Author Topic: Body Weights For Overall Fitness Health?  (Read 5365 times)

Offline fngrlickingood

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Body Weights For Overall Fitness Health?
« on: August 02, 2009, 10:46:10 PM »
How do you all feel about using body weights (arm, wrist, vest, ankle, etc.) for increasing overall physical fitness health? Are there dangers to wearing body weights (like pulling muscles, rolling ankles, etc.) during normal day to day activities or is it safe? Would they help increase stamina or strength? I'm looking for a way to get a little extra exercise in during the day and become a little more fit and thought wearing weights might be a way to do this. Let me know what you think, your advice is greatly appreciated! Thanks!

Offline chris

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Re: Body Weights For Overall Fitness Health?
« Reply #1 on: August 02, 2009, 10:49:33 PM »
I'd be careful of putting too much weight on the extremeties. Walking with extra weight on the wrists is unnatural and the body isn't designed for it.

Offline javabrewer

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Re: Body Weights For Overall Fitness Health?
« Reply #2 on: February 04, 2010, 10:28:48 AM »
I would also not suggest this.  While it may not cause acute injuries immediately there is the chance of nerve damage via overuse as your body is weighted in places it's not built to naturally support much weight on.

Either weight train in the traditional sense or start doing aerobics to get your body moving naturally -- and help your cardio!

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Re: Body Weights For Overall Fitness Health?
« Reply #3 on: February 04, 2010, 05:01:57 PM »
I have seen a lot of people get hurt this way.  Be careful. 

Offline Orionblade

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Re: Body Weights For Overall Fitness Health?
« Reply #4 on: February 04, 2010, 06:30:28 PM »
Weight vests are not a half bad idea, but don't go over about 20 pounds. There's a reason large people have back and hip problems, and why doctors say "you could stand to lose 20 pounds..."

I'd use it during a low impact exercise like pushups, pull ups, etc.

Running with ankle weights is horrible, not so much with wrist weights.

I suppose I should mention I ran track and cross country in high school, to include hurdles, so I've been down this road before.

Pun intended...

Anyhow, weights on the ankles do three big things - first, they throw off your stride, second, they build the wrong muscle types and groups for devleoping thrust - i.e. you resist the raising of your foot instead of the thrust-generating action) and they shake around on your ankle, no matter how tight you make 'em, and can actually bruise and abrade contact points, as well as farking with tendons and the like.

In other words, don't run with weights. Use them for static or quasi-static resistance, and even then you're better off with something like a theraband or something that can't shift and hurt you. Worst case scenario, you put too much theraband around something and you just can't move it.

The weight vests might be decent for climbing, hiking, or walking, but you might as well carry a useful loadout instead of dead weight. I think a 2 gallon camelbak and a 72 hour kit would about do it for a 20 or 30 pound load for a day hike.

Other low-impact resistance options, other than therabands, are pools/the ocean/lakes/etc. and calesthenics and similar exercises, potentially combined with weights.

For running, your best options to increase stamina are low impact, slow, long duration, repetitive movements with moderate to heavy weights. For speed and explosive power, IIRC, slightly faster (not jerky, still smooth motion) high rep, low weight tends to build oxidative and glycolytic fast twitch muscle fibers, whereas the low/slow/heavy tends to stimulate more oxidative slow twitch (oxidative has myoglobin, and is "red meat" while glycolytic tends to be "white" - no, or little, myoglobin, gets all its ATP from glycolysis. Once the glycogen is gone, they're toast, which is why you can only sprint about a quarter to three eighths of a mile, max)

Just as a test of this, I ran 200 meters without breathing. I didn't hold my breath, per se, but I just didn't breathe, and holding your breath for 29-30 seconds is NOT hard. I ran  miles consistently in 5:30-5:45, and I breathed my ass off after just a minute or so. Your oidative muscles don't need oxygen while operating, they need it to make ATP - and even when exhausted, your muscles still have roughly 50% of the ATP they started with - it's just membrane potentials and concentration gradients that start failing at that point - also muscle "Fatigue" is related to CO2 concentration and neurology, which in addition to altering membrane potentials at the axon terminus, makes your brain think it's about to break something, so your muscles become less and less responsive.

Offline sandanbob

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Re: Body Weights For Overall Fitness Health?
« Reply #5 on: March 11, 2010, 06:14:00 PM »
When I first saw the title, I thought it was referring to 'body weight exercises,' which I think are great.  And, you can change the difficulty of them by changing angles, total number, number per unit of time, etcetera.  Another idea would be the "strong man" type of exercises.  For example, beating on a (not one mounted on a vehicle, but a worn out one) with a sledge hammer.  Exercises that mimic work.  Anyway- just some thoughts based on my initial reading of the title.  As far as the wearing of weights- I would not do it, beyond using a one pound weight for heavy bag training.

Offline The Professor

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Re: Body Weights For Overall Fitness Health?
« Reply #6 on: March 11, 2010, 06:44:05 PM »
What Orion Said.

The only thing I might suggest differently is: Instead of a weight vest for climbing, hiking or walking, just use the pack itself.  A vest is going to distribute weight differently than a pack.  Wearing such a vest for preparing to carry a pack trains different muscles.

Just a suggestion.

