Author Topic: Food supply chain problems from COVID-19  (Read 2351 times)

Offline Carver

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Re: Food supply chain problems from COVID-19
« Reply #30 on: April 27, 2020, 12:03:44 PM »
Are these stories related?

USDA terminates Chinese-owned Smithfield farm aid contract https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-china-smithfield-foods-idUSKCN1NL2BZ
Pork Plant at Center of South Dakota’s Virus Outbreak Had Visit From CCP-Tied Owners https://www.theepochtimes.com/pork-plant-at-center-of-south-dakotas-virus-outbreak-had-visit-from-ccp-tied-owners_3313529.html
The Chinese Knew What They Were Doing in Spreading the Wuhan Virus https://www.redstate.com/stu-in-sd/2020/03/12/the-chinese-knew-what-they-were-doing-in-spreading-the-wuhan-virus/

Offline Mr. Bill

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Re: Food supply chain problems from COVID-19
« Reply #31 on: April 28, 2020, 09:44:15 PM »
4/28/20: Executive Order on Delegating Authority Under the DPA with Respect to Food Supply Chain Resources During the National Emergency Caused by the Outbreak of COVID-19

Summary: State government rules that force closure of meat-processing plants are nixed if they disagree with CDC and OSHA guidelines, and the Secretary of Agriculture is now meat-processing czar for the purposes of allocating "materials, services, and facilities necessary" for the US meat supply.

Quote
By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, including the Defense Production Act of 1950, as amended (50 U.S.C. 4501 et seq.) (the “Act”), and section 301 of title 3, United States Code, it is hereby ordered as follows: ...

It is important that processors of beef, pork, and poultry (“meat and poultry”) in the food supply chain continue operating and fulfilling orders to ensure a continued supply of protein for Americans.  However, outbreaks of COVID-19 among workers at some processing facilities have led to the reduction in some of those facilities’ production capacity.  In addition, recent actions in some States have led to the complete closure of some large processing facilities.  Such actions may differ from or be inconsistent with interim guidance recently issued by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) of the Department of Health and Human Services and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) of the Department of Labor entitled “Meat and Poultry Processing Workers and Employers” providing for the safe operation of such facilities. ...

Accordingly, I find that meat and poultry in the food supply chain meet the criteria specified in section 101(b) of the Act (50 U.S.C. 4511(b)).  Under the delegation of authority provided in this order, the Secretary of Agriculture shall take all appropriate action under that section to ensure that meat and poultry processors continue operations consistent with the guidance for their operations jointly issued by the CDC and OSHA.  Under the delegation of authority provided in this order, the Secretary of Agriculture may identify additional specific food supply chain resources that meet the criteria of section 101(b). ...

...the authority of the President to require performance of contracts or orders (other than contracts of employment) to promote the national defense over performance of any other contracts or orders, to allocate materials, services, and facilities as deemed necessary or appropriate to promote the national defense, and to implement the Act in subchapter III of chapter 55 of title 50, United States Code (50 U.S.C. 4554, 4555, 4556, 4559, 4560), is delegated to the Secretary of Agriculture with respect to food supply chain resources, including meat and poultry, during the national emergency caused by the outbreak of COVID-19 within the United States.

Secretary of Agriculture shall use the authority under section 101 of the Act, in consultation with the heads of such other executive departments and agencies as he deems appropriate, to determine the proper nationwide priorities and allocation of all the materials, services, and facilities necessary to ensure the continued supply of meat and poultry, consistent with the guidance for the operations of meat and poultry processing facilities jointly issued by the CDC and OSHA. ...

Offline Carver

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Re: Food supply chain problems from COVID-19
« Reply #32 on: April 29, 2020, 07:01:38 AM »
A local butcher shop has a full page ad listing all the farms in our area that will sell directly to the public. They are putting together an online ordering system in the making. No government involvement, this is how it should work and is a very positive development. I've also had communication with local produce farmers about marketing to the public if farmer's market doesn't open soon.

Offline Carver

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« Last Edit: May 05, 2020, 09:11:17 AM by Carver »

Offline LvsChant

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Re: Food supply chain problems from COVID-19
« Reply #34 on: May 07, 2020, 08:20:30 AM »
A local butcher shop has a full page ad listing all the farms in our area that will sell directly to the public. They are putting together an online ordering system in the making. No government involvement, this is how it should work and is a very positive development. I've also had communication with local produce farmers about marketing to the public if farmer's market doesn't open soon.

Good news, Carver! I hope that model is copied all over the country.

Offline Greekman

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Re: Food supply chain problems from COVID-19
« Reply #35 on: May 10, 2020, 01:39:33 AM »
all....
what is your outlook regarding international availability of staple foods ans shortages?

word I get is that countries will save and NOT export their supplies and excesses...i.e. Poland and Latvia will not be exporting wheat, which for the Eu market is a significant loss.
edited to add: Russia is also expected not to export grains...AFAIK it i the largest producer of...

Canada had Bean crops failure, and that will increase prices worldwide...
« Last Edit: May 10, 2020, 01:53:18 AM by Greekman »

Offline David in MN

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Re: Food supply chain problems from COVID-19
« Reply #36 on: May 10, 2020, 11:48:57 AM »
Mike Munger of Duke University wrote a piece I'm struggling to find at the moment. He essentially argued that we don't have food insecurity but a labeling disaster. Think this way: We have a glut of commercial labeled foods and a run on consumer labeled foods. so by merely relaxing FDA label laws we could divert supply chain from restaurants which don't need it to households which do.

It's at least an interesting issue. I will say that owning a business means I can get access to "closed to the public" restaurant supply stores and I have made use of that ability. I'm also not afraid of getting a whole fish and parting it at home. Once you've done catering your mindset on bulk pack things changes.

