Author Topic: Preparedness as a Retirement Plan  (Read 131426 times)

Offline kryptiea

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Re: Preparedness as a Retirement Plan
« Reply #90 on: August 10, 2010, 08:56:28 PM »
Im not ready to make the jump yet I have a lot of work to do but as of now I owe less than 3k on my house I have no credit card bills my truck is paid for. What Im thinking of doing once my house is paid off is getting continuing the expansion of my garden doing food preps and getting some wind and solar going once that is done semi-retiring.

Offline LvsChant

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Re: Preparedness as a Retirement Plan
« Reply #91 on: August 13, 2010, 08:08:53 AM »
kryptiea, that sounds so great! It all sounds like an excellent plan.

Offline maxhedroom

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Re: Preparedness as a Retirement Plan
« Reply #92 on: August 13, 2010, 07:27:29 PM »
Im not ready to make the jump yet I have a lot of work to do but as of now I owe less than 3k on my house I have no credit card bills my truck is paid for. What Im thinking of doing once my house is paid off is getting continuing the expansion of my garden doing food preps and getting some wind and solar going once that is done semi-retiring.

Good for you, I hope to be in your position soon!!

Offline dustyz

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Re: Preparedness as a Retirement Plan
« Reply #93 on: August 31, 2010, 06:59:16 AM »
Awesome thread/topic!

This is the type of thing that drove me to TSP. I was out searching for other people with a similar mindset... cause I wasn't having much luck locally.

I just turned 31... and my wife is in her 20's. We bought our house just before marriage 5 and a half years ago, and have been paying extra from the beginning. It will be paid off in under 3 years now, if the plan continues. In the mean time, we've been studying and learning new skillsets and prepping. How to garden, how to preserve, how to create power/heat/energy, how to harvest water and filter it... while getting our orchard & trees planted, maxing out our IRA & 401k retirement plans, & storing useful tools and materials. I figure if we minimize the need for money later, we minimize the amount of time we need to work @ a job. The less time we work at a job, the more time we can spend at home in the garden, with family, and living the simple/good life.

That's why this site is so valuable... it consolidates much of our beliefs. It's nice to see others on a similar path.

Offline Debra

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Re: Preparedness as a Retirement Plan
« Reply #94 on: September 10, 2010, 08:08:20 AM »
I recently discovered TSP, and this thread convinced me to join the forums. "Prepping for retirement" has been my goal for several years now, ever since I realized that financial independence, self-sufficiency, and homesteading form a truly comprehensive "preparedness plan": if you aren't dependent on an external job or external food supply, you can weather a lot of storms. Plus, you have the flexibility to do what you want to do, instead of what you have to do.  

I currently live in a medium-sized city, but have a 40-acre off-grid property about a few hours' drive away. I go up a couple times a month to work on it, carpooling with my boyfriend who owns the parcel next to mine (on a side note, we often download TSP shows and listen to them on the drive! :) ).  Over the years I've put in a well, a septic system, solar power, and just passed the rough-in inspection on my house.  The property will be paid off next year, I'll be debt-free in just over two years, and I'm building on the property as I can afford it. My goal is to semi-retire at age 50 (8 years), but I could move there sooner since I telecommute.

An additional perk is that when people ask about my property, I don't have to stumble around to avoid the "survival compound" label. I tell them "it's my retirement".  And they're jealous. :)
« Last Edit: September 10, 2010, 08:11:26 AM by DesertHomesteader »

Offline Cool Blue

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Re: Preparedness as a Retirement Plan
« Reply #95 on: September 10, 2010, 04:05:06 PM »
I recently discovered TSP, and this thread convinced me to join the forums. "Prepping for retirement" has been my goal for several years now, ever since I realized that financial independence, self-sufficiency, and homesteading form a truly comprehensive "preparedness plan": if you aren't dependent on an external job or external food supply, you can weather a lot of storms. Plus, you have the flexibility to do what you want to do, instead of what you have to do.  

