Author Topic: Getting Rid of Stray Cats... Ethically  (Read 2092 times)

Offline Ranger Red

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Re: Getting Rid of Stray Cats... Ethically
« Reply #30 on: October 25, 2018, 02:51:44 PM »
I'm sorry but this post struck a familiar cord as I'm battling the same problem myself. I live on a large wooded lot in town with a creek in the back and I often see deer, coyotes, turkey and on one occasion a bobcat. I do not care for all the stray cats that also show up as they are the only ones who defecate and urinate in my flower bed, climb on my car scratching the hood, sleeping in my patio furniture leaving hair and muddy foot prints on the cushions.

In my area it is legal to trap any animal that enters my property as a nuisance animal as we have leash laws for both dogs and cats. I DO NOT advocate killing any animal that may be someones pet. I trap and call the animal control officer or take them to the shelter myself. If its a stray and I can't trap them, I discourage them by shooting them with a paintball gun. I figure if it comes home with enough orange paint on it you will question it and keep it home and the sting of the paintballs discourages them from coming back. I also use cage type traps.

So in answer to the post, ethically I recommend using a cage type trap and if your in an area that permits it use the paintball gun to keep them out of your yard. I recommend the cage traps because it makes it easier to transport them. I have also used foothold traps but it makes getting the animal out tougher. You have to throw a heavy blanket over them and try to release the trap jaws. Not too bad for a cat but a 30# racoon is a whole nuther ball game. Also you can minimize catching skunks if cats are your problem by elevating the trap to a table top. Cats will jump up on a table. Coons will find a way when you least expect it but skunks don't jump.

Offline mountainmoma

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Re: Getting Rid of Stray Cats... Ethically
« Reply #31 on: October 25, 2018, 05:31:42 PM »
I'm sorry but this post struck a familiar cord as I'm battling the same problem myself. I live on a large wooded lot in town with a creek in the back and I often see deer, coyotes, turkey and on one occasion a bobcat. I do not care for all the stray cats that also show up as they are the only ones who defecate and urinate in my flower bed, climb on my car scratching the hood, sleeping in my patio furniture leaving hair and muddy foot prints on the cushions.

In my area it is legal to trap any animal that enters my property as a nuisance animal as we have leash laws for both dogs and cats. I DO NOT advocate killing any animal that may be someones pet. I trap and call the animal control officer or take them to the shelter myself. If its a stray and I can't trap them, I discourage them by shooting them with a paintball gun. I figure if it comes home with enough orange paint on it you will question it and keep it home and the sting of the paintballs discourages them from coming back. I also use cage type traps.

So in answer to the post, ethically I recommend using a cage type trap and if your in an area that permits it use the paintball gun to keep them out of your yard. I recommend the cage traps because it makes it easier to transport them. I have also used foothold traps but it makes getting the animal out tougher. You have to throw a heavy blanket over them and try to release the trap jaws. Not too bad for a cat but a 30# racoon is a whole nuther ball game. Also you can minimize catching skunks if cats are your problem by elevating the trap to a table top. Cats will jump up on a table. Coons will find a way when you least expect it but skunks don't jump.

cats are small, you would get prosecuted for hitting one with a paintball as that could do some damage to the cat, realy not the thing to do.  You would be prosecuted under the laws for cruelty to animals, no matter what animal, domestic or wild actually.  Look at the link I gave some posts up for legal and ethical deterrents.  If you are wanting to project something to deter a housecat, use a water gun, a super soaker.  Or, just have the motion sensor scarcrow sprinkler. Do not shoot peoples pets with any projectile ( unless you are protecting yourself or your livestock, of course. But domestic cats are not a danger to life and limb...)   If you catch a tame cat, a pet in a live trap, you need to release it if it is obvious it is one of your neighbors pets, knowingly relocating someones pet is not legal or ethical.   Around here, if it is not that tame, but has a notched ear, you also need to release it as it is a "pet" feral cat, in other words it has been thru animal control already, given shots, spayed and has been legally released and is being fed and taken care of by someone in the area.  Check with your county if you have a similar program.

