Author Topic: Squirrel Stew - Yum!  (Read 17740 times)

Offline ModernSurvival

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Re: Squirrel Stew - Yum!
« Reply #30 on: February 05, 2009, 06:15:12 AM »
A shot gun or a 22 and simply sit in places where squirrels are.  Still hunting is good to but start out with some sitting.  They move mostly a few hours after sun up and a few hours before sundown.  One of the easiest animals to hunt honestly, just get out and do it and you start to figure things out. 

One more if a squirrel is up a tree hiding on you and you can't get a shot, toss your hat on the other side of the tree and be ready for a quick shot.

Offline Roswell

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Re: Squirrel Stew - Yum!
« Reply #31 on: February 05, 2009, 01:59:49 PM »
A shot gun or a 22 and simply sit in places where squirrels are.  Still hunting is good to but start out with some sitting.  They move mostly a few hours after sun up and a few hours before sundown.  One of the easiest animals to hunt honestly, just get out and do it and you start to figure things out. 

One more if a squirrel is up a tree hiding on you and you can't get a shot, toss your hat on the other side of the tree and be ready for a quick shot.

Thanks!  I could see how that could work with the hat.

Offline CFG

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Re: Squirrel Stew - Yum!
« Reply #32 on: February 11, 2009, 10:14:29 PM »
Thanks for clarification b/t fox and red.  Our fox squirrels here are red, I checked and they can be black or golden as well, it appears.


Offline DeltaEchoVictor

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Re: Squirrel Stew - Yum!
« Reply #33 on: February 14, 2009, 07:50:37 PM »
any other tips on hunting squirrels?  that recipe looks tasty

Here's what I've learned about squirrels & squirrel hunting.  I've been hunting squirrels longer than I've been hunting anything else, it's the first thing I ever hunted with my Dad.

1.  You'll see more squirrels while deer hunting than just about anything else.  You'll see more squirrels because you'll be carrying a large caliber rifle (usually) or a slug gun.  Both of which turn squirrels into gooey mush, thus you'll be less likely to shoot them....bastards, they just know when they're safe.

2.  Squirrels sound like monsters when you're a little kid & your Dad leaves you sitting against a tree & wanders off into the dark woods to find his own tree to lean against.  (Turkeys, deer, chipmunks, birds & just about everything else also sounds like monsters when you're a kid.)

3.  When you miss a squirrel that should have been an easy, close shot, even the squirrel thinks you're a poor shot.  Seriously, look at the look on his face the next time you miss one, you'll recognize it.  It's the same one your wife/girlfriend gives you when you do something stupid.

4.  Squirrels are loud when down on the ground scavenging (see #2).  One squirrel sounds like a dozen, a dozen squirrels sound like bigfoot...especially if their frolicking about happily just before the evil hunter opens fire on them.  Not that I've ever done that mind you....

5.  A Marlin .30-30 really will turn a squirrel into goo...bastard, that'll teach 'em.  (or so I've been told)

6.  Red Ozark squirrels are larger, dumber & slower moving than the ghosty little gray bastards that are only seen out of the corner of your eye.  Therefore, the Reds are more filling than the grays.

7.  Gray squirrels will run up the tree on your side, then just as you're about to shoot them they'll run around the trunk & ridicule you from the other side, for not being a quick enough shot.  Bastards...

8.  If you shoot at a gray squirrel with all 27 of your newly built wooden arrows, he'll dutifully wait for you to collect the 15 you can find before starting the whole cycle over again.  The sequence goes something like this...chase, shoot, get ridiculed from the back side of the tree...repeat until out of arrows...Find arrows & repeat until completely out of arrows....again.

7.  When you finally do shoot a gray squirrel you'll holler triumphantly, pretty much scaring everything in the woods into hiding.

Now for the serious stuff.

If it's your first time hunting squirrels take a shotgun if you have one.  It shortens the learning curve & it allows you to shoot into the thick tree tops to kill the squirrel where it likes to hide. 

The best time to hunt them is usually early in the morning.  Be in the woods at your spot before daylight.  You'll start hearing them on the ground about the time the sun starts coming up.  They really do sound like monsters when they're digging thru the leaves looking for nuts. 