I currently live in a medium-sized city, but have a 40-acre off-grid property about a few hours' drive away. I go up a couple times a month to work on it, carpooling with my boyfriend who owns the parcel next to mine (on a side note, we often download TSP shows and listen to them on the drive! :) ).  Over the years I've put in a well, a septic system, solar power, and just passed the rough-in inspection on my house.  The property will be paid off next year, I'll be debt-free in just over two years, and I'm building on the property as I can afford it. My goal is to semi-retire at age 50 (8 years), but I could move there sooner since I telecommute.

An additional perk is that when people ask about my property, I don't have to stumble around to avoid the "survival compound" label. I tell them "it's my retirement".  And they're jealous. :)

That's pretty awesome, I'm so jealous.

My plan is pretty similar to yours.  I'm also hoping to retire around 50 even though I'll take a hit on my pension.  With prepping you don't need as high an income so I probably won't notice the difference in income.

Offline ChEng

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Re: Preparedness as a Retirement Plan
« Reply #96 on: November 19, 2010, 02:39:50 PM »
I joined TSP about a month ago, after finding the thread What Did You Do Today To Prepare (http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=87.0).  I was hooked and spent many hours reading through that entire thread (all 260+ pages :o).

Now that I've gotten caught up in that thread, I've been looking around and found this thread.  The title piqued my interest and I started reading.  Well, I just about broke down and cried.  I am 50 and have taken the system's definition, swallowing it, hook, line, sinker, bobber, rod, reel, etc.>:(  I thought that the only way to retire was to have enough in "investments" that I could live off the interest returns for the rest of eternity - or at least until I died.  This thread does give me some hope, but I have thrown away a large chunk of my retirement preparations buying into that system.  I have not been able to put much into my retirement plans, and was getting worried.  I just never thought about preparedness as a retirement plan.

I am now looking into paying as hard as possible on my debt (mostly gone, thank God), getting a BOL/Homestead outside the city and moving out there within a few years.  I am also looking at cashing in my IRA and 401K for gold and silver, or maybe a "retirement property".  Still have some research to do on that stuff though.  Our youngest is still 15, and I would like to be moving shortly after he moves out.  That gives me between about four and six years or so to work on this. 

What I want is to be able to (before I turn 60 or 65):
- Produce 100% of my energy needs
- Produce 100%+ of my food needs (enough extra to tithe, give to family/friends/neighbors/needy and some extra to sell)
- Be totally debt-free. 
- Have enough in food storage that we can survive an extended period of poor health (although, cleaner living may eliminate this need, I still want the stores)

I am looking into a large garden and small orchard for much of my fruits and vegetables, a small aqua-ponics system to provide more veggies and fish (figuring probably channel cats at this time) and some small livestock (perhaps rabbits, chickens and maybe a couple of milk and meat goats - after a half-a-century of city-slicking, I'm not ready to start riding a horse and herding a hundred head of cattle ;)).  I will probably also try to get some extra meat through hunting, although historically I could be considered a vegetarian there (vegetarian - old Indian term meaning "lousy hunter"   :D)

I will work self-employed (along with the sales of some food items) for the little bit of money that I will need to spend on repairs and entertainments.

Still stuck deeply in the planning/research stages of this though.  Any thoughts?

Offline Cool Blue

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Re: Preparedness as a Retirement Plan
« Reply #97 on: November 19, 2010, 04:25:13 PM »
sounds great to me!

The only thing that would worry me a bit though is cashing out your 401k because I understand you take a big penalty for doing that (I'm Canadian so I'm not sure how it works).

Do you have any income besides your 401k that can provide for you when you reach retirement age?

IMO, although it might be a good good to produce 100% of your own food, I don't think it's realistic for most people, especially elderly people.

I'd like to be able to produce at least 25% of my own food eventually, maybe as much as 50%.  I'll need an income to make up the other 50%.

100% of your energy needs is quite possible however.

Do you plan on building a new home?  If so I'd recommend building very energy efficiently and no larger than what your minimum needs.  It's cheaper to conserve energy than create it.   


