Author Topic: Dealing with COVID-19 Overload  (Read 1222 times)

Offline fritz_monroe

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Dealing with COVID-19 Overload
« on: March 22, 2020, 09:17:18 AM »
For the most part, I'm a "glass half full" sort of person.  I don't get wound up over potential emergencies.

My wife is not this way.  By default, she looks for the worst possible outcome to any situation.

With the COVID-19 pandemic, there's so much information instantly available.  My wife is constantly watching the news, looking online for the latest numbers of cases in our state and worrying about coming into contact with infected people.

I'm constantly trying to down play the situation, but it's getting pretty tiring on my part.

Cutting off new information will just make her mind go racing on the horrible possibilities.

What are you guys doing to try to talk the stressing family members down off the ledge when it comes to the current pandemic?

Offline LvsChant

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Re: Dealing with COVID-19 Overload
« Reply #1 on: March 22, 2020, 09:34:55 AM »
Well... since we are pretty well prepared and also pretty much self-isolating, we don't think we are in any real danger in the short-run. I'm guessing it is the same for you and your family.

Maybe you could inspire her to be a positive influence and means of moral support for her friends who maybe don't know as much about what to do? If she would look for the upsides to the news (possible new treatments, conversion of US manufacturing to make PPE equipment for our healthcare workers, the fact that spring is on the way and plenty of opportunities to grow excess food to share with neighbors, etc.) maybe she would see her own power to influence her friends in a more positive way, rather than being fed by their negativity and fear.

Maybe she could spend her time trying to find ways around shortages and sharing these ideas with her friends... thinking of ways to help her neighbors, etc. to reduce this problem. For example, websites that are direct shipping free of charge for household needs (Walgreens, et al.).

Is there some need in your local area that she could safely help with? Maybe your church needs people to make phone calls to the homebound or elderly to see how they are doing... Maybe she has knowledge on the particulars of gardening in your region, plus extra seed to share? Those things could be managed without contact with her friends and chat group. Even seed sharing could be managed through the mail, etc.

Maybe if she focuses her energy in positive ways, it will distract her from the negative...

I have become a bit weary of the silliness of some of my online FB friends -- even some who have been good friends for years... encourage her to "snooze" them for awhile to keep the annoyance out of her feeds. I find that makes my day a little brighter and less irritating.

Sorry, Fritz... in the meantime, of course, we are here for you, too!!!

Offline Chemsoldier

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Re: Dealing with COVID-19 Overload
« Reply #2 on: March 22, 2020, 09:45:22 AM »
I ask them what decisions they need to make. Do you have enough information to make that decision?  Will more information help you make a better decision?  Even if yes...how much better a decision for what investment of time, effort, and upset?

Do you consider COVID-19 a threat?  Do you act the way you should to discourage transmission of the virus?  Do you live in a prepared house? 

The other tact I take is that the virus operates at its own pace.  We are used to being able to increase the velocity of understanding through looking harder...by reading more reports, articles, etc.  Look, this thing isnt visible without testing, and it will not incubate any f***ing faster just because we want to know if measures are working.  A person's worry cannot be harnessed to helpful expediting of this crisis.  It is a real slow motion train wreck.  If we implement the best measures to mitigate it, we get to watch things get worse for at least two weeks before we see ANY improvement.  It will throw us a weird signal, we will do the right thing and continue to watch stuff get worse.  We are used to instant feedback in the information economy.

I am taking a break from the internet news today.  I made my fresh veg run to the store this morning and picked up a Wall Street Journal.  That is my news today.  The internet will be waiting for me tomorrow.  I am set enough I dont need to go out again for a while.  I dont need the latest intel on who has dishsoap in stock or whether an intersection that I aint traveling though is closed.

I think Colorado will go to shelter in place at some point, or at least the front range will, but we are set here at the house for a month or more...much more if we go really spartan.  I feel for those who are not set and have to keep venturing out.  Maybe reduce the signal as much as possible.  Stop following national and internation news as close.  Listen to local radio and TV as much as possible.  You might need to cut out panicky friends if you find they are disrupting your calm. 

