Author Topic: 8 Common First Aid Mistakes And Myths That Make Things Worse  (Read 5477 times)

Offline barnesglobal

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This was referenced on Lifehacker.com today.

http://www.healthwatchcenter.com/2009/03/8-common-first-aid-mistakes-and-myths-that-make-things-worse/

 8 Common First Aid Mistakes And Myths That Make Things Worse
—What Would You Do? Your Misconceptions Could Cause Further Injury!

Emergencies do not come with warning bells. They strike at unexpected moments and your response or lack thereof could be the determinant in how things come out in the end.

How much do you think you know about first aid and proper emergency response? Most people think they know quite a lot, but most of what they have learned consists of myths that could actually do more harm than good.

Put yourself to the test and seriously ask yourself: what would you do in these situations?

1. A child pulls a pot of boiling water off the stove or sticks their hand on a hot burner

Do you put butter or mayonnaise on the burn? Hurriedly remove the child’s clothing because it is stuck to the burn? Get out the ice?

Those are the common reactions in the case of a burn, but all of them are myths.

Butter, mayo or other types of grease may cause even more damage to tender skin and pulling clothing or other materials stuck to the burn could damage the tissue or pull the skin off completely.

The correct action is to rinse gently with cool water and coat the burn with antibiotic ointment. If the burn is on a sensitive area of the body such as the face or if there are a lot of blisters, then go to the ER and do not pop the blisters.

You also want to seek medical assistance if a burn completely circles a limb or is larger than your hand.

2. Someone is having a seizure

Do you move them? Do you hold them still? Do you force open their mouth with your finger or another object, or put something between their teeth? Do you simply watch them carefully and time the seizure?

Again, most of these answers are common first aid mistakes that could lead to injury of the person seizing.

Prying the mouth open or moving them could lead to injuries, such as muscle tears. The only reason they should be moved is if they are in an unsafe place and will likely fall off something and hurt themselves.

Try to put them on their side and call 911. You may want to unbutton the top of their shirt or their belt to help them breathe and try to time the seizure activity. If the person is a known epileptic, emergency services only need to be called if it lasts for longer than five minutes.

Never hold someone having a seizure unless you are preventing them from injury!

3. You step in a hole in the yard and sprain your ankle

Is it ice or heat you use? Do you prop it up? Rush to the ER?

This is a very common injury that many people blow off without seeking medical attention.

In most cases that is okay, but you do need to know how to treat it and when to seek help.

The biggest problem is remembering when to use ice and when to apply heat.

For an ankle sprain you want to apply ice. Heat will actually increase the swelling and could slow down the healing process. If it is painful to put any weight down on the foot then it may be a fracture and you should see a doctor.

4. You are taking a walk through the woods and someone is bitten by a snake

Do you rip off your shirt and wrap the wound? Suck out the poison and spit it on the ground? Get out your pocket knife and carefully cut the wound open so the poison can drain?

You guessed it! These are all myths that can actually be quite dangerous and lead to more injury than is actually necessary. If you cut the wound even slightly you may slice tendons or nerves that cause more damage. Tourniquets often lead to the blood circulation being cut off and could lead to the loss of a limb.

The safest response is to immediately splint the wound or wrap it in something clean and get to the ER right away.

5. Your nose suddenly starts bleeding

Should you lean forward and pinch your nose? Or tip your head all the way back so the blood cannot run out?

More importantly, how do you know when it is serious enough to seek medical intervention?

Nose bleeds are not always emergency situations, but they are the source of a major first aid myth. If you answered that you would lean forward and pinch the nose closed, you were actually correct.

The myth is to tip your head all the way back so the blood cannot flow out, but this could be dangerous with a heavy nose bleed that doesn’t stop quickly.

For a nose bleed, lean forward and pinch just underneath the bone. If the bleeding does not stop within five minutes seek medical attention.