Offline LvsChant

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Re: Preparedness as a Retirement Plan
« Reply #98 on: November 19, 2010, 04:38:26 PM »
ChEng,

We share your pain. Rather late in the game we realized that we had been squandering a lot of our resources along the way. However, all is not lost. (We still have our health lol).

We are planning to move to an already purchased piece of land, build our own homestead and live on probably 1/3 the income to which we have grown accustomed. We are trying out the budget now (approx. 2 years before the plan goes live) to see if we can live within the income we'll have coming in... so far, so good, but it is a big difference. We are looking out for other income options as well as planning to downsize our expenses.

I'd be wary about cashing out the 401k's unless that is the only option... the penalties are quite high, from what I've heard. Besides, you aren't that far away from being able to access it without penalties, right? With the timeframe you have, you ought to be able to save a huge amount of cash by reducing the lifestyle expenses now. You can save the cash you'll need over the next few years if you put your mind to it. Another thing to consider, is that I think you may be able to access the 401k without penalty for things like your child's education expenses... (check it out, I'm no expert).

Offline CdnGuy

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Re: Preparedness as a Retirement Plan
« Reply #99 on: November 19, 2010, 04:45:44 PM »
ChEng,

You are obviously a smart, if not well educated, guy. You'll figure it out. It's all cost-to-benefit really. Just don't get stuck in the analysis paralysis.
I'm guessing you're an engineer yourself? Or at least a really technical guy? You might be surprised how well you could do going out on your own.

Just keep on trucking.

Offline ChEng

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Re: Preparedness as a Retirement Plan
« Reply #100 on: November 19, 2010, 05:51:03 PM »
The only thing that would worry me a bit though is cashing out your 401k because I understand you take a big penalty for doing that (I'm Canadian so I'm not sure how it works).

Do you have any income besides your 401k that can provide for you when you reach retirement age?
Cool Blue, Yeah, that could cause troubles - I know that I can swap it for gold, silver, real-estate with no tax penalty, looking into the rest.  My second oldest son is just about to graduate with his Accounting and Financial Planning degrees - he is being shanghaied into consulting for his Mom and Dad - he just hasn't heard about that yet.  ;)

IMO, although it might be a good good to produce 100% of your own food, I don't think it's realistic for most people, especially elderly people.

I'd like to be able to produce at least 25% of my own food eventually, maybe as much as 50%.  I'll need an income to make up the other 50%.

100% of your energy needs is quite possible however.
Those are the goals, right now.  Hopefully, I will be able to meet them, but if not, then part of my planning is to come up with Plan B ( and C and D and B.1, C.1, C.2, etc)  We'll see what happens.  Either way, my current investment is so low, that I would only be able to last about 6-12 months before they all go dry.   :'(

Do you plan on building a new home?  If so I'd recommend building very energy efficiently and no larger than what your minimum needs.  It's cheaper to conserve energy than create it.   
I keep wavering between building and buying and putting a mobile home up and parking an RV/Camper there.  A lot will depend on what I find as a BOL/Homestead.  One option that I am looking into is a buried/partially buried house - those can be pretty efficient.  Still looking (an droolin', an slobberin' an wishin'...)  I've got about 20-25 years of thinking and research behind me on this type stuff, and like I said - lots will depend on what I find.  One good thing is that the kids are now thinking about having a cabin on a vacation spot, where they can go to relax from society's stress and to use as a BOL.  We may use them to help fund a place and set up a couple of outbuildings/cottages around the main house for their families (properly stocked against SHTF situations, of course  :))

I'd be wary about cashing out the 401k's unless that is the only option... the penalties are quite high, from what I've heard. Besides, you aren't that far away from being able to access it without penalties, right? With the timeframe you have, you ought to be able to save a huge amount of cash by reducing the lifestyle expenses now. You can save the cash you'll need over the next few years if you put your mind to it. Another thing to consider, is that I think you may be able to access the 401k without penalty for things like your child's education expenses... (check it out, I'm no expert).
LvsChant, Yeah, you are right, things like that can lead to disaster.  I am studying on it now (see above about the forced slavery for my son :P)

ChEng,

You are obviously a smart, if not well educated, guy. You'll figure it out. It's all cost-to-benefit really. Just don't get stuck in the analysis paralysis.
I'm guessing you're an engineer yourself? Or at least a really technical guy? You might be surprised how well you could do going out on your own.

