PM »
yeah, you need to get that fence up soon, but I am sure when you are done it is going to look really nice

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Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 1
« Reply #203 on: October 01, 2009, 08:25:38 PM »
Well obviously I can't sit still, I had to get busy and finish prepping the alley side border so I can sink some fence posts this weekend.  

A Master Gardener friend came by a few days ago when I was manually digging up the privet stumps & roots and told me to stop and wait until she got back to me. She wouldn't say why but told me to trust her, that she had something for me if I was insistent on doing all this myself.

Fast forward to today when she brought me a tool I didn't even know existed, and it is now in my possesion, on loan from the local Master Gardeners association.

It is a "Weed Wrench" (http://www.weedwrench.com/), the big model, and it works pretty damn well.  I got out there at 7 and by 8 I had a nice pile of privet stumps pulled, some of the ones I had been dreading.

I highly recommend this tool, probably best borrowed or rented unless you have a lot of this type of vermin plant to pull.  It costs $180.

After a short but intense session of privet pulling, I had a nice pile and no pulled muscles in my back.







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Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 1
« Reply #204 on: October 01, 2009, 08:35:40 PM »
Yeah Roswell- I'm feeling pretty nekkid out back right now.   I did patch back the 6' welded wire fence along the border and it is in good shape (mostly) along the part next to my garden (and close to my house).  It is enough to keep casual opportunists from just walking it to check things out but won't keep anyone serious out.


Subject change:

I turned a bin of what is some of the best compost I've managed to brew so far.  Damn this stuff looks and smells so frikkin good!   




Hare of Caerbannog

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Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 1
« Reply #205 on: October 04, 2009, 05:39:25 PM »
Wow!
cohutt, dude, I have been busy and haven't been able to follow the threads that I normally watch.
Your pics are great!
That new soil is awesome!
Great pile of new compost you have there!
My wife was watching over my shoulder as I was checking your thread and she asked, "Do you have compost envy?"
I was like, "Yea! What do you think? Look at that! I have to beg the neighbors for leaves and this guy has That pile of compost!"
Good Job cohutt!
Thanks for the updates!

sarahluker

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Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 1
« Reply #206 on: October 04, 2009, 06:54:59 PM »
Hey Cohutt,  do you know the difference between naked and necked?   Naked is being without clothing, but necked is being without clothing and up to no good!  My bible class teacher told us that believe it or not.

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Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 1
« Reply #207 on: October 04, 2009, 07:31:40 PM »
HoC,
Thanks, anyone can do the compost thang given access to "stuff".   The chips piled in the back (the ones that were junk trees a week ago) are steaming hot right now- bizarre since they've only there a few days.  Hot to the touch an inch below the surface, steaming.

sarahl, Lewis Grizzard was first I heard to say that. 


I spent the weekend pulling the rest of the privet, cleaning the fence line, laying out the mason line, diggin post holes and setting posts.  A friend loaned me a 1 man auger but it has a bad carb on it or something.   The heavy bar and post hole diggers got 2/3 of them done.  The other 7 on this run will have to wait a few days.

I enjoyed the long weekend of work BUT at 49 I feel like I've been trampled by a herd of caribou. 

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Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 1
« Reply #208 on: October 05, 2009, 07:38:09 PM »
By the time I got home from work I was determined to get those two last posts in- I can't start tacking up the stringers until these are set and cured for a couple days, so I got out in the mud.  (On what was the last "dig" shaping the hole for the 2nd post I broke my frikkin post hole diggers. DOH!)

Now Mrs Cohutt can tell a fence is going in and is seeing things a little more optimistically. (the posts in the top pic are actually dead on straight but the pic makes the look bent).






Also, I kicked the top couple of inches of one of the wood chip piles to see if it was still cooking.  Check it out, you can see the steam rising;  the grey stuff is very warm to the touch as this breaks down.  Odd, this is so soon after the shredder spit it all out last week, I guess the high nitrogen/oxygen combination lit it off. hmmmm





(I realize this thread has turned into an overkill snoozer but a while back I figured I'd see the first year through in detail so I'd have a journal to go back and review.  I've tried some new things and learned through trial and error here, hopefully some of you might do the same.  ;) )

Offline soccer grannie

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Re: Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 1
« Reply #209 on: October 05, 2009, 08:03:55 PM »
(I realize this thread has turned into an overkill snoozer but a while back I figured I'd see the first year through in detail so I'd have a journal to go back and review. I've tried some new things and learned through trial and error here, hopefully some of you might do the same. ;) )

Cohutt: Your thread is far from an "overkill snoozer". In fact, watching the progress of your garden has really inspired me. I'm taking photos of our 1 acre of nothing but grass. Can't wait to compare my photos next Spring when the dirt is actually producing something.

I'm looking forward to Cohutt builds a garden, Chapter 2.