6. Your three-year-old gets a hold of the Flintstones vitamins and eats the whole bottle

Do you assume children’s vitamins are safe and they will just be really healthy for a few weeks?

Do you grab the ipecac from the bathroom and force vomiting? Do you simply run to the ER?

In the case of vitamins, it is important to seek medical attention as soon as possible.

Children die every year from an overdose of iron and children’s vitamins are a main source of iron. For poisons in general, you want to keep the product that was swallowed and call poison control immediately. Depending on what was swallowed different actions will need to be taken, so you must remain calm enough to speak clearly and hear what you are instructed to do for the child.

It is now advised that all ipecac be thrown out completely. It is no longer considered a safe medical intervention, as some poisons can actually be made worse by vomiting. Also, a patient vomiting can seriously interfere with treatment once they are at the hospital.

7. Someone starts to choke across the dinner table

Do you jump behind them and do the Heimlich maneuver? Hand them their glass and encourage them to drink? Pat them lightly on the back?

Your response to someone choking will depend on whether they are able to talk a little bit or if they cannot make any sound. If they are coughing violently and can speak a little, then it is a partial blockage. If they can only nod their head and/or are turning blue, then it is a full blockage that does require you to jump up and start thrusting upward around their stomach.

The Heimlich maneuver will force air up through the body and help dislodge whatever is choking the person, but only in the case of a full blockage.

If some air is getting through, then encourage them to continue coughing and stay close by, but you do not need to take action unless they start to have breathing trouble or turn blue. Do not give them anything to drink, as the fluid will take up what little space is left for air to pass through. In most cases a partial blockage can be coughed out, but if it becomes a full blockage then once again the Heimlich maneuver will be necessary.

Do not perform the Heimlich on a child less than a year old.

8. Your child suddenly has an extremely high fever

Do you give them Tylenol and wrap them in a warm blanket to sweat it out? Rub them down with rubbing alcohol? Put them in a tub full of cold water?

While there are traces of good advice in two of these options, none of them are the best route to take with a fever.

The biggest myth is that rubbing a child’s chest or forehead with rubbing alcohol will break a fever.

The child will actually breathe in the alcohol, and their young systems are extremely sensitive to this substance. It is not healthy for them.

While there may be some truth to the old wife’s tale of sweating out a fever, it is not a good thing to try with a child. Sudden high fevers can lead to febrile seizures, so putting them in a cool bath (not cold!) and giving them something like children’s Tylenol to break the fever (if they are old enough for medication) is a better course of action. If you cannot get the fever down or if it goes above 104 Fahrenheit, you should seek medical attention.

How many of these myths did you think were just standard first aid procedure? How many missteps might you have made if these things occurred in your home? Any of these things could happen and cause minor injuries that do not rise to the occasion of a true emergency, but you never know when something seriously tragic may happen.

The ability to think on your feet and take the safest and most effective course of action is essential, especially in situations where you may be the only person around to help someone in need.

Offline chris

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Re: 8 Common First Aid Mistakes And Myths That Make Things Worse
« Reply #1 on: July 09, 2009, 11:25:40 AM »
I agree with most of that,  assuming your close to an ER. If not, I hope some has a snake bite kit.

Offline Nate

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Re: 8 Common First Aid Mistakes And Myths That Make Things Worse
« Reply #2 on: July 09, 2009, 11:45:48 AM »
We addressed all of these and more myths in my Wilderness First Responder course. 

In regards to the snake bite, if hours or days from an ER you do the same thing for a snake bite as listed in this post.  You have more of a chance of getting a dose of venom from a young snake than you do an older one.  Older ones know when to use their venom and when not to.   So, you may have venom in your system or you may not.  There is no need to kill the snake and bring it into the hospital for ID.  Anti-venom for the venomous snakes in the area are carried at the local ER.

Anyone know of other myths?

