Author Topic: Bidding on eBay to win.  (Read 3120 times)

Offline LdMorgan

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Bidding on eBay to win.
« on: August 21, 2009, 10:11:41 AM »
I've been bidding on eBay off & on for years.

I started bidding on a lot of stuff recently, where winning mattered.

I did ok--but I didn't start out bidding right, and I can tell ya--winning got a lot easier when I finally got smart.

Here's how most people make mistakes on an eBay auction:

1)They pick an auction, and bid several days before the auction is due to end. That gives everybody and his cousin notice that someone wants what they already bid on, and then the  war is on. NEVER BID EARLY!

2) People get emotional, and fight for an item. I've seen people bid junk to astronomical prices, just because they refused to lose the auction. By then, the issue is not winning the auction, it's all about kicking somebody's auction-butt. Being the top dog. You should pick your maximum fair price and NEVER  exceed that figure. It's no big deal if you lose: There will be another one of those "unique" items along on the next bus--guaranteed!

3. Study the bid pattern. Is something "hot"--are ten people bidding on it? They may fight each other and blow right past your fair-to-decent bid. Look around for another auction on the same item. Chances are, you'll find the same thing being overlooked because it's further down the list. If so, bid on that one. If only a couple of people are bidding on something, you have a better chance to win.

4. Bid low, but not too low. You can waste a lot of time trying to steal things on eBay.

5. ALWAYS count the shipping & insurance as part of your bid price. Ditto for taxes, if any. Work out your best "fair" price, then deduct all the extras, and bid the lesser amount.

And last and most important: SNIPE every auction the SMART way!

You can spend endless hours watching an auction wind down to the last eleven seconds so you can put a 2-cents higher bid in without triggering a price war. If you have six auctions coming due within one minute of each other, that can get really hectic. I actually did that for a while. I got very good ar speed-sniping, and worked my butt off.

Then I found the fastest bestest way to snipe: Just subscribe to BIDNAPPER.

You find what you want to bid on, copy in the eBay auction number, and enter the price you're willing to pay. Then you iust sit back and wait for the auction to be over.

The Bidnapper robot will tend you auction, and a few seconds before it closes will enter a bid for you.

Not your maximum bid, usually--the bid will be just enough to beat the currently "high" guy.

The robot will step-bid at high speed if the other guy is also using a robot. You may go right up to your maximum bid, and at that point your robot will stop bidding. If yours was the last/highest bid, you win.

If the bids go past your maximum, you lose--exactly as if you bid by hand with impeccable discipline.

Whee! I just won two 99-cent auctions (plus shipping). Toys for the grand-kids. I didn't have to hover over the auctions. I just put in the bid I thought would do the job, and waited to see the results. I won. More importantly, I won at a fair price without a lot of anxiety.


One last thing about eBay:

It can be an invaluable tool. You can find the damnedest things at bargain prices. And you can
make a ton of money selling crap on eBay, if you do it right.

I'm fixing to open up an eBay store, and sell plans for some of my designs for camp gear: my super-duper trestle table, take-down beds, that sort of stuff. And my new chicken tractor...

Maybe I'll make enough to finally take those ballet lessons I shoulda took when I was four.







Offline TimSuggs

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Re: Bidding on eBay to win.
« Reply #1 on: August 21, 2009, 10:27:32 AM »
Great post LdMorgan!  Another +1 fer ya my friend!  Just remember, all these folks are going to be bidding against you (us) now.  I'm a long time eBay sniper myself.  And I prefer to "feel the trigger" personally.  Yeah, I may slip up or have a hiccup in my internet connection and loose a few every now and then, but I win a lot more than I loose.  And so far, I've only let myself succumb to a "bid war" with someone else twice in about ten years on eBay and lost them both thankfully.  I set the price in my mind that I am willing to pay for an item, including all applicable fees, etc. and then that's it.  I wait til the last second or so and that's the bid I enter, I either win, or I loose, but I NEVER pay more than I wanted to because of testosterone poisoning.

You'll never guess what my eBay ID is, yeah, your right, how'd you know it's timsuggs???  And I figure as long as I use that alias, nobody will ever figure out my real name!  Uh... sorry, my bad... that IS my real name. 

Tim.

Offline Imperial Goat

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Re: Bidding on eBay to win.
« Reply #2 on: October 03, 2009, 07:34:05 AM »
Also, search for misspelled items.  If the seller does not spell the item right in the auction title, most folks who would bid on it don't find it.  If you are creative in your item searches, you might be the only person bidding on something you want.  I've had luck with this a time or two.

Offline ncjeeper

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Re: Bidding on eBay to win.
« Reply #3 on: October 03, 2009, 11:47:00 AM »
Good info for the novices. I have been using ebay for 9 years now. Sell a few things & buy a few things. You can get some deals and like mentioned some stuff can go for ridiculous prices. I dont have time to sit in front of the computer waiting for the auction to end. I just put in my max bid around the last day its offered. If I win it great, if not oh well another one will come along. Interesting concoction that bidnapper.

Offline Pathfinder

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Re: Bidding on eBay to win.
« Reply #4 on: October 03, 2009, 06:18:39 PM »
Long before the national chain of I sold it on eBay started, I ran a store in a small ND town and we did the eBay sales for townspeople. It worked really well, made a little money (kept the store afloat albeit a losing proposition all in all.

Lots of lessons learned, but mainly demand - make mandatory - postal insurance bought and paid for by the buyer. I had a couple of instances where the insurance saved me - and I suspect fraud by the buyer who demanded their money back for "damaged" good. Biggest case in point was a collector farm tractor ($175) made of resin. I shipped it in great condition (took pictures of it being wrapped in bubble pack before being put into a box with styrofoam popcorn), and they guy sent me an email complaining it was destroyed in shipping. He sent pictures of the tractor broken along component lines (treads, stack and front radiator) - not likely! I had him file a claim with the PO for the insurance.

