Author Topic: The Pandemic Kitchen  (Read 1437 times)

Offline Carver

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The Pandemic Kitchen
« on: April 05, 2020, 01:10:16 PM »
https://www.breitbart.com/politics/2020/04/04/dr-deborah-birx-this-is-not-the-time-to-go-to-the-grocery-store/
I am discovering that the pandemic situation is changing the way we shop, garden, prepare and our menu. We are close to totally depending upon online grocery shopping once a month and dealing with shortages, learning to use stored food and foraging. I might go back to fishing again. We haven't seen radical changes yet, but are preparing for what might be coming.
This YouTube channel has some good ideas, can't use all of them, but it makes one think, re-think the garden.
https://youtu.be/1IK4-3Of-6c
I've also found some articles from the 1990's about stretching the grocery dollar. Not a time to be complacent.

Offline mountainmoma

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Re: The Pandemic Kitchen
« Reply #1 on: April 05, 2020, 01:26:14 PM »
His list of top 10 crops to grow is a good one: kale&chard; potatoes; cabbage; herbs; sweet potatoes; onions&garlic; corn; beans; winter squash; eggs  reminds me of Carol Deepes suggestions. 

If you find any good stretch the grocery budget, let us know

My last nights foray into pandemic kitchen was to serve my stir fry over noodles instead of rice.  I do have some rice, but it is hard to get right now, and some things realy call for it while I like noodles in peanut sauce type dishes. So, I stir fried some hearty vegetables, made a quick peanut sauce, as I still have lots of peanut butter ( peanuts realy, I grind my own) start with equal amounts boiling water and peanut butter, about 2T of each per serving, I made 2 servings to have leftovers for lunch today.  Add soy sauce ( 1 T in my case), a bit of vinegar, garlic ( 1-2 cloves for me) and some cayenne  -  or whatever you have to spice it up. I used spaghetti for the noodles, I measured out 2 2oz servings and broke the noodles into thirds as I dropped into the pot.  I put the stir fried veggies, then noodles, then topped with peanut sauce straight in the 2 bowls, and stirred up.

« Last Edit: April 05, 2020, 01:35:04 PM by mountainmoma »

Offline Carver

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Re: The Pandemic Kitchen
« Reply #2 on: April 05, 2020, 03:13:41 PM »
Of all things crackers are not available. I think they are easy to make, we use them a lot.

Offline Carver

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Re: The Pandemic Kitchen
« Reply #3 on: April 05, 2020, 06:34:02 PM »
From 1996:


Offline ChEng

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Re: The Pandemic Kitchen
« Reply #4 on: April 05, 2020, 07:55:16 PM »
Thanks Carver, some good info. +1

I had a tiny bit of trouble with it. I followed the link, and then tried to enlarge the images with Ctrl-plus, but that only enlarged everything except the images. What finally worked was to right-click the image, click "View Image" and then click inside the image to bring it to full size. The the article was easily readable to my tired old eyes.

Offline PorcupineKate

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Re: The Pandemic Kitchen
« Reply #5 on: April 06, 2020, 08:24:22 AM »
I cook from scratch all the time.  I had to learn to cook from scratch to manage my health problems and it has turned out to be a really good thing. I don't bake at all so I can't help with that.

There are a few little things I do to stretch the food budget and make things a little taster.

Meat

I prefer to buy whole chickens.  It is cheaper per pound and I have all the bones to make bone broth with it.  I make bone broth with all my meat bones and pressure can it or freeze it.  I then use it in soups, stews, pot roast, rice, gravies, and so on. 

Before I started buying meat directly from local farms I used to have the meat department in the supermarket cut up larger roasts and hams for me into smaller meal sized portions.  I also would have then grind London Broil into burger for me when it was on sale for a low cost lean ground beef.

Even living alone I would buy the family pack of  whatever was on sale. When I got home I would divide everything into meal sized portions and double wrap it in plastic wrap.  They would all be put in gallon sized freezer bags.  I had a small chest freezer that they would be stored in. 

Leftovers
All left overs are put away in single serving containers.  That way they can easily be stacked, labeled, and tossed in the freezer if they are not going to be eaten the next day. This way there is always something to eat when I am having a bad symptom flare or lunches for my husband if he isn't working from home.  We use sharpies to label them.  Rubbing alcohol removes the sharpie.  My vision isn't very good so anything in the freeze needs to be labeled.