Offline USA83

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Re: 8 Common First Aid Mistakes And Myths That Make Things Worse
« Reply #3 on: July 10, 2009, 12:39:28 PM »
Couple things to add to this list.
A good reminder for when to use heat and cold is if it just happened Almost always use Cold.
Cold works because it restricts blood vessels and reduces bleeding and inflammation.
Heat is used because  it will allow joints and muscles to relax and move more freely. MOSTLY for chronic/long standing problems. Such as torn/sore muscles and ache joints.
and always if possible elevate the hurt extremity this allows gravity to help reduce inflammation by putting less pressure on the veins and allowing more free flowing veinous return. Your circulatory system works just like a pump and water system. If your pumping water up hill it takes more pressure and more work. but if you are pumping water down hill its easier and moves faster.

 If you have just sprained an ankle try to leave your shoe or boot on until you get to where you can rest or the hospital (if needed) because if you remove it you may not  be able to put it back on.

Seizures, the first time you see one you will never forget it. They wiggle, shake, spit, drool and when that is done they turn blue. Most important thing to do is move anything you can away from them.  So they don't hurt themselves. If the object wont move, move them. Watch their head. It is a wifes tell that they will swallow their tongue. However their tongue can close their airway. So what you need to do is when you can (don't hurt them or yourself) Turn them so their on their left side is down in the recovery position. http://www.phy.cam.ac.uk/hands/emergencies/firstaid3.jpg
 
This works because it allows them to not swallow any fluid they may have threw up and lets the tongue fall forward away from their throat/airway.

With the bloody nose same as above use cold to constrict blood vessels and apply pressure just above the bridge of your nose squeeze and it should stop. Lean forward so you are not swallowing blood, and it does not go down the wrong pipe and into your lungs.(pneumonia is bad)

When it comes to fevers anything above 104.0 needs to go to the hospital. If this fever is because of sickness then its probably ok to give them Tylenol, If it is because of the enviroment (exposure) You MUST cool them down. Get them out of the sun, Get them down to underwear and then use cool liquid to cool them down.  The places to put cold packs is The groin, underarms and on the Carotid arteries of the neck. You need to cool down their brain temperature so they don't have seizures. Put Cool water (not cold) all over their body. to let the wind (if any) help cool them down and call 911.

I know I didn't really add too much to this list but if you know how and why things work you can make them work with other problems. If you guys have any questions or need help with anything PM me.

Butch



Offline LdMorgan

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Re: 8 Common First Aid Mistakes And Myths That Make Things Worse
« Reply #4 on: August 03, 2009, 09:03:22 PM »
Got to comment on this one.

For burns--except chemical burns, of course--cold is the first and best treatment, bar none.

The worse the burn, the more effective cold is.

A burn does not stop "burning" when the source of heat is removed. The chemical reaction caused by excessive heat continues and cell damage continues to increase for a fairly long period of time.

Applying very cold water or packing with slushy ice slows down the propagation of cell damage markedly. The cold should not be over-done (of course!) but it should not be completely discontinued until the injury no longer "starts burning again" as soon the cold is removed.

In the case of severe 2nd-degree burns over 50% of the body, that can be as long as eight hours. In that particular case (which I observed) the victim healed with no blister formation at all, and no sloughing of the skin later. The skin remained fully supple, and the burned area was substantially pain-free after 8 hours of cooling.

The cold also provides pain relief to a very great degree. That is partially offset by the discomfort of being cold, but coldness is much less painful than burns.


Concerning snakebite:

For those bitten by poisonous snakes, spiders, bees, hornets, etc, there is a reliable lifesaving technique that works equally well on any kind of venom whether hemotoxic, neurotoxic, or cytotoxic.

It's been used for decades in India, where people step on cobras rather often. It'll even work on the bite of sea snakes--for which no antivenin exists, and whose bite is 100% fatal to humans--and that dinky little blue-ringed octopus in Australia.

It's very simple: Get the victim to a running gasoline engine as fast as possible and use the
30,000-volt hi-tension lead off the coil to shock the snot out of the wound site a few times.