I am curious what State and county you are in as I have never heard of such laws for cats.  What state is this ?
« Last Edit: October 25, 2018, 05:39:39 PM by mountainmoma »

Offline Docwatmo

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Re: Getting Rid of Stray Cats... Ethically
« Reply #32 on: October 25, 2018, 08:24:26 PM »
In my county, we have the same leash laws for cats and dogs.    You may live trap any animal that enters your property.  You must identify the animal and ensure it is not an endangered species (Like the Ornate Box Turtle), in which case you are required to release it at the edge of your property.    If it is not an endangered species, you may turn it in to animal control.  The only stipulation is if you trap a known pet on your property and you can identify the owner, you must contact the owner the first and second time.  If you catch it a third or consecutive time on your property, you may turn it over to animal control without notifying the owner.   

I was wondering about the notched ears in our area, and checked with the local humane society and they don't do that in this county.  It's strictly a volunteer function.  But even if they have notched ears, they still fall under the same code of ordinances.   





Offline mountainmoma

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Re: Getting Rid of Stray Cats... Ethically
« Reply #33 on: October 25, 2018, 08:33:32 PM »
In my county, we have the same leash laws for cats and dogs.    You may live trap any animal that enters your property.  You must identify the animal and ensure it is not an endangered species (Like the Ornate Box Turtle), in which case you are required to release it at the edge of your property.    If it is not an endangered species, you may turn it in to animal control.  The only stipulation is if you trap a known pet on your property and you can identify the owner, you must contact the owner the first and second time.  If you catch it a third or consecutive time on your property, you may turn it over to animal control without notifying the owner.   

I was wondering about the notched ears in our area, and checked with the local humane society and they don't do that in this county.  It's strictly a volunteer function.  But even if they have notched ears, they still fall under the same code of ordinances.   

so, what county is that ?  I realy am curious.  Do they say how any of this can possibly be applied to cats ?  People think we are over legislated out here and illogical, which is often the case, but in this regard we are logical and the nature of cats is acknowledged.  No-one on this thread has said, so do you all not have cats ?  How in any practical way do you see cats able to abide these types of regulations ?  I would love to hear how you or your neighbors have trained cats to "stay" . I mean it.  DO you see cats only on leashes where you live ?

So, second question is, do you agree with this ?  Do you think it is practicle for cats ?

Offline Docwatmo

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Re: Getting Rid of Stray Cats... Ethically
« Reply #34 on: October 26, 2018, 06:41:21 AM »
Yes, I have owned cats.  I love cats, equally to dogs.   And any pet can be a nuisance if not controlled by their owner.  My cat's were all indoor cats, I didn't let them roam the neighborhood because they were my responsibility.   If my cats were roaming and my neighbor had a complaint about them, I take full responsibility for them.    Stray's and dumped cats are a different story.  They have no human responsible for them.  The regulations simply protect property rights (One of the few laws that actually support liberty) and they apply across the board.  No treating any animals or people differently.  (Unless they are an endangered species).   

Thus humanely trapping them and turning them over to animal control is a simple, viable and perfectly acceptable option.   

Offline Ranger Red

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Re: Getting Rid of Stray Cats... Ethically
« Reply #35 on: October 26, 2018, 07:40:56 AM »
so, what county is that ?  I realy am curious.  Do they say how any of this can possibly be applied to cats ?  People think we are over legislated out here and illogical, which is often the case, but in this regard we are logical and the nature of cats is acknowledged.  No-one on this thread has said, so do you all not have cats ?  How in any practical way do you see cats able to abide these types of regulations ?  I would love to hear how you or your neighbors have trained cats to "stay" . I mean it.  DO you see cats only on leashes where you live ?

So, second question is, do you agree with this ?  Do you think it is practicle for cats ?

Yes the same way you do a dog. It gets a leash when its outside. If you can't keep your dog in your yard you put it on a tether same thing with cats. Yes it is practical for cats.
Below is our city ordinance for animals. If you note the ordinance says all animals and the definition for all animals includes cats. And a paintball is not going to hurt them my kids and I used to play. Stings like hell but it provides no lasting injury.

