Author Topic: diverticulitis  (Read 3806 times)

Offline gopack84

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diverticulitis
« on: September 15, 2014, 09:45:17 AM »
Short version -

Anyone have any first hand experience with getting doctors to really sit down and discuss alternatives and think about treating diverticulitis beyond saying "high fiber diet" and "surgery"?
Anyone have any first hand experience dealing with it long term? Things that have helped you? Things you think are pseudoscience junk? Things you tried that made no difference?

Wall of text version -

I've had a fun little exercise with diverticulitis since about 2010. But now twice in the last 9 months or so. Unfortunately, nobody around here will write a Rx without a CT scan. The impression I get is that they're either legitimately concerned or they are just CYA'ing (they all talk about protocols and patient care responsiblity, etc., etc.). So now I'm abut 8 days into a 10 day course of Cipro and Flagyl I don't know if I feel worse from the antibiotics or from the disease itself. I understand the structural part can't be fixed without surgery but that seems to be the only thing they're aiming at. Nobody cultures bacteria to see what bacteria is going nuts that causes the pain/inflammation. They just nuke the site from orbit (it's the only way to be sure) and then tell me to eat a high fiber diet, get the camera routine, and prepare for the knife. It's very frustrating. But since it seems to be happening more frequently, I gotta take charge and try to figure out alternatives. Loosing 8lbs in a week, and having the mere thought of eating make your stomach turn is not good. I have to force down enough food just to keep the antibiotics from making me more nauseous. And all of this spirals into a low activity lifestyle that doesn't help. On the bright side, in the past after the AB's are over, I tend to bounce back pretty quickly but the first 48 hours after onset of this crap is brutal.

Seems to me fermented foods would be a plus. And starting them soon after the antibiotic course is over would be smart. But I'm not a doctor. I don't know how much stock I put in probiotics but then again, I don't think it's likely to really hurt anything. Your stomach is a pretty intense environment to live through. The native gut fauna has to come from somewhere, right?

Anybody have any first hand experience with dealing with this nonsense long term? I realize I'm kind of in one of those no-win scenarios Jack talks about with chronic disease. In a true SHTF scenario, I'm probably screwed because this is a painful inconvenience in a world swimming in cheap antibiotics but it is potentially life ending without them. I figure the best bet is diet change but finding a doctor that wants to talk about anything other than AB's and surgery is extremely difficult. So I start to wonder if it's smart to consider surgery while I'm still young(not quite 50 yet), and the infrastructure is still completely intact, and I have insurance, etc. On the downside, gut surgery is not something I really take lightly although the surgeons seem to imply it's an easy one (yeah, and this computer never fails, and this car is the best car ever made, etc. say all salesmen...  ;))

I wonder what the best way to approach health care professionals is with this? They just seem to not want to really take time to discuss it. Anybody have any magic words you've used to get their diagnostic/troubleshooting juices flowing? I swear it's like dealing with L1 tech support trying to figure out why my internet connection is down. All they want to do is read a script. It's pretty frustrating. Thanks for letting me vent.
« Last Edit: September 15, 2014, 09:59:37 AM by gopack84 »

Offline bradleypaul75

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Re: diverticulitis
« Reply #1 on: September 15, 2014, 08:49:43 PM »
I dont have an answer but I feel for you, one of my close buddy's has the same thing and he is a preper too.

I will ask him if he has any advise.

Offline ShannonB

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Re: diverticulitis
« Reply #2 on: September 16, 2014, 06:59:12 PM »
We have been dealing with this for 14 years now. The hubby was diagnosed in 2000.

We spent all of spring break in the hospital this year. Their concern now is that the damaged portion may cause a preferation and require major surgery and possibly have him end up with a bag by the time he is 45.

How we as a family deal - he eats NOTHING with seeds in it. The problem is food getting stuck in the pockets, rotting and causing an infection. No strawberries, to tomatoes, no buns/bread with large grains, no chips. I cook high fiber meals as often as possible, he drinks at least a gallon of water a day. Takes a gummy fiber supplement and a probiotic daily. Stress is also a factor for him. NO BC powders which is his headache medicine of choice.

When he feels an episode coming on... And he can tell by now. He usually knows exactly what it was he ate, I scold him for eating it, he confesses it was a weakness, lol.  He takes a small laxative and flushes his system out with as much water as he can drink. Usually he is fine by the next day. If he is still having issues he takes a levaquin (?sp) for a couple of days and he is right as rain.

The trip is to keep EVERYTHING moving down there. Go regularly, do NOT let yourself get backed up. Water, water and more water.

Hope that helps. Good luck hon. I know for a wife's perspective how horrible it is. I have seen nothing bring a grown man to his knees crying like a really bad attack.

Offline gopack84

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Re: diverticulitis
« Reply #3 on: September 17, 2014, 07:57:51 AM »
Thanks for the replies folks. I'm feeling much better as usual but these chronic conditions are no fun to deal with for sure. It'll be interesting to see what the next 20 years holds for this. The onset seems to be creeping down in age from the research I'm doing. Probably related to our corrupted eating habits in the western world in general.

Offline danimal

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Re: diverticulitis
« Reply #4 on: September 17, 2014, 08:17:04 AM »
try lacto-fermentation which is well discussed here on the forums. Fiber and probiotics in one. And I have heard that this has way more "biotics" than the pills or yogurt.

Offline Fyrediver

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Re: diverticulitis
« Reply #5 on: September 18, 2014, 10:21:59 PM »
I've had diverticulitis for 8 years and averaged a flareup every 3-4 months usually resulting in a prescription once or twice a year.  I did get the surgery talk after a couple years of that.  Then I started drinking kefir. 

Since I started drinking kefir I've had a few very low level bouts of inflammation but nothing like I had in the past.  I've been drinking it for nearly 2 years and give it credit for keeping my insides inside!

I "grow" the kefir from a start that I got from my sister; I put raw sugar, organic molasses, and raw ginger slices into water with some kefir "grains" from the previous grow.  Two days later I've got another 2 qt batch and I start another one growing.  You can buy kefir starters from online businesses like this one:  http://bodyecology.com/digestive-health-kefir-starter.html  //no affiliation just an example//  I'm sure health food stores would be another source.

One of my co-workers got very sick with ulcers and his doctor recommended he drink kefir while he was recovering and during his antibiotic therapy. 

One must start slowly drinking kefir.  It's quite concentrated and drinking too much too soon will cause significant upset!  A little twice daily then slowly bring up your volume.  I drink a cup twice a day.  If I get an upset stomach I'll up the "dose" to fight whatever has invaded!  Then they dump the intruder straight into my colon!  (RIP George Carlin)  I also try to stick with a high fiber diet and supplement even that with Metamucil in addition to kefir.