Forgot about the pictures - if the piece is valuable, take photos before you send too. Set a limit for the insurance (e.g. anything over $50 must have insurance) and stand your ground. Good deals on eBay - fraudsters too.

Offline fritz_monroe

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Re: Bidding on eBay to win.
« Reply #5 on: October 03, 2009, 07:31:55 PM »
Great post.  Thanks for the tips.

Personally, I hate the automated bidding tools and hope that some day Ebay outlaws them.  I feel that if you really want an item, you need to take the time to try to win it.

As for bidding wars, they happen a lot.  It sure is nice to be on the receiving end of those wars.  I sold a school book for more than twice what I set as the buy it now price just because 2 people decided that they had to have it.  With shipping, the winner paid about $15 more than it would have cost them new.

Offline LdMorgan

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Re: Bidding on eBay to win.
« Reply #6 on: October 04, 2009, 03:47:16 PM »
Heheheheheh!

Been gone a while, and really enjoyed the posts here when I got back.

Right on target, every one.

I'm fixing to start a line of eBay auctions of DIY plans. Stuff I've designed over the years.

I need to make a little cash to accommodate my extravagant lifestyle. Jetting to Monaco, etc.

And to buy some chickens.

The main thing about bidding is to know exactly what you want, and what it's worth to you. Then you bid on that and nothing else, and you bid that much and no more.

Sometimes that takes a lot of discipline.

That's one reason I use the software to bid. It puts me out of the loop until the shooting's over.

(Sometimes, I get so excited!)

I (too) love it when a seller makes a mistake, or sells something good that happens to be "unpopular".

Or both--which is the very nexus of Opportunity with a capital "O".

I won an auction less than a year ago where I bought $2.000.00 worth of silver that no one else really wanted because it wasn't a popular "brand". When the package arrived, I opened it up and found out the sellers weren't very good at math.

There was just over $3000.00 worth of silver in the box, by weight.

Call it about $5.000.00 now. On paper, anyway.

I'd like to do that every day. At least once or twice.

(Oh, Yeah!)




Offline punjab

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Re: Bidding on eBay to win.
« Reply #7 on: October 04, 2009, 04:10:48 PM »
And you didn't return the overage to the seller?
Hops you never make a mistake in life and have someone hold you to the deal. ???

Offline LdMorgan

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Re: Bidding on eBay to win.
« Reply #8 on: October 04, 2009, 11:31:08 PM »
And you didn't return the overage to the seller?
Hops you never make a mistake in life and have someone hold you to the deal. ???



LOL. ROFL. SMTK. (Squirt Milk Thru Nose) WAT. (Wipe Away Tears.) DOIAOAT. (Do It All Over Again, Twice)

God, I love texting!

No, Punjab, I did not return the "overage" to the seller. Nor, in a case like that, would I.

Ever.

There was, and is, exactly zero reason for me to do so. Legal, ethical, or moral.

An auction is an auction, and you get what you pay for. If you buy a "trunk o' junk" and open it up and find a nice Rembrandt inside, you got yourself a real fine painting.

And it's yours because you bought it.

The courts have held many times over that auctions are final, except in the case of fraud, and then only to the benefit of the party defrauded.

Those guys made a $1,000.00 mistake in valuing their auction lot and didn't set a high reserve.

So, guess what?

The price they got was not only binding on them, it was fully acceptable to them.

They said X many spoons, knives. forks, etc--and that's exactly what they delivered.

Had they delivered fewer, I would have gone back to them demanding the rest of my property.

In fact, I have done that several times with various cheats that tried to "skim" the stuff they were auctioning.

You say you hope I never make a mistake in my life that costs me money because someone holds me to it.

I say if I ever make a mistake that costs me money I SHOULD be held to it!

A deal is a deal, and a man stands by his word. Period.

If it ever happens, I'll pay up with a smile and I won't whine about it later. I'll just be a lot more careful later.

True story: Some years ago a close friend of mine went to our local flea market. He found a used violin on a table for (I think it was) $40.00. It had a label in it that said "Stradivarius".

He decided the label was a fake, and passed it up.

The very next people to the table bought it and got a written receipt.

The genuine Stradivarius violin was later appraised at $80.000.00--and it was front page news, lemme tell ya!

And the flea market vendor had a fit.

He decided he was entitled to half the value of the violin, so he took the buyers to court.

The judge didn't quite throw him out the window along with his case. He didn't have a leg to stand on.

The man sold that violin for the price he wanted, and the buyers paid that price. It was no longer his property. End of story.

I predict, Punjab, that if you ever buy something that turns out to be MUCH more valuable than the seller believed it to be you will definitely not take it back and demand an instant refund.




Offline fritz_monroe

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Re: Bidding on eBay to win.
« Reply #9 on: October 05, 2009, 09:44:39 AM »
LdMorgan,
  I agree with you 100%.  If I make a mistake and it ends up costing me, I'll pay up.  I will complain about my stupidity, but the deal is made.  It's possible that I'd explain the situation to the buyer and hope they offer to split the difference, but if not, the deal will go through.

Offline punjab

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Re: Bidding on eBay to win.
« Reply #10 on: October 05, 2009, 10:41:12 AM »
ldmorgan

you can't predict what I would or wouldn't do in any situation.
My comment was more tongue in cheek than anything.
Your gleeful attitude at taking advantage on someone else rubbed me the wrong way.
PS-I have bought and sold a couple of things on auction sites and have seen it from both sides.
Good luck when you start tryng to sell on ebay.