We have a standardized set of plastic storage containers so it is easy to find the lids and they all fit on one shelf of a lazy Susan corner cabinet.  We also have lots of canning jars for storage.

Spices

I grow as many herbs as I can and dehydrate them for use in the winter. When you cook everything from scratch and don't eat out at restaurants you go through a lot more seasonings than the average household.   

I also buy my spices as whole seeds and grind them as needed.  That way they keep for years and take up less room in my kitchen.  I make my own seasoning mixes to.  It is easy to find seasoning recipes online and so many of the ingredients overlap.  Toasting the seeds in a pan before you grind them enhances the flavor of many spices and is so  worth doing.

Buying bulk spices is way cheaper than a little bottle of ground mixed stuff.  Ethnic markets tend to have better prices than supermarkets.  I tend to buy them online buy the pound and store them in canning jars in my basement.

I use a small coffee grinder for grinding the spices. I have a mortar and pestle but I tend to be lazy and use coffee grinder.

I will pick up extra when a store has a good sale.  Last summer my peppers didn't do very well so when I spotted a great sale on really good looking bell peppers I bought 10 pounds or so of them.  I chopped them up in the Cuisinart and froze them in quart sized bags.  I have been using them in chili and other dishes.  It has been great having the frozen veggies to use now when I shouldn't be out shopping.

I try and store anything in the freezer in a freezer zip top bag so the items in the bag don't pick up orders or freezer burn.  Butter keeps really well frozen and I buy extra on sale and 4 one pound blocks fit nicely in a gallon freezer bag. 

Pick your own fruit farms are popular in my area and can be a great way to get low cost high quality fruit. There is one veggie farm that opens up to pick your own near the end of the season and they charge buy the half bushel.  It is great deal if you can find something like that.  I would get enough to eat fresh, can, freeze ,and dehydrate. 


Offline ChEng

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Re: The Pandemic Kitchen
« Reply #6 on: April 06, 2020, 08:47:50 AM »
Kate,
Lots of good ideas, thanks. (+1)

We also still cook for our large family (we had nine kids, but they have all moved out,) and freeze the left-overs into meal-sized packets. We use a vacuum sealer, and it does a pretty good job of keeping things ready for quick meals. When we have something that sets up like a cake (some firmer casseroles, dinner-type pies, etc.,) we cut it into serving-sized pieces and then freeze it before sealing those pieces. Soups, stews and the like, we just put enough for the two of us into the sealer bag, seal and then freeze.

Offline PorcupineKate

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Re: The Pandemic Kitchen
« Reply #7 on: April 06, 2020, 09:01:08 AM »
Kate,
Lots of good ideas, thanks. (+1)

We also still cook for our large family (we had nine kids, but they have all moved out,) and freeze the left-overs into meal-sized packets. We use a vacuum sealer, and it does a pretty good job of keeping things ready for quick meals. When we have something that sets up like a cake (some firmer casseroles, dinner-type pies, etc.,) we cut it into serving-sized pieces and then freeze it before sealing those pieces. Soups, stews and the like, we just put enough for the two of us into the sealer bag, seal and then freeze.

I have a vacuum sealer but I haven't used it much. I really should work on that.

Offline Carver

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Re: The Pandemic Kitchen
« Reply #8 on: April 06, 2020, 09:51:13 AM »
Kate: excellent tip on leftovers, so many people don't save them, they even throw out a half eaten Thanksgiving turkey!

Offline The Morgan Hill Homesteading Project

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Re: The Pandemic Kitchen
« Reply #9 on: April 06, 2020, 11:38:55 AM »
One thing that I do is I help a couple of vendors unload and reload their trucks at the farmers market. they let me take way I want or they give me a discount.

Offline David in MN

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Re: The Pandemic Kitchen
« Reply #10 on: April 06, 2020, 11:49:45 AM »
Of all things crackers are not available. I think they are easy to make, we use them a lot.

Alton Brown's "seedy crisps". You will not go back.

https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/alton-brown/seedy-crisps-recipe-1943385

Offline mountainmoma

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Re: The Pandemic Kitchen
« Reply #11 on: April 06, 2020, 08:43:39 PM »
I feel better having made a few yummy things today.