I have a relation who is a worry wart but is really into guns.  I planned my conversation talking points ahead of time to have things that would interest him that steered him off of the crisis.

Offline Mr. Bill

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Re: Dealing with COVID-19 Overload
« Reply #3 on: March 23, 2020, 06:09:21 PM »
Mike Pence is not a person I normally listen to for wisdom, but this was a pretty good statement he made last Friday: "Do not be afraid, be vigilant.  All the experts tell us that the risk of serious illness to the average American for the coronavirus is low, but we need every American to put into practice the president’s coronavirus guidelines."

It's really hard to find balance.  I don't care how good a prepper you are, you are probably not completely prepared for this.  I know I'm not.

On the one hand, this is a simple adversary.  With mere soap and social distancing, we can hold it back while treatments and vaccines are developed.

On the other hand, we need MOST of us doing soap and social distancing, and a large fraction of the population doesn't believe, or doesn't care.

On the other other hand, we all have things to do that we believe are important.  Peole have to earn money, they have to buy food.  Heck, my wife and I are closing on the purchase of a new house in 8 days.  Was that brilliant timing, or what?  So we're doing everything we can via Internet, and we'll probably do some of the moving ourselves, but eventually we've gotta hire strong people with a truck.  Is that an essential service?  Are we taking excessive risks, or putting them at risk?  The news changes every day, so how can you plan?

It's a difficult and confusing time.

But overloading on pandemic news is harmful.  Gotta trim it down somehow.  Go for the most "sciency" sources, avoid the panic-mongers.  Not easy.

Offline fritz_monroe

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Re: Dealing with COVID-19 Overload
« Reply #4 on: March 23, 2020, 07:47:55 PM »
Thanks guys.  I just keep trying to "talk her down" when she gets all spun up.

The benefit of this is that I'm going to use this to get more prepared after it's over.  She always just accepted the prepping I was doing as it's a weird thing that Fritz is going to do.  She never really got it that there would be a reason to prep.  Now she's getting it and it won't be as much of a challenge in the future.

Offline Morning Sunshine

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Re: Dealing with COVID-19 Overload
« Reply #5 on: March 23, 2020, 08:08:15 PM »
Thanks guys.  I just keep trying to "talk her down" when she gets all spun up.

The benefit of this is that I'm going to use this to get more prepared after it's over.  She always just accepted the prepping I was doing as it's a weird thing that Fritz is going to do.  She never really got it that there would be a reason to prep.  Now she's getting it and it won't be as much of a challenge in the future.

silver lining...

Offline Packerfan78

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Re: Dealing with COVID-19 Overload
« Reply #6 on: March 24, 2020, 12:42:42 AM »
I got a chest cold in the middle of this and it was the best thing. The doctors are myopic and tested me for the flu and assumed I had the covid. They tested me and it took 3 days to get a result. Where I was isolated didn’t have internet or tv so I was cut off. I tested negative and at the end everybody wanted to give me an update. Nothing has changed, wash your hands, stay out of big groups etc.

Offline Stwood

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Re: Dealing with COVID-19 Overload
« Reply #7 on: March 24, 2020, 08:26:15 AM »
Wife and I are both taking this about the same. Hanging back and listening/watching, not getting hysterical.
Retired to our farm, we don't have to travel. Did the last supply run last week and are prepped for a long time. This run will tell us what we will need for the next coming run, or what we lack now.
We've never had anything like this since we've been preparing. I think we're in good shape.

Offline LvsChant

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Re: Dealing with COVID-19 Overload
« Reply #8 on: March 24, 2020, 08:33:39 AM »
I think there will be quite a few silver linings after this is all done...

The general population typically likes to deride what preppers do as crazy... probably it will be less so after this. And, there may be many more who see the good sense in stocking up their homes for unexpected things afterwards, too. That helps us all.

And... in the long run, we'll probably see a big return of manufacturing jobs to our own country vs. China, which will lessen our dependence on them for the future and provide good work for more of our own citizens. Also, I think the use of private companies to step up to the need for testing and provision of PPE supplies may lead to a long-term reduction in needless regulations on silly things. (Like, why did many big companies have all their masks produced in other countries due to the regulations  restricting them from being able to produce them and meet requirements here? I truly do not understand this at. all.)