Just keep on trucking.

CdnGuy, Thanks, yes I am pretty educated.  Mostly self-study on this stuff.  And yes, I am an engineer.  In my post on the Intro thread, I mention that I am starting up a small business designing and selling kits and text material for engineering students.  (My business' tag line is "Helping to build a better engineer)  The kits are mostly electronic, control system and robotics.  One of the things that I am working on for the next five years (until our son, Peter, moves out) is to get my business rolling enough to allow me to drop out of the "rat race".  That should be enough time to either get enough into investments for me to retire or to be able to sell and set up another business that I can run from the boonies - or maybe continue with that if I can get close enough to a shipping organization that I can ship and receive.

The analysis paralysis is a definite potential problem for me.  I have been thinking about this and researching so much, that I have ton's (metric, even! :o) of information.  The real thing to do now is to work on getting my current house ready to sell, building up my business and then going shopping for a BOL/Homestead.  Gotta remember to keep on praying on this stuff - it keeps things in perspective.

Edited: Wow, did that get wordy!  See my Intro post about my Gift of Gab ;)
« Last Edit: November 19, 2010, 05:57:26 PM by ChEng »

Offline maxhedroom

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Re: Preparedness as a Retirement Plan
« Reply #101 on: November 19, 2010, 07:39:46 PM »
Still stuck deeply in the planning/research stages of this though.  Any thoughts?
 
One year ago we were in the same position, much desire and over 50. Well 1 year later credit card debt gone, car payment paid down to 6 monthe left, about 30 days worth of food, learned to can and dehydrate, had a 4 x 4 garden at our condo that produced some food. Started to build the 1st aid supplies, working on paying off and getting out of the condo. Yiou cant expect to buy yourself into this lifestyle it takes work small steps in the right direction within your means, to reach your goals. Being in yoyur 50's is hard having a teenager at homeis tough, my youngest is 16 so I relate. But this year has taught her lessons as well.

Teach yourself something, can you bake or make a lanyard from paracord, how about sharpen a knife, shoot a gun, fish? There is so much to learn. Winter is coming pick something and just do it, learn it and then do something else. This is my passion and I will keep doing it until I can't. Good luck and don't give up

Offline ChEng

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Re: Preparedness as a Retirement Plan
« Reply #102 on: November 19, 2010, 11:08:01 PM »
Still stuck deeply in the planning/research stages of this though.  Any thoughts?
 
One year ago we were in the same position, much desire and over 50. Well 1 year later credit card debt gone, car payment paid down to 6 monthe left, about 30 days worth of food, learned to can and dehydrate, had a 4 x 4 garden at our condo that produced some food. Started to build the 1st aid supplies, working on paying off and getting out of the condo. Yiou cant expect to buy yourself into this lifestyle it takes work small steps in the right direction within your means, to reach your goals. Being in yoyur 50's is hard having a teenager at homeis tough, my youngest is 16 so I relate. But this year has taught her lessons as well.

Teach yourself something, can you bake or make a lanyard from paracord, how about sharpen a knife, shoot a gun, fish? There is so much to learn. Winter is coming pick something and just do it, learn it and then do something else. This is my passion and I will keep doing it until I can't. Good luck and don't give up


Oh yeah, I'm not too shabby at cooking (unless you compare me to Mrs. ChEng - then I'm hopelessly lost, but then again so are most people  ;)).  I have been doing as you - we just paid off another debt and are now (after the holidays) going to roll that over to my student loan.  When that is paid off, they will roll over to the car payment and then the mortgage.  That is our last debt.