The electrical jolt denatures the venom by scrambling its protein structure.

Once well scrambled, it's a minor irritant rather than a lethal toxin, and the body can deal with it very easily.

This can be something well worth doing for people dangerously allergic to bee stings that get hit, and don't have immediate access to their meds.

Hare of Caerbannog

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Re: 8 Common First Aid Mistakes And Myths That Make Things Worse
« Reply #5 on: August 03, 2009, 09:12:15 PM »

Concerning snakebite:

For those bitten by poisonous snakes, spiders, bees, hornets, etc, there is a reliable lifesaving technique that works equally well on any kind of venom whether hemotoxic, neurotoxic, or cytotoxic.

It's been used for decades in India, where people step on cobras rather often. It'll even work on the bite of sea snakes--for which no antivenin exists, and whose bite is 100% fatal to humans--and that dinky little blue-ringed octopus in Australia.

It's very simple: Get the victim to a running gasoline engine as fast as possible and use the
30,000-volt hi-tension lead off the coil to shock the snot out of the wound site a few times.

The electrical jolt denatures the venom by scrambling its protein structure.

Once well scrambled, it's a minor irritant rather than a lethal toxin, and the body can deal with it very easily.

This can be something well worth doing for people dangerously allergic to bee stings that get hit, and don't have immediate access to their meds.


WOW!
Holy Cow!
I'm not saying this to doubt you, but do you have some documentation for that?
I would love to read up on this. Does this work for jelly fish stings? How about Ray stings?
Wow.

Offline LdMorgan

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Re: 8 Common First Aid Mistakes And Myths That Make Things Worse
« Reply #6 on: August 03, 2009, 10:04:07 PM »
WOW!
Holy Cow!
I'm not saying this to doubt you, but do you have some documentation for that?
I would love to read up on this. Does this work for jelly fish stings? How about Ray stings?
Wow.


To explain: back in '73 I bought the Ross Allen Snake Institute from the owners of Silver Springs Attractions, down heah in Florida, and went into the venom biz.

I sold freeze-dried venom to Universities, etc. There was a lot of research going on then with a venom fraction called Cobroxin that could apparently relieve even the most intractable pain of terminal cancer patients and the like.

(That one never made it to the drug store, as far as I know.)

I was doing  a LOT of studying at the time, and ran across a research paper about the use of electric shock (as I described) in India. There were before-and-after microphotographs of cobra venom samples, and the difference was simply amazing. I've also found a few other supporting articles over the years.

All that data, and more, is out there. Ya just gotta Google at it.

I can tell you of one further refinement, or actually a variant technique: you can also denature venoms in the body with a series of strong magnetic pulses. Google "Bob Beck" and "The Thumpy Files" and you'll be off and running on some VERY interesting stuff.

I wrote the Thumpy Files, BTW, and they are still archived on Keelynet.

I don't want to hijack the thread (dangit!) but I know things about "Mr. Thumpy" (the device) that would knock yer socks off. Read up, and then private-message me it you want to chat about it.

I never tried Mr. Thumpy on snake venom, but he could purely cure the hell out of early-stage gangrene. Among other things.

As for rays and mantas, I do know that their "venom" is really just a nasty slime-layer on their barbs. I don't know anything about its composition, so beyond that I'm clueless.

I have used Mr. Thumpy on manta strikes, which are noted for being very slow to heal because of the wound contamination. The response was very good.

I kind of think the high-voltage trick would probably be overkill on a ray sting.





Offline The Wilderness

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Re: 8 Common First Aid Mistakes And Myths That Make Things Worse
« Reply #7 on: August 03, 2009, 11:19:45 PM »
WOW!
Holy Cow!
I'm not saying this to doubt you, but do you have some documentation for that?
I would love to read up on this. Does this work for jelly fish stings? How about Ray stings?
Wow.