6.08.010 - Impounding animals at large.
A.It shall be the duty of the police officer or the animal control officer or designated agent to capture or take into custody and impound all animals at large within the corporate limits of the city. If the animal so running at large cannot be captured by the officer or designated agent and represents a threat to persons or other animals, it shall be lawful for the officer to tranquilize or kill any such animal by any available means.
B.The animal control officer for the city may impound any animal observed to be at large, whether the animal is on public or private property, subject to the applicable provision of the law. If the animal control officer observes an animal on property which is owned by a person other than the owner of the animal, and observes the animal return to the property of its owner, the animal control officer may impound the animal or issue a citation for the animal running at large. In the event the animal is on private property or property of the animal's owner, the animal control officer, his/her agent, or police officer may enter the property, other than a private dwelling for the purpose of impoundment or issuance of a citation, or both, subject to the applicable provisions of this title and law.
C.Proof that an animal was found at large in violation of this section, together with proof that the defendant was the owner of such animal at the time, shall constitute prima facie evidence that the defendant allowed or permitted the animal to be at large.
D.Any dog or pup shall be deemed to be running at large when found off the real property of the owner and not under restraint. It shall be lawful for the animal control officer to pursue and capture such animals running at large and to enter a private property, as defined in Section 6.04.020

C.Any police officer or animal control officer, may take charge of any animal found running at large, injured, abandoned or showing evidence of cruel neglect upon either private or public property and inspect, care for, treat or transport such animal to the animal shelter for disposition.
D.Any law enforcement officer, including the animal control officer or designated agent, shall be authorized to use a tranquilizer gun, and further shall be authorized to kill any animal which it is impractical or impossible to capture or tranquilize and that is endangering persons, other animal or property.
(Ord. G-1011 § 1 (part), 2007: Ord. G-1001 § 1 (part), 2007)

6.08.011 - Keeping and feeding stray animals—Requirements, failure to surrender.
A.It is unlawful for any person to knowingly and intentionally to harbor, feed, keep in possession by confinement, or otherwise allow to remain on their property any animal which does not belong to him or her, it shall be the duty of the owner of the property to notify the animal control officer of the animal. Upon receiving such notice, the animal control officer or person duly authorized by the city manager shall take such animal and place it in the animal shelter. B.It is unlawful for any person to refuse to surrender any such stray animal to the animal control officer or person duly authorized by the city manager upon demand.

"Animals" means all warm-blooded vertebrate animals such as, but not limited to bovine cattle, horses and other equines, swine, goats, rabbits, sheep, dogs, cats, chickens, ducks, geese, turkeys, pigeons and other wild mammals, or birds that have been tamed, domesticated or captivated, but shall exclude small cage birds or aquatic and amphibian animals kept solely as pets.

"At large." An animal shall be deemed to be at large if off the premises of its owner and not under the immediate responsive control of a responsible person.

"Public nuisance" means any animal or animals which:

1.Molests passers-by or passing vehicles;
2.Attacks person(s) or other animals;
3.Trespasses on school grounds;
4.Is repeatedly at large specifically, three or more times per twelve (12) month period;
5.Damages private or public property;
6.Barks, whines or howls in an excessive, continuous or untimely fashion; or
7.Deposits excretory matter on property other than that of the owner. Repeatedly defecates on property not belonging to or under the control of its owner, unless such waste is immediately removed and properly disposed of by the owner of the animal (including domestic cats);
8.Produce odors or unclean conditions sufficient to annoy persons living in the vicinity; or
9.Is unconfined when in heat

Offline Docwatmo

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Re: Getting Rid of Stray Cats... Ethically
« Reply #36 on: October 26, 2018, 10:02:21 AM »


6.08.011 - Keeping and feeding stray animals—Requirements, failure to surrender.
A.It is unlawful for any person to knowingly and intentionally to harbor, feed, keep in possession by confinement, or otherwise allow to remain on their property any animal which does not belong to him or her, it shall be the duty of the owner of the property to notify the animal control officer of the animal. Upon receiving such notice, the animal control officer or person duly authorized by the city manager shall take such animal and place it in the animal shelter. B.It is unlawful for any person to refuse to surrender any such stray animal to the animal control officer or person duly authorized by the city manager upon demand.

This is an important part of the regulation.   Ours is missing the "Feeding of stray's" portion.  Knowingly feeding strays which causes them to remain in the area needs to be included.  This prevents attrition and natural territorial spread of pray species from occurring which naturally helps to maintain the population. 