Like you said, pick a skill and learn - I was working on learning to make bannock.  This is a type of flat-bread with endless possibilities.  I was chronicalling it on the What Did You Do Today To Prepare thread, but ran out of flour.  We now have flour and I will get back to my experiments soon.  The shotgun is up at my son's, and I will probably bring it home this Thanksgiving - we are going up there for dinner.  I will also see if he has an old .22 or something that I can steal from him.  I used to be a pretty good shot (earned my marksman ribbon before getting out of the Air Force) and I will get back in shape there - also, my wife told me that I am to start taking the younger ones out to the range.  I told her that she is to join us and she said OK - she hasn't fired a weapon since basic training back in '79.

I am also stocking up (that will go with us whenever we move) on food supplies and other things, working on building up the EDC and the BOB and the First Aid Kits.  So, while it is mostly research and planning, there is still a large component of the practical to my preps.  Thanks for reminding me to stay practical, Max.

Offline 264Win

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Re: Preparedness as a Retirement Plan
« Reply #103 on: February 08, 2011, 08:46:48 PM »

  I was forced to retire due to a disability at work. I got my pension and a plus amount the equaled social security at age 55 and we made plans to move to Alaska. We were always preppers and if we had plans it was to work tilll 62 and get 42 years retirement instead of 30. But we can never plan for the unexpected, just be ready to change plans. We have a small garden and can salmon, and moose. We learned to live with life gave us and live comfortably. But if any one was to have told us we would be retiring at 55 I would have said they were crazy.

Offline Oakie

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Re: Preparedness as a Retirement Plan
« Reply #104 on: February 09, 2011, 05:57:36 PM »
 :)  Love reading everyone's stories!

I moved from Dallas, TX to an old house in the country 17 years ago and bought a small business in a small town.
I've had some wonderful successes gardening and some dismal failures but I've learned much.
The house was livable but I've spent years getting it in good repair.  I'm focused now on landscaping with food forests in mind.  Don't know how much of it will produce in my lifetime but I'm planting things for both long and short term production.  Time has always been an issue as I'm a single parent.  I'm hoping to work smarter instead of harder and although I cannot do an irrigation system I'm looking at other methods to hold water around plantings far from the house. (Burried hay and water pots?)  My main gardening will be done now in a raised bed just outside my kitchen door.  As I sit on a hill I hope to plant other things in swales below the raised bed. My traditional garden spot is lovely and may be used once again if I ever retire.    I suspect I may produce more in the raised beds with row covers and the convenience of tending things just outside my door.  Whatever comes this is fun and so much more so hearing your stories as well!

Offline CdnGuy

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Re: Preparedness as a Retirement Plan
« Reply #105 on: March 29, 2011, 10:39:48 PM »
My oh my time has flown since I first wrote this post. There is so much to share!

Since that time, I started my own website with a Canadian flavour on the topic of preparedness. It's been growing slowly, but that's also in direct proportion to the amount of time I've spent on it. I've been wrapped up in a project at work and my wife had started a new job that consumed just about every waking moment of her life. Seriously. She was managing a hotel. She had never managed a hotel, but within a year and half her hotel was named number 2 for that brand WORLDWIDE. You know this brand, so to make number 2 spot while being located in central Alberta is a HUGE success for anyone, let alone a newbie with no formal education. Then, someone somewhere up the line got a little upset that an unknown could do so well. Well, that all turned into a living hell!

Along the way, we took a trip to Nova Scotia for 6 days. First vacation either of us has had. We fell in love with the people and the place. My wife had been there several times when she used to be a long haul driver, and both of us had known many Maritimers throughout our lives so the reputation of their hospitality and such has always been with us.

Fueled by distaste for the increasingly bureaucratic ways and cut-throat business in Alberta, my sweetie started looking at properties down east. Our dream of having an acreage that we could 'retire' to in the preparedness lifestyle in Alberta had vanished, with even the most isolated acreages costing in the $400,000 and up range. Well, didn't she find 3 acres, with an old farmhouse and shop for $30,000.