HoC, I saw a reference to this article last week. Took me a while to find it, but it deals with Brown Recluse Spider bite treatment with electricity from a lawn mower.http://www.brownreclusespiderbitetreatment.com/.

Interesting read.

The Wilderness

walker

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Re: 8 Common First Aid Mistakes And Myths That Make Things Worse
« Reply #8 on: August 04, 2009, 12:07:28 AM »
To explain: back in '73 I bought the Ross Allen Snake Institute from the owners of Silver Springs Attractions, down heah in Florida, and went into the venom biz.

I sold freeze-dried venom to Universities, etc. There was a lot of research going on then with a venom fraction called Cobroxin that could apparently relieve even the most intractable pain of terminal cancer patients and the like.

(That one never made it to the drug store, as far as I know.)

I was doing  a LOT of studying at the time, and ran across a research paper about the use of electric shock (as I described) in India. There were before-and-after microphotographs of cobra venom samples, and the difference was simply amazing. I've also found a few other supporting articles over the years.

All that data, and more, is out there. Ya just gotta Google at it.

I can tell you of one further refinement, or actually a variant technique: you can also denature venoms in the body with a series of strong magnetic pulses. Google "Bob Beck" and "The Thumpy Files" and you'll be off and running on some VERY interesting stuff.

I wrote the Thumpy Files, BTW, and they are still archived on Keelynet.

I don't want to hijack the thread (dangit!) but I know things about "Mr. Thumpy" (the device) that would knock yer socks off. Read up, and then private-message me it you want to chat about it.

I never tried Mr. Thumpy on snake venom, but he could purely cure the hell out of early-stage gangrene. Among other things.

As for rays and mantas, I do know that their "venom" is really just a nasty slime-layer on their barbs. I don't know anything about its composition, so beyond that I'm clueless.

I have used Mr. Thumpy on manta strikes, which are noted for being very slow to heal because of the wound contamination. The response was very good.

I kind of think the high-voltage trick would probably be overkill on a ray sting.

Idmorgan,

I am in no way going to argue with your experiences, but I think you should read some up to date research from current experts who do nothing but treat venom injuries.  I am not a venom expert, but I would like to inform others to be very wary of utilizing electrical shock treatment for any venom injury.  It certainly is great to have an open forum where we can discuss ideas and share experiences, but for goodness snakes, keep away from the electrical devices!


http://www.herper.com/venom/electro.html

http://www.docsdetecting.com/docsplace/aoi/snakbite.html


Use of stun guns for venomous bites and stings: a review.
Ben Welch E, Gales BJ.

Department of Pharmacy Practice, School of Pharmacy, Southwestern Oklahoma State University, Weatherford, USA. welchb@swosu.edu

During the past 2 decades, articles suggesting that stun guns be utilized to treat venomous bites and stings have appeared in both the lay and medical press. Although never widely considered to be standard therapy for venomous bites and stings, stun guns are still considered to be a treatment option by some medical practitioners and outdoor enthusiasts. A Medline search was performed using these terms: venomous bites, venomous stings, snake bites, spider bites, electrical, stun gun, high voltage electricity, low amperage electricity, direct current, and shock therapy. Articles selected included laboratory-based isolated venom studies, animal studies, and case reports involving humans in which a stun gun or some other source of high voltage, low amperage direct current electric shocks were used to treat actual or simulated venomous bites or stings. We concluded that the use of stun guns or other sources of high voltage, low amperage direct current electric shocks to treat venomous bites and stings is not supported by the literature.

« Last Edit: May 01, 2013, 12:21:22 AM by Archer »

Offline LdMorgan

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Re: 8 Common First Aid Mistakes And Myths That Make Things Worse
« Reply #9 on: August 04, 2009, 03:06:20 PM »
HoC, I saw a reference to this article last week. Took me a while to find it, but it deals with Brown Recluse Spider bite treatment with electricity from a lawn mower.http://www.brownreclusespiderbitetreatment.com/.