If they're on the ground & not preoccupied looking for food, they'll be traveling quickly.  They typically like to travel along deadfall & don't spend a lot of time on the ground when not scavenging.  Use your peripheral vision as well as your primary vision, don't spend too much time looking in one place unless you know there is a squirrel where you're looking.

If you saw a squirrel head up a tree & you didn't see him leave the tree, but you can't see him, he's still in that tree, he's just a lot more patient than you are & better camouflaged too.  Be patient, get comfortable & be ready to shoot the second you see him again.

Animals don't stomp thru the woods, humans do.  Slow down, reset your human clock to "woods" time.  If you want to move thru the woods, do it like an animal would.  Take a couple of steps & stop, listen & look for a while.  Take a few steps & stop, listen & look for a while.  Take a step or two & stop, listen & look for a while.  Be soft, silent (as possible) & careful when walking thru the woods.  You're in the woods, enjoy it.  There's no need to hurry thru them, you'll miss a lot if you do.  Animals spend more time looking & listening than they do traveling, you should do the same.

Gray squirrels like thick stands of timber, especially where there are lots of nut trees.  Look for nut cuttings at the base of trees, these are nuts that look as if they've been chewed or half eaten by something.  You can also hear squirrels when they're cutting the nuts up in a tree.  It sounds somewhat like something hard being chewed or scraped.  It's hard to describe but easy to recognize if you hear it. 

Gray squirrels like to use hollowed trees for dens, these are great to hunt around.  Keep an eye out for old trees that may have trunk damage, been lightening struck or otherwise have structure damage to them that would allow critters to build dens in them.  Tree hollows are the "penthouse suites" of the critter kindgom.  That's about as good as it gets for a critter to build a den in.  Less desirable are the clumps of leaves & twigs often seen in tree tops and referred to as squirrels nests.  They probably are nests but odds are they won't be inhabited because these nests aren't permanent structures.  Never shoot blindly into these nests, it's unethical & if you do hit something, you may not kill it.  You won't be able to retrieve it either, shooting something & not retrieving it is about the worst thing a hunter can do.

Watch the tree tops.  Sit quietly, move very little & be patient while perusing the tops of trees & you'll see lots of life.

It's much easier to see squirrels after the leaves come down.  I love to hunt anytime, but when the leaves come down I usually hunt harder because the odds have increased in my favor.  Gray squirrels hide easily among the leaves.

Red (Fox) squirrels are found mainly in areas with sparse tree populations...I don't know why.  That's what they prefer I assume.  They can often be found in tree lined fence rows, areas without a lot of secondary growth where the tree population consists of large well spaced, older trees.  Our variety here in the Ozarks are typically much larger than our gray squirrels.  They're red, I mean really red colored here.  They aren't as ghosty as our grays & are slower to run away.  I've actually missed reds before & instead of them running away, they'll run toward me to see what all the commotion is about.  Red squirrel populations here are typically lower than the gray squirrel populations.  I probably see 6 or 8 grays to every red I see.

Squirrel hunting is a blast, especially while doing it with an old longbow.  If you've never been squirrel hunting before I urge you to give it a try.  Find someone near you that hunts & tell them you'd like to learn.  If you've got a good friend that hunts and you don't, ask them if you can go along.  It's a great way to burn a day with a friend.  Heck, if you're ever in S. Missouri give me a shout & I'll take you.
 

Offline Roswell

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Re: Squirrel Stew - Yum!
« Reply #34 on: February 16, 2009, 10:44:01 AM »
Thanks so much for the advice DEV.  I am going to try my skills this weekend.  I have only gone dove and deer hunting. Both of which were a long tome ago.  So, I need all the help I can get.  Sadly, though I don't think Georgia has any red squirrels.  I found this link that has a map of their distribution in NA.  http://www.waza.org/virtualzoo/factsheet.php?id=110-002-036-002&view=Rodents%20and%20Hares 

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Re: Squirrel Stew - Yum!
« Reply #35 on: February 24, 2009, 06:20:59 AM »
I've seen a bunch of recipes similar to this:  back in the Great depression it was called brunswick stew( sometimes the meat was rabbit, sometimes Partridge).  A terrific herb to add to it is sweet flag(Acorus canadensis).  The root has a sweet spicy flavor.