This afternoon I finally broke down and made brownies, storage style.  Some of the provident pantry dried eggs, flour, sugar, cocoa powder and red feather canned butter, and I bought extra walnuts on my february store run for treats like this, so with walnuts.  Worked very well.  I am going to freeze the rest in pieces so I can be reasonable and not eat it all at once. 

Dinner tonight was what I was going to have last night, but I forgot how long it takes to make paneer.  SO, I made a half batch of paneer with 2.5 cups of goat milk, not perfect, but I havent made it in years.  I need to add more acid next time to get all the milk solids.  So a simple Indian inspired dish like palak paneer but with kale and beet greens and lots of garlic, some yogurt, garam masala, cayenne, salt and the fried paneer.  Very yummy with homemade naan bread.  I ground flour earlier in the week and made dough and pizza, rest of the dough in the fridge.  So if you take a piece of bread dough and roll it out thin and put it on a cast iron pan, medium hot, put a lid on to keep the steam, you get a good naan/pocket bread.  You have to keep an eye on it and turn it over quick. 

I have oranges on the tree, it is very cold, snowed today even though it melted on the way down, the oranges are sweet now, like the kale.  So I fresh picked an orange to go with peanut butter toast for lunch.

I dont freeze as much as some of you, but I do use the freezer some for leftovers.  I had grated mozarella in there that I used for pizza earlier this week as it takes only 1/2 pound of mozzarella per pizza, and it will get moldy in the fridge to try and save the other half pound, just grate it and freeze it that way.  I also will freeze extra tomato sauce that I might make for pizza or pasta. And, I made a large batch of cream of brocolli with cheese soup, and the other half is in there.  Otherwise, I am trying more to make smaller batches, and I also will make double batches of soups that I can pressure can, and then put those in the pantry.  I do not like to rely on a freezer much.
« Last Edit: April 06, 2020, 08:50:50 PM by mountainmoma »

Offline Carver

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Re: The Pandemic Kitchen
« Reply #12 on: April 06, 2020, 08:50:35 PM »
Alton Brown's "seedy crisps". You will not go back.

https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/alton-brown/seedy-crisps-recipe-1943385
I've just rediscovered Alton and the reason why we are running out of saltines is because of his cracker hack recipe toasting saltines dipped in ghee and hot sauce. So I will have try this one also.
I've also been watching early Emeril Lagasse and never really appreciated how basic and simple his ingredients and techniques are. Chef John is another good one.

Offline David in MN

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Re: The Pandemic Kitchen
« Reply #13 on: April 07, 2020, 05:33:58 AM »
I've just rediscovered Alton and the reason why we are running out of saltines is because of his cracker hack recipe toasting saltines dipped in ghee and hot sauce. So I will have try this one also.
I've also been watching early Emeril Lagasse and never really appreciated how basic and simple his ingredients and techniques are. Chef John is another good one.

Yup. I have about 6 months worth of hummus and homemade crackers. Add any grilled meat with an ethnic (Italian, Mideast, Indian) rub and no complaints by the campfire. Homemade crackers and hummus is like the appetizer at high end restaurants. It can be made at home in minutes from storables.

Offline mountainmoma

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Re: The Pandemic Kitchen
« Reply #14 on: April 08, 2020, 12:12:19 PM »
Yeah, I hear some people are watching the Virus news too much, the worldometer boxes ticking upwards...

Well, me and the other ladies in the family find ourselves frantically checking the Azure website and our Carts in these days winding down to the order cut off, and it is not pretty.... Just more and more "this item is out of stock and unlkely to ship"  every time one of us looks at our respective orders... Then you try and shift to what could be a substitute, but the virtual shelves are looking thin

Yesterday, there was the expensive Bionaturae pasta left, 6 types, today none.  There went the brocolli seedlings... You were willing to buy the expensive bionaturae olive oil ? Ha ! gone. Yeah, every one else noticed that garbanzos were the last legume standing.  Flour ? Not anymore.

We are grateful  that their distribution is still going, they are working so hard with unprecendented ordering as people are not going to brick and mortar stores. 

And, we all do have some food coming.  My personal pantry is better stocked than the young folks.  The one household just received a nice flour grinder ordered by other parent, so they will home grind.  The other household is not too far from me and I will help smooth it out, they both lost out of flour.

It is all about versitility.  If there is not pasta, make it at home we have told them, or keep with the soup and bread.... No burrito size tortillas ? Well, do they have fajita sized or roll in out at home for fajita style ( home made ones never hold up for burritos) 

2 days to load the truck fingers crossed on the cheddar cheese !