Offline David in MN

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Re: Getting Rid of Stray Cats... Ethically
« Reply #37 on: October 26, 2018, 10:19:44 AM »
We have a lot of laws about feeding  wild animals but they're rarely enforced because it's kind of viewed lie a jerk thing to hassle the nicce lady who wants to put out food for the deer. It can get into weird stuff about luring prey and messy things near parks and state land but for the most part it's an unenforced law.

I don't think it's legal to shoot paintball here either. I wouldn't be seen with an airsoft outside for fear that I'd get a police visit. We're pretty cool about hunting and shooting but you just don't have one out in public without getting bad attention.

Alot of the headache is being civil with the neighbors. Yes, letting strays run our block is a jerk move but so is trapping or calling the city. We can wax nostalgic about property rights and how I should be able to manage my land but I also want to crack a beer with the neighbor and not be "that guy". So if a little motion activated sprinkler or sound deterrent keeps my yard clear that's just fine. It's the unintrusive solution I really need.

Offline mountainmoma

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Re: Getting Rid of Stray Cats... Ethically
« Reply #38 on: October 26, 2018, 10:27:30 AM »
You guys still havent told me where such rules are, which county.  I need to make sure to never move there....


And, realy, you see cats walked around on leashes where you live and you think this makes sense and is practical ?  that is what I am asking. I do not doubt that crazy laws can be made. 

Do you see cats being walked around on leashes all over where you live ? It is one thing to have a law on the books that is impossible, and only enforced arbitrarily when someone complains, we have alot of those out here;  but do you think that is realy what goes n and is with the nature of cats ? You are seeing cats walked on leashes all the time  ?  Likely it is ignored in some places or other homes the cats are never allowed outside to hunt or run around.


Out here there is a difference between stray and feral, so when I use these words they are not interchangeable.  We are also not supposed to have stray animals, and they need to be brought in.  But most non-tame, feral, cats are legally someones pet, so you have t be thoughtful and check with your neighbors.  Why would you want to move your neighbors pet ?  The only difference between feeding a stray and a feral pet is responsibility, so a feral pet cat has been spayed/neutered and has shots, is being fed and cared for, some provision for shelter, some place to get out of the weather has to exist, does not mean inside the house.

I have read your areas rules you posted, you could definitely own a feral cat too in your area, many people do I am sure, so you should be considerate.


Offline Ranger Red

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Re: Getting Rid of Stray Cats... Ethically
« Reply #39 on: October 26, 2018, 10:28:23 AM »
This is an important part of the regulation.   Ours is missing the "Feeding of stray's" portion.  Knowingly feeding strays which causes them to remain in the area needs to be included.  This prevents attrition and natural territorial spread of pray species from occurring which naturally helps to maintain the population.

Very true. Even with a spay / neuter program these cats create other problems by spreading feline diseases to other non strays they might come in contact with. 5 of the most deadly feline diseases are only preventable by keeping them indoors away from other strays and ferals. There are 70 million stray and feral cats in the US. Prior to 2001 there was a large market for feral cat hides. Which is why I think there has been an increase in the number of strays since the law went into effect. Fur dealers used to go to pounds and picked up euthanized animals and skin them out. They would also trap cats in down town areas with trucks and box traps. You never knew they were there unless you happened to see them loading cats up.

Offline mountainmoma

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Re: Getting Rid of Stray Cats... Ethically
« Reply #40 on: October 26, 2018, 10:34:19 AM »
If you shoot and hit your neighbors pet with a projectile, it can be prosecuted under animal cruelty laws. That is "can" and "should", doesnt always happen.



Offline Ranger Red

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Re: Getting Rid of Stray Cats... Ethically
« Reply #41 on: October 26, 2018, 10:34:25 AM »
You guys still havent told me where such rules are, which county.  I need to make sure to never move there....


And, realy, you see cats walked around on leashes where you live and you think this makes sense and is practical ?  that is what I am asking. I do not doubt that crazy laws can be made. 

Do you see cats being walked around on leashes all over where you live ? It is one thing to have a law on the books that is impossible, and only enforced arbitrarily when someone complains, we have alot of those out here;  but do you think that is realy what goes n and is with the nature of cats ? You are seeing cats walked on leashes all the time  ?  Likely it is ignored in some places or other homes the cats are never allowed outside to hunt or run around.