Finally... (and I realize there may be opposing opinions on this), it will show the need for good border control.

Offline suzysurvivor

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Re: Dealing with COVID-19 Overload
« Reply #9 on: March 24, 2020, 09:23:48 AM »

Maybe she could spend her time trying to find ways around shortages and sharing these ideas with her friends... thinking of ways to help her neighbors, etc. to reduce this problem. For example, websites that are direct shipping free of charge for household needs (Walgreens, et al.).
Maybe if she focuses her energy in positive ways, it will distract her from the negative...

maybe she's done all that but is overwhelmed with anger and frustration by the stupidity of the sheeple still going to the beach, still going craft shopping (coz you know...it's a pandemic..Karen NEEDS her glitter).  Maybe she's doing ALL she can to keep herself and her family well and safe but some of her family works in healthcare and they HAVE to go out and face this every day.

Oh, wait.  That's me.  Sorry.

Offline LvsChant

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Re: Dealing with COVID-19 Overload
« Reply #10 on: March 24, 2020, 10:29:49 AM »
truly... It is frustrating!

Offline David in MN

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Re: Dealing with COVID-19 Overload
« Reply #11 on: March 24, 2020, 01:12:13 PM »
First, turn off the news. They don't have any better idea than rank speculation anyway. Not helpful..

Second, have an introspective moment. We're all being treated like we are geriatrics with lung diseases. Take a deep breath and realize you're not even in the at risk community and many who are (like my parents) are struggling to correctly assess their exposure.

We're doing daily phone calls around the family and it has been really nice just to connect and commisserate with loved ones.

And for all the poo-pooing of young people still going to beaches it's a really good sign. There's that magical time between 17 and 24 where you learn you can just live on drugs and sex and various other risky behaviors. They don't feel like this disease has added much risk to their normal risky behavior. Maybe that's good to see. I remember being 19 and I was pretty reckless.

And take the long view. You're not a Marine in Khe Sanh or stuck in the trenches of 1916 France. Compare to my great grandfather who served at the Marne only to send his 2 sons (one a paratrooper and one a beachhead) and only have one come back we're in pretty easy going times. This won't even rank on the order of real disasters. It's not the Holocaust, it's not Pol Pot's killing fields, it's not even the Spanish flu. Sometimes it sucks but you just have to keep putting one foot in front of the other. And take solace. We beat the Nazis. Not easy, not fun. But we did it. And then came home and raised families.

Offline Mr. Bill

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Re: Dealing with COVID-19 Overload
« Reply #12 on: March 24, 2020, 04:51:20 PM »
David, I agree with you that we need to calm down a bit.  But a lot of what you wrote above is way too calm.

We (well, our ancestors) defeated the Nazis by doing difficult stuff and generally sharing the belief that it was absolutely necessary to do so.

In contrast, there's a widespread (thankfully not universal) feeling that COVID-19 is not that big a deal, that a cure is nearly at hand, and that all these government-imposed restrictions and recommendations are unnecessary overreach designed to be evaded.

That magical time for 17-24 year olds means they're risking, most likely, getting a nasty flu-like illness -- and then taking it home to their families and spreading it to their friends and everyone they meet at college or the bar or the gym or the beach.  It's not risking only their own health.

This is not how we defeated the Nazis.

And yes, it is entirely possible that the death count could exceed the Holocaust or the Spanish Flu if we keep on like that.

Gotta get some balance, but that is the wrong balance.

Offline LvsChant

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Re: Dealing with COVID-19 Overload
« Reply #13 on: March 24, 2020, 06:10:15 PM »
Agreed, Mr. Bill. I was a bit distressed to see the interview with Pres. Trump in which he seems to be moving between keeping the shutdown going to save lives and letting things rip in favor of the economy. He was definitely quoting the relatively low death rate of this virus compared to the Spanish flu, etc. I think it is perhaps wishful thinking that it may not be as bad as predicted on his part, but it seems very dangerous to me. That relatively low death rate will only be achievable as things develop if the healthcare system can keep up, so I don't have high hopes of that once things speed up in terms of the spread.