Interesting read.

The Wilderness

What an excellent post! Pictures & everything! Kudos & a +!!

I can make a couple of observations on this report.

First: After the treatment the guy started feeling woozy & got the shivers. This is a classic reaction to a certain type of uremia called Holtzheimer's Syndrome (orDisease).This occurs when the kidneys are mechanically overloaded with cellular debris. It can happen when someone massively over-exercises (thus killing off a lot of muscle cells and generating a lot of debris) and it can happen after Rife Ray treatments, where dead bacteria and viruses provide the bulk of the debris. Seriousness of the reaction is typically proportion to the overload, and the degree of kidney health. In extreme cases, it can lead to total kidney failure.

In this instance, the debris was from the bite toxin, infecting bacteria, dead tissue killed by the toxin and/or bacteria, and (probably) quite a few newly-electrocuted cells.

All that gave him a very mild case of Holtzheimer's--which his kidneys handled quickly and easily.

(By the way--I think he probably shocked himself about three times more than was actually necessary--but much better safe than sorry.)

Second: The affected area healed white. That's predictable: That white area is probably scar tissue, which doesn't tan like ordinary skin.

All of the seriously damaged cells in that area were scavenged out, and scar tissue replaced them. The scar is smooth (and probably relatively supple) because there was no great mechanical disruption of the tissues--so healing was an easy, efficient, and orderly process. First-Intention healing at its very best, in other words.

Lawnmowers are good, and for all you OK-Lumberjack types out there a chain saw could do the job, too, so carry a pair of leads, just in case.


Offline LdMorgan

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Re: 8 Common First Aid Mistakes And Myths That Make Things Worse
« Reply #10 on: August 04, 2009, 03:46:13 PM »
Idmorgan,

I am in no way going to argue with your experiences, but I think you should read some up to date research from current experts who do nothing but treat venom injuries.  I am not a venom expert, but I would like to inform others to be very wary of utilizing electrical shock treatment for any venom injury.  It certainly is great to have an open forum where we can discuss ideas and share experiences, but for goodness snakes, keep away from the electrical devices!

*references posted


Fine post, scrubs, and I was glad for a chance to read up on your references.

(GREAT gag in yer last line, BTW! We need more of that. +1!)

You are right: I am very much out of date on the research. I hadn't heard about the Ecuadorian report, nor the frenzy of the stun gun manufacturers to boost their sales.

(Hey--why stop with stun guns? Old Sparky* will do the trick, every time!)

I really appreciate your balanced approach to scientific disagreement. Usually people just scream at me until I have a splitting  headache. :)

The literature, which is the Supreme Court of science, it's ALWAYS contradictory on every subject until the last of the "old guard" on some particular subject dies. And, even then, contradictions persist as a newer "new guard" arises with a truer truth.

One man's science is another man's heresy, and they keep changing the music.

All one can so is sieve the oceans of opinion, and try to find the truth that may be most useful at a given time and place.

There are still people out there that think the Earth is flat, (and that's okay for them, as long as they don't sail too close to the edge) and people that keep on digging up scientific proof for the existence of the Aether.

Reality is soooo....(puff!)....complex....that I sometimes wonder if Truth isn't the total nexus of each person's alternate realities, or worse yet, the origin of them.

(Sheesh! I gotta quit smokin' this stuff!)

Oh--That explains it: Cloves. I hate cloves.



*Foah all y'all Yankees ahyut theah, Ole' Sparkeh is Flowridah's E-lectric Chayah!

« Last Edit: May 01, 2013, 01:04:18 AM by Archer »

walker

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Re: 8 Common First Aid Mistakes And Myths That Make Things Worse
« Reply #11 on: August 04, 2009, 11:23:21 PM »
LdMorgan,

You are just the sort of guy I like to sit alongside at the lake and discuss why crickets chirp and bugs fly into the flame.  No matter how we may disagree, it is a warm and friendly disagreement.  No matter how much you utterly confuse me, it is entertaining to listen to your style of wisdom.  Too many folks take themselves so seriously these days, and they can't look at themselves for the imperfect human beings we are, and just laugh out loud. 