Out here there is a difference between stray and feral, so when I use these words they are not interchangeable.  We are also not supposed to have stray animals, and they need to be brought in.  But most non-tame, feral, cats are legally someones pet, so you have t be thoughtful and check with your neighbors.  Why would you want to move your neighbors pet ?  The only difference between feeding a stray and a feral pet is responsibility, so a feral pet cat has been spayed/neutered and has shots, is being fed and cared for, some provision for shelter, some place to get out of the weather has to exist, does not mean inside the house.

I have read your areas rules you posted, you could definitely own a feral cat too in your area, many people do I am sure, so you should be considerate.

The ordinance states that unless you have full control over the animal it has to be on a leash. That means you have to be present and able to give a command and the animal obey it or its At Large and you are subject to fines. So no you can't have a feral cat roaming around the neighborhood.

Offline Zef_66

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Re: Getting Rid of Stray Cats... Ethically
« Reply #42 on: October 26, 2018, 10:42:06 AM »
It is wrong and illegal to trap all cats that come into your yard.   We have a forum policy to not advocate  illegal activity....
What is the federal regulation on this? I assume federal because you are making a general statement to people in different states. Curious to know what the law is on this. Can you cite it, please?

Offline Ranger Red

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Re: Getting Rid of Stray Cats... Ethically
« Reply #43 on: October 26, 2018, 10:44:43 AM »
If you shoot and hit your neighbors pet with a projectile, it can be prosecuted under animal cruelty laws. That is "can" and "should", doesnt always happen.

Here is our cruelty ordinance. So as long as I don't kill, maim, disfigure, torture, beat with any object, mutilate, burn or scald with any substance, or otherwise cruelly set upon any animals I'm golden in shooting it in the butt with a paintball. It does none of the aforementioned actions. In fact pepper spray is not allowed to be used on stray animals because it can burn the skin. And pepper is sometimes used as an animal deterrent in gardens to keep them from destroying crops.

6.16.010 - Cruelty to animals.
It is unlawful for any person to:

A.Willfully or maliciously kill, maim, disfigure, torture, beat with any object, mutilate, burn or scald with any substance, or otherwise cruelly set upon any animals; except that reasonable force may be employed to drive off dangerous animals;

B.Drive or work any animal cruelly or cruelly work any maimed, mutilated, infirm, sick or disabled animal, or cause, allow or permit the same to be done;

C.Have, keep or harbor any animal which is infected with any dangerous or incurable and/or painfully crippling condition except as hereinafter provided. The municipal court judge may order a person convicted of a violation of this subsection to turn the animal involved over to a designated humane society or animal shelter. All such animals taken by the designated agency may be destroyed humanely as soon thereafter as is conveniently possible. This section shall not be construed to include veterinary hospitals or animals under active veterinary care;

D.Sell or offer for sale, barter, give away, or use as an advertising device or promotional display, living baby chicks, rabbits, ducklings or other fowl, except pigeons, under two months of age in any quantity less than twelve (12); or to sell, offer for sale, barter, give away, or display animals or fowls as specified in this section, which have been dyed, colored or otherwise treated so as to impart to them an artificial or unnatural color; provided, however, that this section shall not be construed to prohibit the sale of animals or fowls as specified in this subsection; in proper facilities, by hatcheries or persons engaged in raising and selling such animals and fowls for recognized animal husbandry purposes;

E.Promote, state, hold, manage or in any way conduct any game, exhibition, contest or fight in which one or more animals are engaged for the purposes of injuring, killing, maiming or destroying themselves or any other animals;

F.Neglect or refuse to supply such animal with necessary and adequate care, food, drink, air, light, space, shelter or protection from the elements as necessary for health and well-being of such kind of animal;

G.Use, place, set out or deploy any above-ground animal trap that will damage or injure any animal when caught by the device or trap.

H.Use or facilitate combat between animal or between animals and humans.

Offline mountainmoma

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Re: Getting Rid of Stray Cats... Ethically
« Reply #44 on: October 26, 2018, 10:51:14 AM »
Yes, I have owned cats.  I love cats, equally to dogs.   And any pet can be a nuisance if not controlled by their owner.  My cat's were all indoor cats, I didn't let them roam the neighborhood because they were my responsibility.   If my cats were roaming and my neighbor had a complaint about them, I take full responsibility for them.    Stray's and dumped cats are a different story.  They have no human responsible for them.  The regulations simply protect property rights (One of the few laws that actually support liberty) and they apply across the board.  No treating any animals or people differently.  (Unless they are an endangered species).   