I did also see a report that seems to show that the most significant factor among those who have the most serious cases seems to be those who are overweight, obese, or morbidly obese. If I understood the report, it seems to be more important than any other factor, in general. It doesn't explain many of the serious cases we hear of (as in Italy whose first serious case was a 30-something man who was also a marathon runner), but in general terms it does seem that unhealthy weight must be a big factor.

Offline IKN

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Re: Dealing with COVID-19 Overload
« Reply #14 on: March 24, 2020, 08:42:59 PM »
I guess I have a different point of view about it.
Consider this, if we were to stay shutdown and isolated to keep the spread at bay, it will probably slow the spread. I don’t think it will stop it unless there’s a complete lockdown that everyone obeys.
This would result in the following:
Worldwide economic collapse, reduced or loss of planting season, loss of production of PPE and potential treatments/cure, & possibly war.
When you add all the civil unrest and violence, large potential for war, along with a few other factors, the death toll would be much larger than what it would appear just letting the virus run it coarse.
Here in Illinois (one of the first States to report confirmed cases), schools and businesses were shut down fairly early along with a stay at home quarantine. We’re mostly a rural state with Chicago being the only really big major city, yet the confirmed case numbers are climbing exponentially.

I’m not saying which way would be a better way to go. If the chloroquine treatment shows promise, it would change the equation drastically, but other than that, it’s a crapshoot to which idea would be best at this point IMHO.

Offline suzysurvivor

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Re: Dealing with COVID-19 Overload
« Reply #15 on: March 25, 2020, 02:24:42 PM »
it became clear today that i have to back off.  I'm pretty sure i had a TIA or a 'mini-stroke' kinda thing.   

on the bright side, i did find out that the 'brain zaps' i've been having for a while aren't a big deal.

Offline Mr. Bill

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Re: Dealing with COVID-19 Overload
« Reply #16 on: April 01, 2020, 04:45:55 PM »
"Also?  I can kill you with my brain."


https://www.xkcd.com/2287/

Offline surfivor

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Re: Dealing with COVID-19 Overload
« Reply #17 on: April 01, 2020, 06:14:55 PM »
Agreed, Mr. Bill. I was a bit distressed to see the interview with Pres. Trump in which he seems to be moving between keeping the shutdown going to save lives and letting things rip in favor of the economy. He was definitely quoting the relatively low death rate of this virus compared to the Spanish flu, etc. I think it is perhaps wishful thinking that it may not be as bad as predicted on his part, but it seems very dangerous to me. That relatively low death rate will only be achievable as things develop if the healthcare system can keep up, so I don't have high hopes of that once things speed up in terms of the spread.

I did also see a report that seems to show that the most significant factor among those who have the most serious cases seems to be those who are overweight, obese, or morbidly obese. If I understood the report, it seems to be more important than any other factor, in general. It doesn't explain many of the serious cases we hear of (as in Italy whose first serious case was a 30-something man who was also a marathon runner), but in general terms it does seem that unhealthy weight must be a big factor.

 Because of a long term virus lockdown, the economy could also be destroyed by a great depression like event leading to extreme poverty, homelessness, authoritarianism, cashless society, and early death from malnutrition, death because of societal breakdown and lawlessness etc.  That is also a possible risk and perhaps just as dangerous as the virus or even more likely you sometimes have to wonder. Many people are more worried about the government response. I think I heard that the Federal Reserve bank is at it again bailing out foreign banks. They did this after the 2008 crash

Some humanitarian groups also consider solitary confinement to be a form of torture. I am not saying I agree with that, but it is something to think about. This may be true because in theory it seems there is no limit on how far someone could be forced to be quarantined by having them self locked up in a house - A possible alternative argument. Even though the current time is 14 days. I see no guarantee that living in isolation for much longer might not occur

Quote
Solitary confinement is considered to be a form of psychological torture with measurable long-term physiological effects when the period of confinement is longer than a few weeks or is continued indefinitely. ... The United Nations have also banned the use of solitary confinement for longer than 15 days.