Offline ChEng

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Re: The Pandemic Kitchen
« Reply #15 on: April 08, 2020, 12:25:47 PM »
...Well, me and the other ladies in the family find ourselves frantically checking the Azure website ...
Mama, I know of Azure as Microsoft's cloud computing platform. Is your Azure the "Azure, the Standard of Healthy and Abundant Living" (https://www.azurestandard.com/) site?

Offline mountainmoma

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Re: The Pandemic Kitchen
« Reply #16 on: April 08, 2020, 12:31:58 PM »
Mama, I know of Azure as Microsoft's cloud computing platform. Is your Azure the "Azure, the Standard of Healthy and Abundant Living" (https://www.azurestandard.com/) site?

Yes. 

I have been a part of a monthly food order for the past almost 30 years, not Azure until the last recent years, we used to have bulk order co-ops we would form, with different distributers. So, it is part of my lifestyle, and my kids were raised seeing, very little buying in stores and bulk orders of cases or 25 lb bags, and then direct farm purchases, CSA's back when they were CSA's and new, and later farmers markets or our own backyard. 

But, others are now seeing the advantage of ordering from Azure and joining in, straining supplies past breaking, and also regular customers who might have price shopped before are now deciding it is all from Azure

Offline ChEng

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Re: The Pandemic Kitchen
« Reply #17 on: April 08, 2020, 12:37:04 PM »
Mods, if this is in the wrong place, please accept my apology, and move it as needed.

...freeze the left-overs into meal-sized packets. We use a vacuum sealer, and it does a pretty good job of keeping things ready for quick meals. When we have something that sets up like a cake (some firmer casseroles, dinner-type pies, etc.,) we cut it into serving-sized pieces and then freeze it before sealing those pieces. ...
This is one of those cake-like dinners:
Quote from: Hamburger Pie
A girl, named Una, whose father was stationed at Bergstrom AFB at the same time that we were there, gave this recipe to us. Her family went to the same Base Chapel church service that we went to, and she, my wife and I became friends. She gave us this recipe and said that we could modify it with many variations.

We have tried this with many different veggies (basically anything that you would like on pizza would work well.) We have also used pizza/spaghetti sauce in place of the ketchup, and sausage in place of the ground beef and with shredded mozzarella. This also works well using taco meat and shredded cheddar, and having a Mexican-type meal. One more variation that has gone well is to use chili (without beans turned out better than with) in place of the meat and ketchup and some of the veggies - Chili Pie! Experiment, and have yummy fun.

2 boxes of Jiffy Corn Bread
2/3 cups of milk (for the Jiffy mix)
2 large eggs (for the Jiffy mix)
1 Lb ground meat, browned
1 cup of chopped onions
1 cup of chopped bell peppers
1 cup of chopped mushrooms
1 Lb shredded cheese
Ketchup
Salt and pepper to taste

Mix 1 box of Jiffy Corn Bread mix per directions, but use two eggs, rather than the one in the directions. Pour the batter into the bottom of a cake pan. Layer the browned ground meat on the batter, and then add a layer of veggies [onions, peppers, mushrooms, etc.] Spread a layer of ketchup on top of the veggies, and then add a layer of the shredded cheese. Add salt and pepper to taste. Top it off with another box of Jiffy batter, mixed with the two remaining eggs.

Place in oven pre-heated to 350 degree F, and cook for 45 minutes, or until top is golden brown.

This also scales up well; we often use a large lasagna pan, and double the recipe. It turns out well.

Serving suggestion: We cut the pie (like we would a cake) into individual meal-sized pieces and then freeze over night. When thoroughly frozen, take the pieces and vacuum-seal them then return to the freezer. We package them for the two of us; to serve those two-person-sized packs, take out of the freezer, cut a tiny hole for the steam to escape, and microwave on high for about 2 minutes - the vacuum-seal bag will puff up, heating the pie with the steam. Flip up side down, and microwave for another 2 minutes. Experiment and adjust times for whatever size packs you use.