Thus humanely trapping them and turning them over to animal control is a simple, viable and perfectly acceptable option.

I agree with trapping and animal control, I mentioned that alot up thread.  I have just cautioned that you shouldnt relocate your neighbors pet cats, and so should check if they consider the cats their pets.  And, if they do consider them their pets, they may need to be reminded of what responsibilities that entails in some cases, of course. 

You kept your cats indoors.  That is fine, but did you go out walking them on a leash and train them to stay in your yard or can you acnowledge that they are not dogs ?  People do not have a right to let their cats go outside ? I do know that there are many people who think this way, out here they think this for the cats own protection.  Personally, I would rather be free than to live in jail, no matter that living free exposes me to others that carry disease and exposes me to the possibility of car accidents and such and give my cats the same consideration, but I do not live in a dense city.

It is not just about law, we are talking ethical

- Is it ethical to knowingly trap your neighbors pet cat, even if allowed under law ?

- Is it realy worse to have a house cat in your garden or walk on your car than a racoon ?  You guys dont have racoons ?  We had them even in the city, especially in downtown San Jose.  Should walking on your car be some kind of death or imprisonment sentence for another creature ?


Offline mountainmoma

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Re: Getting Rid of Stray Cats... Ethically
« Reply #45 on: October 26, 2018, 10:53:19 AM »
Here is our cruelty ordinance. So as long as I don't kill, maim, disfigure, torture, beat with any object, mutilate, burn or scald with any substance, or otherwise cruelly set upon any animals I'm golden in shooting it in the butt with a paintball. It does none of the aforementioned actions. In fact pepper spray is not allowed to be used on stray animals because it can burn the skin. And pepper is sometimes used as an animal deterrent in gardens to keep them from destroying crops.

6.16.010 - Cruelty to animals.
It is unlawful for any person to:

A.Willfully or maliciously kill, maim, disfigure, torture, beat with any object, mutilate, burn or scald with any substance, or otherwise cruelly set upon any animals; except that reasonable force may be employed to drive off dangerous animals;

B.Drive or work any animal cruelly or cruelly work any maimed, mutilated, infirm, sick or disabled animal, or cause, allow or permit the same to be done;

C.Have, keep or harbor any animal which is infected with any dangerous or incurable and/or painfully crippling condition except as hereinafter provided. The municipal court judge may order a person convicted of a violation of this subsection to turn the animal involved over to a designated humane society or animal shelter. All such animals taken by the designated agency may be destroyed humanely as soon thereafter as is conveniently possible. This section shall not be construed to include veterinary hospitals or animals under active veterinary care;

D.Sell or offer for sale, barter, give away, or use as an advertising device or promotional display, living baby chicks, rabbits, ducklings or other fowl, except pigeons, under two months of age in any quantity less than twelve (12); or to sell, offer for sale, barter, give away, or display animals or fowls as specified in this section, which have been dyed, colored or otherwise treated so as to impart to them an artificial or unnatural color; provided, however, that this section shall not be construed to prohibit the sale of animals or fowls as specified in this subsection; in proper facilities, by hatcheries or persons engaged in raising and selling such animals and fowls for recognized animal husbandry purposes;

E.Promote, state, hold, manage or in any way conduct any game, exhibition, contest or fight in which one or more animals are engaged for the purposes of injuring, killing, maiming or destroying themselves or any other animals;

F.Neglect or refuse to supply such animal with necessary and adequate care, food, drink, air, light, space, shelter or protection from the elements as necessary for health and well-being of such kind of animal;

G.Use, place, set out or deploy any above-ground animal trap that will damage or injure any animal when caught by the device or trap.

H.Use or facilitate combat between animal or between animals and humans.

If they wanted to, they would do it under the "otherwise cruelly set upon " section.  They cant list everything, so they have a general pace where they can prosecute anything. 

What county and state is this code from ?

Offline mountainmoma

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Re: Getting Rid of Stray Cats... Ethically
« Reply #46 on: October 26, 2018, 10:55:58 AM »
The ordinance states that unless you have full control over the animal it has to be on a leash. That means you have to be present and able to give a command and the animal obey it or its At Large and you are subject to fines. So no you can't have a feral cat roaming around the neighborhood.

what state and county ?