After having a home inspector check it out and send us a highly detailed reports with tens of pages of pictures of everything he saw, we made the offer and bought it. Maybe not the smartest thing to do without having actually walked the land, but we felt confident in our home inspector and in the survey report that an old friend of mine, who lives down there, sent me.

The home inspector we ended up getting was the head of the home inspector's association for Nova Scotia. There was no one in our area, so he drove the 2 hours from Halifax to check it out for us. His final recommendation? If we don't buy it, he will.

We flew down on a Thursday evening to finish the paperwork and close the deal. We went to the house and toured it. The home inspection was exactly representative of what was there. Quickly, we winterized the home. Then we met the neighbours. Oh, the neighbours! You'll be relieved to know that people with good hearts who do the right things because it's the right thing to do, still exist. (Of course they do, most of you are those kind of people too!)

We had coffee with them and could have spent the whole night just visiting. They offered right out of the gate to keep an eye on our home for us. They told us of the wonderful old couple that used to live there and the history of the land. The neighbour did a lot of the work on that place and was very open with us. The more we heard, the more we knew that this place was for us out of something more like fate than just luck and some haphazard planning. This place was meant for us to retire to in 10 or 15 years.

Okay, my sweetie sped that up by about 10 or 15 years!! LOL! (I can laugh now that the panic attacks have stopped.) The hotel situation drove her to find another job. Another job in Nova Scotia! So, right now my sweetie, our daughter, and our dog are in the new-old home, peeling layers of wallpaper and planning the garden while I'm here in Central Alberta getting our house here ready to sell. It's listed now by the way.

Once this house sells, I'll honour my commitment to my employer, who is a good man of his word and a mentor to me, then I'll join my sweetie in our mortgage-free acreage in Nova Scotia. At that point, we won't owe anyone a dime.

True to our vision of preparedness as a retirement plan, we'll continue to work jobs, work on making the acreage as self-sufficient as we can, and enjoy the moments that we couldn't have in the rat race here. Don't get me wrong! Alberta has some of the best people you'll ever meet! It will always be the energy that drives Canada, and I don't just mean oil and gas! But we'll be able to enjoy the fruits of our labour and visit with neighbours, play cards, drink coffee and get back to building on the website I started more frequently like the good people of Canada deserve.

It's terrifying in many ways - such a large change in almost every aspect of my life. Yet it is also the beginning of the realization of our dreams and something I preached here a couple years ago now.

I hope this has been inspiring, or at least entertaining, to you in some way. I'd love to read how you are progressing on making preparedness your retirement plan.

Offline ModernSurvival

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Re: Preparedness as a Retirement Plan
« Reply #106 on: March 30, 2011, 07:25:44 AM »
I am going to read that update and another listeners story today on the air, today's topic will be, "Creating Your Vision of Freedom".  I wasn't sure what to do today but that just pushed it over the top.  I am SO happy for you brother!  You just got more than a decade of your life back, wow!  Terrifying, well when you let a caged bird go free it is terrifying at first too.
« Last Edit: March 30, 2011, 11:03:39 AM by ModernSurvival »

Offline Bad_Synergy

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Re: Preparedness as a Retirement Plan
« Reply #107 on: March 30, 2011, 10:45:47 AM »
CdnGuy,

What you are doing really is an inspiration!  +1

I have no doubt that everything will work out better than you could hope for.
Congratulations! 

Offline Cool Blue

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Re: Preparedness as a Retirement Plan
« Reply #108 on: March 30, 2011, 03:58:46 PM »
I'm so envious!  My wife won't move away from this area where 3 acres of raw land will cost around $60 000!  Congrats!

Offline Heavy G

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Re: Preparedness as a Retirement Plan
« Reply #109 on: March 30, 2011, 04:29:06 PM »
Nice to hear from you, CdnGuy.  I thought you were off the forum but I'm glad to hear things are going well.