Offline ChEng

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Re: The Pandemic Kitchen
« Reply #18 on: April 08, 2020, 12:39:05 PM »
Yes. 
...
Thanks, it looks interesting, but I think that I'll give it a pass until things lighten up a bit (we aren't hurting right now.) I would hate to be the straw that broke the Azure camel's back.  :D

Offline mountainmoma

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Re: The Pandemic Kitchen
« Reply #19 on: April 08, 2020, 12:42:30 PM »
Yup. I have about 6 months worth of hummus and homemade crackers. Add any grilled meat with an ethnic (Italian, Mideast, Indian) rub and no complaints by the campfire. Homemade crackers and hummus is like the appetizer at high end restaurants. It can be made at home in minutes from storables.

Yes, hummus is an easy last minute bring to a potluck item here as well.  But, I dont do it with crackers, I roll out yeast dough onto a hot cast iron pan with a lid and do fresh pocket bread.  I keep brown sesame seeds in the refridgerator, I do not use the tahini paste, and brown those on a hot pan, then add with fresh garlic, apple cider vinegar, and olive oil in the blender with the garbanzos, salt, pepper and cumin.  I get rave reviews at parties with it, very tasty, fast and inexpensive.  I do usually use canned garbanzos so I can do it last minute.  The other way we eat it is with store bought thick blue corn tortilla chips and carrot sticks, this is what we ate on our road trip to see family out of state at Christmas in the car.  It is also brought to last minute forgotten potlucks or parties that way, throw together the hummus at home, drop by a store on the way for the chips

Offline Morning Sunshine

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Re: The Pandemic Kitchen
« Reply #20 on: April 08, 2020, 03:35:46 PM »
update from the grocery stores in Northern Utah.

I hit Sam's club, the "scratch-and-dent," the health food, and the regular local grocery store. 

Shelves were low, but MOST of the buying limits were gone.  Sam's had TP and water with no limits.  The discount store had bacon for $2/pound (I will be canning the 40# I bought; I had to do that so I can make sure to get 14 oz of MEAT per pint jar); the cashier did not even blink at the amount.  They also had 25# bags of flour, oats, and wheat; pallets of them.  That was limited to 3 bags per variety per customer.
The health food store had suggestions that you do not "stock up" at this time so that everyone who needs something can get it.
The regular grocery store had no limits on anything I could see EXCEPT yeast.  But at least they had yeast.

Oh, and I stopped at the farm store - a different one from last week (I should have gone to the other one but it is far on the other side of town and I just didn't want to; pretty sure they would have had my item).  They had chicks - lots of them and said they had no trouble getting them in.  They did not, however, have my pressure canner gage I need :(

Offline mountainmoma

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Re: The Pandemic Kitchen
« Reply #21 on: April 08, 2020, 05:08:23 PM »
Dont tell my kids, I went into a grocery store today, I was out anyway in the same strip mall, with a mask on, right next to it, so I went in.

I did not walk thru the whole thing, it was a "regular" grocery store Safeway in CA, not a place I usually shop, as I usually bulk buy. 

The did not have any dry legumes of any type.  They had some canned, most types, high prices, from .99(store brand) to 1.99(bush brand) per can.  There were 2 bags of expensive white rice, $7 for a 2 pound bag jasmine white rice, not organic.  There was also maybe one bag of calrose brown rice.  There were canned soups and fruits.  There was no flour of any type.  There was sugar. There was pasta, but I didnt make note of type or prices.   A few other people were there, a small proportion in masks, mostly not, there were not many people in the store, it was early afternoon.  They had arrows on the aisles so all aisles were one way, there were marks on the ground of where to stand in line spaced 6 feet apart.  But, still this system does not work for social isolation for the main reason that the place to stand in line is the aisle behine the register !  SO, if you go down an aisle, which is one way, you may find a person at the other end waiting for a register.  You cannot turn around and you must pass just a foot or 2 apart.  And, when I was there someone going down the aisle recognized their friend standing in line, so he stopped to chat with her, they were about 2 feet apart.  Anyway, I just left. 

Offline Redman

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Re: The Pandemic Kitchen
« Reply #22 on: April 08, 2020, 05:31:37 PM »
  SO, if you go down an aisle, which is one way, you may find a person at the other end waiting for a register.  You cannot turn around and you must pass just a foot or 2 apart.  And, when I was there someone going down the aisle recognized their friend standing in line, so he stopped to chat with her, they were about 2 feet apart.  Anyway, I just left.

Geniuses abound from management to customers. :sarcasm:


Offline Carver

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Re: The Pandemic Kitchen
« Reply #24 on: April 11, 2020, 09:36:09 PM »
Something I've been wanting to do and now I just might do is to cook up some of our dry beans and can them. Never done that before, not sure whether to cook them first and can or put them in dry.