Offline Ranger Red

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Re: Getting Rid of Stray Cats... Ethically
« Reply #47 on: October 26, 2018, 11:04:36 AM »
what state and county ?

Pick one it doesn't matter. Most animal control statutes are based off each other unless its the case of a new thing like back when they started outlawing pit bulls in some municipalities.

Offline Ranger Red

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Re: Getting Rid of Stray Cats... Ethically
« Reply #48 on: October 26, 2018, 11:17:14 AM »
I agree with trapping and animal control, I mentioned that alot up thread.  I have just cautioned that you shouldnt relocate your neighbors pet cats, and so should check if they consider the cats their pets.  And, if they do consider them their pets, they may need to be reminded of what responsibilities that entails in some cases, of course. 

You kept your cats indoors.  That is fine, but did you go out walking them on a leash and train them to stay in your yard or can you acnowledge that they are not dogs ?  People do not have a right to let their cats go outside ? I do know that there are many people who think this way, out here they think this for the cats own protection.  Personally, I would rather be free than to live in jail, no matter that living free exposes me to others that carry disease and exposes me to the possibility of car accidents and such and give my cats the same consideration, but I do not live in a dense city.

It is not just about law, we are talking ethical

- Is it ethical to knowingly trap your neighbors pet cat, even if allowed under law ?

- Is it realy worse to have a house cat in your garden or walk on your car than a racoon ?  You guys dont have racoons ?  We had them even in the city, especially in downtown San Jose.  Should walking on your car be some kind of death or imprisonment sentence for another creature ?

I have copious amounts of wildlife that roams through and around my back yard. I don't have the same problem with them that I do with the neighborhood cats. And yes I see that each animal is unique (a cat is not a dog) but the ordinance says that animals includes chickens. People don't leash chickens but they make sure they don't roam in my neighbors yard.  I don't understand why you have such a hard time with this. You just want to let you cat roam because that's what you've been doing for years. But it's wrong and now you have to stop. The law is ethical. Letting you cat wander and contract feline leukemia is not ethical. and it's also not legal to allow it to wander once it contracts feline leukemia. And no people do not have the right to allow their cat to wander the neighborhood as they please. 

Offline Mr. Bill

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Re: Getting Rid of Stray Cats... Ethically
« Reply #49 on: October 26, 2018, 11:25:33 AM »
what state and county ?

This topic is viewable by the entire world without even being a forum member.  Most people do not want to share the locations of their homes.

Offline Docwatmo

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Re: Getting Rid of Stray Cats... Ethically
« Reply #50 on: October 26, 2018, 11:27:40 AM »

- Is it ethical to knowingly trap your neighbors pet cat, even if allowed under law ?


Yes it is.  Particularly if you've warned your neighbor multiple times, and have been through the 2 minimum trap and notify procedures. (After a dozen or more warnings and reminders of the ordinance)  Cat, Dog, Ferret, Rabbit, they are all the same.  They are pets and if not maintained and controlled by their owner, they are nuisance animals.      It's not something I would want to do, but if their cat is being a nuisance animal and they have been warned several times, and their cat has been trapped several times and they still don't make any effort to maintain their pet on their own property, then I have no problem with it.  I've been fortunate to never have to do it.  But I have a neighbor 3 houses down who's next door neighbor fed a bunch of stray cats and called them "Her pets" and he ended up trapping 7 of them and turning them over to animal control before the police finally made a visit to her house and she stopped feeding the strays.    That was about 8 years ago and we have only seen 2 strays since then and neither stayed in the area long. 

Is it ethical to have a pet and not maintain control of it?  Is it ethical to allow your pet to defecate in your neighbors yard?  Is it ethical to feed strays causing them to hang out and become nuisance animals?   


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Offline scoop

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Re: Getting Rid of Stray Cats... Ethically
« Reply #52 on: October 29, 2018, 09:40:44 AM »

Offline Docwatmo

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Re: Getting Rid of Stray Cats... Ethically
« Reply #53 on: October 30, 2018, 06:55:45 AM »
Just to assure anyone seeing the video.  The video is fake.  No cats were harmed in the filming.