Twenty years ago, I was living alone out of a backpack in Tennessee for over three months, and I carried my trusty stun-gun "just in case" one of those darn snakes bit me.  My battery died within a few weeks because I fired it off every morning before I hit the trail.  I sat there with my life-saving device, wondering what the heck am I gonna do now.  So I made a pact with the snake.  "I won't kill you, or eat you, or poke you with a stick, so long as you don't ever bite me." This worked as well as any electrical shock device... it made me worry less.  Funny thing is, a little over a year later in the jungle of Panama, I was one of the few not so worried about snakes.  I told my fellow soldiers about my little agreement with the snake, they laughed at me and killed them anytime they could.  One day, I am out for a little walk around our area, and a fer de lance runs right between my legs and bit the compass man behind me.  Lucky for him it must have been a dry bite, as those are some angry snakes! 

Leave those snakes alone, that is the best scientific and pseudoscience advice I give to everyone.  Now what was that about the "nexus of alternate realities"?
« Last Edit: May 01, 2013, 12:21:04 AM by Archer »

Offline LdMorgan

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Re: 8 Common First Aid Mistakes And Myths That Make Things Worse
« Reply #12 on: August 05, 2009, 12:21:11 AM »
I suspect, scrubs, that the compact you made that day was truly made from your heart, and that, for that reason, you are now Snake Totem, and one with your Clan brothers.

Not joking, dead serious.

I think the fer de lance was just saying hi, BTW, and playing a little joke at the same time...

There is more to reality than just complexity. There is mystery, too.



And, yeah, good conversation is hard to find. Maybe we'll be at the same place sometime, and get caught up on every subject that was ever worth wonderin' about.

You bring the firewood, I'll bring the firewater.
« Last Edit: May 01, 2013, 01:03:50 AM by Archer »

Offline Hoxbar

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Re: 8 Common First Aid Mistakes And Myths That Make Things Worse
« Reply #13 on: August 28, 2009, 04:05:47 PM »
If a burn is really bad, like a 2nd or 3rd degree burn it should also be bandaged with a sterile dressing to try to cut down on infection.

Offline drthumbs

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Re: 8 Common First Aid Mistakes And Myths That Make Things Worse
« Reply #14 on: September 17, 2009, 02:45:11 PM »
Snake bites are tricky things to pin down. Only one of four bite result in envenomation, then only one in four envenomations are “serious”. I cannot cite any references on that so through it out if you with. This leads to alternate remedies such as venom electrolysis are hard to quantify. I am not saying ti will not work...I don't know.  The idea of denaturing the venom (proteins) seems sound, but the required voltage and amperage have been all over the place from what I have read. In a situation where I could not get rapid medical attention, I think I would try it.

I do not know of any effective snake bite kits on the market.  The most popular is the sawyers extractor has been proven ineffective and could possibly do more harm that good.

“The human study, published in 2004 by researchers at the University of California in Fresno, found that the device removed no more than 1% to 2% of mock venom from the leg.“

I have used the extractor on a wasp sting, and it seemed to help a lot, but with a wasp, the venom is very close to the surface, unlike a typical snakebite.

Lymphatic restriction bands should not be used by most people. Venom is spread (most of the time) in the lymph ducts that return interstitial fluid back to the circulatory system. A lymphatic restriction band  need to be wide (three to four inches) and when applied it is important that venous (let alone arterial) flow is not impeded, but tight enough to restrict flow in the lymph ducts.  This balance is necessary to get any benefit from the restriction band.  I have been trained on the application of a restriction band and I cannot say that I can apply it properly. Furthermore, if applied properly, there seems to be some debate on its actual effectiveness and benefit.

The definitive care of a snake bite is anti-venom.