Offline Carver

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Re: Food supply chain problems from COVID-19
« Reply #37 on: May 10, 2020, 12:37:48 PM »
Quote
Think this way: We have a glut of commercial labeled foods and a run on consumer labeled foods. so by merely relaxing FDA label laws we could divert supply chain from restaurants which don't need it to households which do.
That makes good sense. This is similar to the toilet paper "shortage", a different product for a different buyer through a different distribution system. The distribution systems need to be able to adapt more rapidly. Nonetheless, there is a major problem with meat industry workers working shoulder-to-shoulder with very high infection rates. I disagree with the robot solution if they are made in China.

Offline Morning Sunshine

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Re: Food supply chain problems from COVID-19
« Reply #38 on: May 10, 2020, 12:51:26 PM »
That makes good sense. This is similar to the toilet paper "shortage", a different product for a different buyer through a different distribution system. The distribution systems need to be able to adapt more rapidly. Nonetheless, there is a major problem with meat industry workers working shoulder-to-shoulder with very high infection rates. I disagree with the robot solution if they are made in China.

my neighbor designs, tests, and builds "unmanned vehicles."  He sells all over the world, including robots that defuse bombs (to the Israeli IDF), farm equipment, construction equipment, military trucks, etc.  (He gives field trips to local scout troops, homeschool groups, etc).
A few years back at a neighborhood BBQ, while we were all lamenting the $15 minimum wage garbage, he said "That makes no sense economically, but it is GREAT for my business.  We can build robots to make food."

Anyway, my point is that there are companies here that can do it.

Offline Carver

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Re: Food supply chain problems from COVID-19
« Reply #39 on: May 10, 2020, 01:22:14 PM »
Quote
my neighbor designs, tests, and builds "unmanned vehicles."  He sells all over the world, including robots that defuse bombs (to the Israeli IDF), farm equipment, construction equipment, military trucks, etc.  (He gives field trips to local scout troops, homeschool groups, etc).
A few years back at a neighborhood BBQ, while we were all lamenting the $15 minimum wage garbage, he said "That makes no sense economically, but it is GREAT for my business.  We can build robots to make food."

Anyway, my point is that there are companies here that can do it.

That is good to hear.

Offline Chemsoldier

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Re: Food supply chain problems from COVID-19
« Reply #40 on: May 10, 2020, 06:25:06 PM »
Mike Munger of Duke University wrote a piece I'm struggling to find at the moment. He essentially argued that we don't have food insecurity but a labeling disaster. Think this way: We have a glut of commercial labeled foods and a run on consumer labeled foods. so by merely relaxing FDA label laws we could divert supply chain from restaurants which don't need it to households which do.

It's at least an interesting issue. I will say that owning a business means I can get access to "closed to the public" restaurant supply stores and I have made use of that ability. I'm also not afraid of getting a whole fish and parting it at home. Once you've done catering your mindset on bulk pack things changes.

I have notice the appearance of some number 10 cans of veggies and very large bags of flour and rice in our grocery store.

I assume those were originally intended for the restaurant industry.

Offline Stwood

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Re: Food supply chain problems from COVID-19
« Reply #41 on: May 10, 2020, 06:31:15 PM »

Both of our closest stores have always had those #10 cans and whatnot for restaurants.
A lot of our small cafes, and convenience stores around here, buy their supplies from Walmart, other than ordering from a restaurant supply.

Offline Carver

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Re: Food supply chain problems from COVID-19
« Reply #42 on: May 10, 2020, 08:44:35 PM »
Some people are referring to empty freezers in the microwave pizza department as a food shortage.

Offline Mr. Bill

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Re: Food supply chain problems from COVID-19
« Reply #43 on: May 25, 2020, 02:18:12 PM »
FDA, 5/22/20: FDA Announces Temporary Flexibility Policy Regarding Certain Labeling Requirements for Foods for Humans During COVID-19 Pandemic

Quote
...the FDA is providing flexibility for manufacturers to make minor formulation changes in certain circumstances without making conforming label changes, such as making a change to product ingredients, without updating the ingredient list on the packaged food when such a minor change is made. ...

Specific examples are contained in the guidance. For example, an ingredient could be temporarily reduced or omitted (e.g. green peppers) from a vegetable quiche that contains small amounts of multiple vegetables without a change in the ingredient list on the label.  Substitution of certain oils may temporarily be appropriate without a label change, such as canola oil for sunflower oil, because they contain similar types of fats. ...

Other temporary flexibilities that FDA has issued address nutrition labeling on food packages, menu labeling, packaging and labeling of shell eggs and the distribution of eggs to retail locations.

Offline Stwood

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Re: Food supply chain problems from COVID-19
« Reply #44 on: July 01, 2020, 03:35:58 PM »
Our Walmart today.

2 weeks ago it was in fair shape after some restocking.

Still no ribbing alcohol.
Hydrogen peroxide has disappeared.
Still no disinfectant wipes.
Clorox is limited, and price is high.
Paper plates and bowls was hit hard again.
Garden section was very low. Hoses and tools. Hmmmm
Canning flats were gone.
Plenty of mason jars, spread to places in the store where they didn't fit in.
If you want lids there, you'll have to buy jars.
Canned meat still not up to snuff. Either low or not there.
No Hormel tamales yet. Hormel products was super low.
Chicken legs and quarters was all that was available in chicken.
Steaks and cuts were still high. Nothing under 10.00#
Ground beef, 80/20 was 5.99, somewhat cheaper than a few weeks ago.
Both stores were packed, course this is the coming week of the 4th here in the lake area.