You could also argue that the need to be out in nature in the woods is a kind of religious practice and being forced to stay home would violate your religious principles and especially if the risk given seems exaggerated from what you believe it to be or what it actually seems. Suppose that they would want you to stay in your town for a year and never go to the beach, never visit the mountains or your camp in another state.

Who's to say what is an acceptable risk or what to do about it ? 1/2 million people can die every year from the seasonal flu. Maybe someone might decide people with the regular flu should be quarantined. At one time measles was tolerated as a typical disease that kids got, then they seemed to start to treat it more like it was a big emergency. 

At any rate, I believe avoid too much news. Have some days when you do other things besides watch TV. Dale Carnigie has a great book on anxiety and worry. Watch the TV for awhile and then shut it off. Go for a walk in the woods, join an online group, read a book etc. I was at an online men's Christian group

 If someone is always worried, what you can do is to make a list of all the things you are worried about. What if this, what if that etc. This actually helps because everything you are worried about is on a piece of paper and not going around and round in your head

 You can think of what is the worst thing that could happen and then what would you do if that happens. Try to accept that this or that could happen or access what is the likelihood of that event happening
« Last Edit: April 01, 2020, 06:36:42 PM by surfivor »

Offline fritz_monroe

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Re: Dealing with COVID-19 Overload
« Reply #18 on: April 02, 2020, 09:40:28 AM »
"Also?  I can kill you with my brain."

I LOVE Firefly

Offline Morning Sunshine

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Re: Dealing with COVID-19 Overload
« Reply #19 on: April 02, 2020, 10:55:24 AM »
"Also?  I can kill you with my brain."
I LOVE Firefly

indeed.  I love that line!

Online iam4liberty

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Re: Dealing with COVID-19 Overload
« Reply #20 on: April 02, 2020, 11:56:21 AM »

Offline theBINKYhunter

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Re: Dealing with COVID-19 Overload
« Reply #21 on: April 06, 2020, 07:19:08 AM »
I'm in a similar position to fritz. My wife is an RN who's been staying home the last couple years to be with the kids because she finally had the opportunity to do so. She started working again in January and then this happens. She's been following news from 'boots on the ground' sources in nursing forums and what she's reading is truly appalling, but I also think she's overloading because she'll be reading it multiple times a day. We're both in agreement that this is being sensationalized because only the bad stuff is being focused on in the media but as Bill said, we still need to do what's necessary so we can not get ourselves sick or get others.

Corona cases are now popping up in multiple care homes in our area and that's where her patients are. She came to the decision that she is not willing to take the risk of walking into a hotbed of the virus and bringing it home. I listened to the call she had with her manager of two weeks and they were both in tears. My wife because she likes the job but feels it's too dangerous right now and her manager because she understands and feels bad that she can't acquire basic PPE for her staff and she knows they're all in between a rock and a hard place.

Offline LvsChant

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Re: Dealing with COVID-19 Overload
« Reply #22 on: April 06, 2020, 10:31:02 AM »
I'm in a similar position to fritz. My wife is an RN who's been staying home the last couple years to be with the kids because she finally had the opportunity to do so. She started working again in January and then this happens. She's been following news from 'boots on the ground' sources in nursing forums and what she's reading is truly appalling, but I also think she's overloading because she'll be reading it multiple times a day. We're both in agreement that this is being sensationalized because only the bad stuff is being focused on in the media but as Bill said, we still need to do what's necessary so we can not get ourselves sick or get others.

Corona cases are now popping up in multiple care homes in our area and that's where her patients are. She came to the decision that she is not willing to take the risk of walking into a hotbed of the virus and bringing it home. I listened to the call she had with her manager of two weeks and they were both in tears. My wife because she likes the job but feels it's too dangerous right now and her manager because she understands and feels bad that she can't acquire basic PPE for her staff and she knows they're all in between a rock and a hard place.

wow! That must be heart-breaking for her... I cannot imagine be stuck with that type of decision... without proper PPE, it is just an untenable working situation.