Offline Morning Sunshine

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Re: The Pandemic Kitchen
« Reply #25 on: April 12, 2020, 07:50:45 AM »
Something I've been wanting to do and now I just might do is to cook up some of our dry beans and can them. Never done that before, not sure whether to cook them first and can or put them in dry.

if you do dry - and I have seen someone that does it, in person, I examined her jars - you only put in a tiny amount.  I didn't look too closely as I was wary of the process.

I have done it, and it was nice to have jars of canned beans.  But I never did it again.  Instead I learned how to go from dry to cooked in my crockpot over night.  And that worked for me

Offline LvsChant

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Re: The Pandemic Kitchen
« Reply #26 on: April 13, 2020, 11:08:02 AM »
I have canned dry beans a lot and really like the dry method (learned from Jackie Clay Atkinson). I'm thinking you only put 1/2 cup of dried beans in a pint jar before pressure canning. I'm not where I can access my canning book (where I wrote this instruction down to augment it). This is one of those things I do all the time. Pressure canning will soften up beans even if they have been in storage awhile, and I really like the convenience of having those canned jars of beans ready to dump in a quick batch of chili or bean soup.

For some beans that are older, the soaking method just doesn't ever get the beans nice and soft (at least that has been my experience).

I cannot find the original Jackie Clay article... but here is my recollection:

After sorting and rinsing dry beans, add 1/2 cup (of whatever variety) to a pint jar (1 cup to a quart jar), add salt to your taste (typically 1/2 tsp for pint, 1 tsp for quart). Cover with boiling water, leaving 1 " headspace. Pressure can for 90 minutes (check the pressure and time requirements for your altitude and for pint vs quart times).

Another note: I have added an instant pot to my kitchen appliances and find it very convenient for cooking dried beans, too. Not quite as convenient as dumping jars from the pantry, but still not bad. Since you are pressure cooking the beans with the instant pot, they do get nice and soft, even if they have been stored awhile.

Offline mountainmoma

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Re: The Pandemic Kitchen
« Reply #27 on: April 13, 2020, 11:35:44 AM »
I have canned dry beans a lot and really like the dry method (learned from Jackie Clay Atkinson). I'm thinking you only put 1/2 cup of dried beans in a pint jar before pressure canning. I'm not where I can access my canning book (where I wrote this instruction down to augment it). This is one of those things I do all the time. Pressure canning will soften up beans even if they have been in storage awhile, and I really like the convenience of having those canned jars of beans ready to dump in a quick batch of chili or bean soup.

For some beans that are older, the soaking method just doesn't ever get the beans nice and soft (at least that has been my experience).

I cannot find the original Jackie Clay article... but here is my recollection:

After sorting and rinsing dry beans, add 1/2 cup (of whatever variety) to a pint jar (1 cup to a quart jar), add salt to your taste (typically 1/2 tsp for pint, 1 tsp for quart). Cover with boiling water, leaving 1 " headspace. Pressure can for 90 minutes (check the pressure and time requirements for your altitude and for pint vs quart times).

Another note: I have added an instant pot to my kitchen appliances and find it very convenient for cooking dried beans, too. Not quite as convenient as dumping jars from the pantry, but still not bad. Since you are pressure cooking the beans with the instant pot, they do get nice and soft, even if they have been stored awhile.

Thank you !  I was also wondering about the ratios to do this

Offline Carver

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Re: The Pandemic Kitchen
« Reply #28 on: April 13, 2020, 11:47:55 AM »

Another note: I have added an instant pot to my kitchen appliances and find it very convenient for cooking dried beans, too. Not quite as convenient as dumping jars from the pantry, but still not bad. Since you are pressure cooking the beans with the instant pot, they do get nice and soft, even if they have been stored awhile.

Good point, the I-Pot will do beans in 40 minutes. And dry beans take up less room than jars of cooked beans.

Offline Carver

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Re: The Pandemic Kitchen
« Reply #29 on: April 28, 2020, 09:15:31 PM »
Looks like I might be using the Instant Pot to partial cook whole potatoes and then freeze them if recently purchased go spongy and sprout. Onions are very poor from the store; pickled a small jar that were starting to sprout but will have to consider freezing 5lb bag. Hard to know how scarce these will become. Prepare for the worst.