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Offline Orionblade

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Re: Body Weights For Overall Fitness Health?
« Reply #7 on: March 12, 2010, 11:45:59 AM »
Good point. Come to think of it, that's one reason I have my BOB kitted out in little clip-on mini-packs, so I can swap stuff from my bag to pockets and belt loops, etc. while on the move to change up the weight distro. Nobody likes stuff banging around , but if I can stuff five pounds of tools and supplies into cargo pockets, and clip two or three pounds to my bag's shoulder straps, it gets 7 pounds out of the total 28 pounds off my back and in line with my center of gravity.


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Re: Body Weights For Overall Fitness Health?
« Reply #8 on: March 17, 2010, 10:52:20 AM »
Love the idea of using your bob to work out!  The weight vest however allows you to overload those bodyweight exercises you've already mastered and no longer find challenging.  Burpees with a ruck don't work too well but with a vest they rock.  Ankle and wrist weights can be dangerous on exercises which produce momentum but slow movements can be useful although I prefer a steel pipe or rebar.

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Offline The Professor

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Re: Body Weights For Overall Fitness Health?
« Reply #9 on: March 17, 2010, 08:51:03 PM »
Just for fun, try carrying a slosh pipe when walking, even on a treadmill.  Your support muscles will definitely let you know.

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Offline fngrlickingood

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Re: Body Weights For Overall Fitness Health?
« Reply #10 on: March 22, 2010, 10:35:59 PM »
Thanks for all your feedback! I appreciate you all taking the time to respond. I am really out of shape so I have been starting slow (with no weights or anything) just walking, jogging, and my favorite - swimming. Thank you again for your advice!

Offline CyborgX

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Re: Body Weights For Overall Fitness Health?
« Reply #11 on: March 26, 2010, 07:03:20 AM »
I dunno about using ankle weights for fitness purposes, but in the winter when I run to and from work, I wear snow boots. Those weigh in at around 5 pounds each, and on top of that I've usually got a 20-30 pound pack on my back.

I'm not really doing it for training or anything. That's just how I make it to and from work in the winter.

Offline Garith

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Re: Body Weights For Overall Fitness Health?
« Reply #12 on: April 09, 2010, 10:21:43 PM »
When I use to do sword work back in the day I used the wrist weights and would just get beaten by my partner but once those weights came off....I had trouble keeping track of my swings. But as many said they do promote injury and I had to do extensive warm up and cool down routines. when I didn't I would mess up something. Paying for it now later in life.

Offline patrat

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Re: Body Weights For Overall Fitness Health?
« Reply #13 on: April 16, 2010, 10:09:25 AM »
What is a slosh pipe?

Offline The Professor

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Re: Body Weights For Overall Fitness Health?
« Reply #14 on: April 16, 2010, 01:55:39 PM »
Basically about a 7-foot long piece of 4" or 6" diameter PVC pipe filled with enough water to get to the weight you want (I prefer a 40-lb total weight).  You don't fill it all the way.

Glue the ends on permanently and mark  the quarter- and half-way points.

Once it's ready, you can do all sorts of exercises with it.  Hold it in the crook of your arms and try to walk.  The water won't stay still and you'll be forced to compensate.  This is a KILLER workout for your core.  Hold it across your shoulders and you'd be surprised at how freakishly difficult it is to walk a straight line.

One suggestion, though. . .do NOT try to negotiate obstacles until you've worked out with the slosh pipe A LOT.

Some people permanently affix solid or rope handles to the pipe.  This adds a whole new dimension to bicep curls, tricep kick-backs, leg lifts, etc.

It's one of those tools you can make at home and adds a whole new dimension to that boring pushing-metal-around type of workout.

Hope it helps.

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Offline Orionblade

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Re: Body Weights For Overall Fitness Health?
« Reply #15 on: April 17, 2010, 01:09:01 AM »
When I use to do sword work back in the day I used the wrist weights and would just get beaten by my partner but once those weights came off....I had trouble keeping track of my swings. But as many said they do promote injury and I had to do extensive warm up and cool down routines. when I didn't I would mess up something. Paying for it now later in life.

When weighting a sword, you want to put a weight out ON the sword, not on your hand. Funny as it sounds, you don't want to put it on the center of gravity of the sword either, but at about 1/3 of the lenght of the blade (Depending on profile) from the tip, so it's as close as possible to the natural node that occurs there. Lots of physics, but essentially it's the dead/sweet spot, where vibrations in the blade tend to go to zero. This makes the sword much easier to control, but still gives you the weight + leverage needed to add to the workout. Wrist weights in this scenario would put too much lateral shear on the wrist joint, essentially sending your fingers and thumb one direction while pushing your radius and ulna in another, separating the joint that really should be seated quite tightly when handling impacts and rapid changes in momentum. I imagine you have some tendon problems, and perhaps carpal tunnel?

Offline sdcharger

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Re: Body Weights For Overall Fitness Health?
« Reply #16 on: April 30, 2010, 05:38:24 PM »
When I was a college kid, my hiking pals and I did 7-14 day hikes several times per year.  In order to train for the hikes, we would load our packs full of our gear and head to the local trail system for regular exercise.  Good way to break in your new hiking boots too.