Offline David in MN

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Re: Dealing with COVID-19 Overload
« Reply #23 on: April 07, 2020, 07:25:48 AM »
I had a case of N95 masks because I do woodworking and I have this silly "buy in bulk" mentality that I'm sure pervades around here. I donated them to the local hospital. If push comes to shove I have a 3M cartridge respirator that actually works better for particulate sawdust stuff (though I think not as well for virus stuff) but to not step up and support our medical personnel who are quite literally our front line troops in an era of contagion seems as wrong as not supporting my local soldiers deployed to combat zones.

Offline theBINKYhunter

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Re: Dealing with COVID-19 Overload
« Reply #24 on: April 07, 2020, 07:49:07 AM »
...our medical personnel who are quite literally our front line troops ...

This is not meant to sound like an ass so please keep that in mind with what I'm about to say:

Stop comparing civilian medical personnel to soldiers. These are not combat troops. These are not people who signed up to go to war to save lives. They are people who decided to do a job for whatever reason and no where at any time did the majority (I'll not say most because I can't prove it) of them think 'I'm going to sacrifice my life today'.

New York is throwing out the idea of a medical draft: https://www1.nyc.gov/office-of-the-mayor/news/218-20/mayor-de-blasio-calls-draft-essential-medical-personnel

Want to guess how good that's going to go over? Not well. Nurses and Doctors are already pissed because of how unprepared the hospitals and administration were for this. Just go over to r/nursing on reddit and read some of the horror stories of what's going on: https://www.reddit.com/r/nursing/

I'm not saying this to be a jerk: nurses are not heroes right now. They're people who were put into a terrible situation and their employers, who had a responsibility to protect them with proper PPE, have utterly failed. I don't know what the aftermath of this is going to look like but I hope it's not pretty for a lot of hospitals and administration (to be clear I'm talking about being held responsible, not physical harm/witch hunting). If you really want to make the military comparison do it right and compare them to conscripted troops, but ones who have a terrible choices (paycheck and potential loss of life, or quit and be out a job?)

I get the sentiment, but it's wrong. They're not troops, plain and simple. I fear that continually comparing them to combat medics will skew the perception of our medical staff and place them in a box that they don't belong in and set future expectations that should not be there.

Offline Morning Sunshine

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Re: Dealing with COVID-19 Overload
« Reply #25 on: April 07, 2020, 07:59:27 AM »
New York is throwing out the idea of a medical draft: https://www1.nyc.gov/office-of-the-mayor/news/218-20/mayor-de-blasio-calls-draft-essential-medical-personnel

Want to guess how good that's going to go over? Not well. Nurses and Doctors are already pissed because of how unprepared the hospitals and administration were for this. Just go over to r/nursing on reddit and read some of the horror stories of what's going on: https://www.reddit.com/r/nursing/

oh wow.  First thought: for a bunch of people worried that Trump is going to go full-dictator, they sure seem to get there first....

also, I would NOT want an unwilling doctor/nurse helping me anywhere or anytime... especially in a life/death situation.  My kids pediatrician when they were very young was great; loved him.  His receptionist - not even his nurse or PA or anything - his RECEPTIONIST always looked and acted like she hated being there, hated kids, hated dealing with parents, and had a sneer on her lips that looked like she smelled something nasty.  It made me not want to go there.  I cannot imagine a doctor or a nurse with that attitude.

Offline David in MN

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Re: Dealing with COVID-19 Overload
« Reply #26 on: April 07, 2020, 08:01:07 AM »
This is not meant to sound like an ass so please keep that in mind with what I'm about to say:

Stop comparing civilian medical personnel to soldiers. These are not combat troops. These are not people who signed up to go to war to save lives. They are people who decided to do a job for whatever reason and no where at any time did the majority (I'll not say most because I can't prove it) of them think 'I'm going to sacrifice my life today'.

New York is throwing out the idea of a medical draft: https://www1.nyc.gov/office-of-the-mayor/news/218-20/mayor-de-blasio-calls-draft-essential-medical-personnel

Want to guess how good that's going to go over? Not well. Nurses and Doctors are already pissed because of how unprepared the hospitals and administration were for this. Just go over to r/nursing on reddit and read some of the horror stories of what's going on: https://www.reddit.com/r/nursing/

I'm not saying this to be a jerk: nurses are not heroes right now. They're people who were put into a terrible situation and their employers, who had a responsibility to protect them with proper PPE, have utterly failed. I don't know what the aftermath of this is going to look like but I hope it's not pretty for a lot of hospitals and administration (to be clear I'm talking about being held responsible, not physical harm/witch hunting). If you really want to make the military comparison do it right and compare them to conscripted troops, but ones who have a terrible choices (paycheck and potential loss of life, or quit and be out a job?)

I get the sentiment, but it's wrong. They're not troops, plain and simple. I fear that continually comparing them to combat medics will skew the perception of our medical staff and place them in a box that they don't belong in and set future expectations that should not be there.

Makes sense to me. I don't think you're off base. It's a metaphor and all metaphors suffer imperfection. I think it just helps people like me to rewire the brain that we need to do what we can to support our medical infrastructure the same way we support our combat vets. It's a little harder because I can't organize a charity shooting event or do a baked goods raffle in these times but it doesn't hurt for those of us who can to take a minute and ask what we can do to lend a hand. And for those of us who have family in the medical field this has the same feel as watching our family members deploy to combat. I've done both so the language is often blurry.

Offline LvsChant

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Re: Dealing with COVID-19 Overload
« Reply #27 on: April 07, 2020, 07:17:56 PM »
Agreed, Binky.

I can't really get my head around why it took so long for the healthcare folks to see that this was serious. In the time between when Wuhan shut down and now, there should have been some way to beg, borrow, steal, ...get the MyPillow guy up and running to get PPE for the staff. Wouldn't you think???

I will say, based on my experience with family members in the healthcare profession, they were completely unimpressed when I broached the subject and thought I was a bit tin-foil-hattish to be worrying about this virus (It's just like the flu -- don't get your panties in a twist!). The realization that this was a different thing came WAAAAY late for them. What was it? Arrogance? The idea that a non-health professional could know something that they didn't just didn't compute? Has anyone else experienced this?

I mean: I was sounding the alarm with my family at the end of January... maybe it was just too soon?


Offline Stwood

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Re: Dealing with COVID-19 Overload
« Reply #28 on: April 07, 2020, 07:29:43 PM »
Agreed, Binky.

I can't really get my head around why it took so long for the healthcare folks to see that this was serious. In the time between when Wuhan shut down and now, there should have been some way to beg, borrow, steal, ...get the MyPillow guy up and running to get PPE for the staff. Wouldn't you think???

I will say, based on my experience with family members in the healthcare profession, they were completely unimpressed when I broached the subject and thought I was a bit tin-foil-hattish to be worrying about this virus (It's just like the flu -- don't get your panties in a twist!). The realization that this was a different thing came WAAAAY late for them. What was it? Arrogance? The idea that a non-health professional could know something that they didn't just didn't compute? Has anyone else experienced this?

I mean: I was sounding the alarm with my family at the end of January... maybe it was just too soon?

Depending on what it is, and what business, some that are in the business always tend to look down their nose at people that are not *in* the business.
Healthcare
Bridge builders
Etc
Etc

Offline theBINKYhunter

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Re: Dealing with COVID-19 Overload
« Reply #29 on: April 08, 2020, 07:57:09 AM »
Not sure why they turned their nose up at you. I should have paid closer attention and admittedly didn't. I've commented in another thread that our preps for a viral, air born contagion are non existent in my home. I can plug a gunshot would with my preps but I can't give you a mask. This has revealed a gaping hole in my preps. That being said for those that really took this seriously early on, I applaud you. I hope it never happens again but if it does I hope that I'm in the group that saw it coming and was ready.

I agree with Stwood and liken it to Jack's 'powdered butt' syndrome that parents have towards their kids. You'll never be taken seriously because they 'know more than you'.