Offline CdnGuy

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Re: Preparedness as a Retirement Plan
« Reply #110 on: March 30, 2011, 09:48:38 PM »
I am going to read that update and another listeners story today on the air, today's topic will be, "Creating Your Vision of Freedom".  I wasn't sure what to do today but that just pushed it over the top.  I am SO happy for you brother!  You just got more than a decade of your life back, wow!  Terrifying, well when you let a caged bird go free it is terrifying at first too.

Thank you Jack and HeavyG. You guys inspire me! Heck, my wife even listens to your show now. For some reason, she didn't like the way you sounded at first. But then you got the new microphone and such and she got past the Jersey/Texas/Penn accent and heard the heart of you and your message. I think she realized she was hearing a more advance version of me and now she just loves your show.

Whenever we had a few moments in the truck together, she'd actually ask if I had a new Survival Podcast. Heck yes!!!

It's funny, when I saw the title of the podcast and the show description, I thought, "Wow, huh, isn't that a coincidence that I just wrote an update about our journey last night. Cosmic consciousness at work!"

Jack, HeavyG, Sister, Bad_Synergy, etc...too many to mention. Thank you for all you do for all of us.

Offline LvsChant

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Re: Preparedness as a Retirement Plan
« Reply #111 on: March 30, 2011, 10:05:14 PM »
CdnGuy... I am so happy for you. My husband has about 13 months to go before he retires and he describes it as the feeling of knowing you are going to win the lottery. The anticipation!

It sounds like the two of you won the lottery, too. Best of luck to you.

Offline CdnGuy

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Re: Preparedness as a Retirement Plan
« Reply #112 on: March 30, 2011, 10:16:45 PM »
Okay, I just listened to the podcast and thank you for your encouragement! I really have to give about 90% of the credit to my sweetie. She did the footwork to find this place, I mostly provided the dreaming and kept going to work.

Yes, we will have no car payments, no mortgage, and no loans once the Alberta home is sold. The taxes - about $300 a year.

We have a good 5 years of work ahead of us to get the acreage to where we want it to be, in terms of production and style.

Now, here's the best part - how this is going to benefit our kids. Our daughter is 5'10" tall and an aggressive basketball player as well as an honour roll student. She is now attending a high school next to one of Canada's oldest and best universities. You can see where this is going, right? The opportunity for her to go to university and become a national level player has just increased by a magnitude! (She's actually my step-daughter, but that distinction doesn't matter.)

My son, who lives with his mom 10 months out of the year, will now be within a 16 hour drive instead of a 5 day drive. His ticket to fly to me drops from somewhere around $800 to about $180.

The oldest boy is in college here and living his own life. He's doing very well! I'm very glad for him, and proud of him. Should he decide to pursue graduate studies or just make a change in his life, well, there will be a launching pad for him in Nova Scotia.

Those three things are the real benefit. Family. That's what it's about.


Offline CdnGuy

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Re: Preparedness as a Retirement Plan
« Reply #113 on: March 30, 2011, 10:27:39 PM »
CdnGuy... I am so happy for you. My husband has about 13 months to go before he retires and he describes it as the feeling of knowing you are going to win the lottery. The anticipation!

It sounds like the two of you won the lottery, too. Best of luck to you.

Took me a while to realize that, but yes, it is like winning the lottery in many ways.

When my dad bought our first home for $100 down, and found that he could subdivide it into 3 lots, he told one of his co-workers that this was his winning lottery ticket. I didn't hear that story until a few months after my father passed away.

Well, I think this is our family's winning lottery ticket.

Offline Rookinde

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Re: Preparedness as a Retirement Plan
« Reply #114 on: April 01, 2011, 09:14:41 AM »
CdnGuy - Since your story was put out on the podcast it has help kick my family into high gear. My wife and I had our first meeting last night about where we are headed. We are going to have a planning/vision casting meeting again on Sunday. So thanks for share and let'ing Jack share on the show.

Rook

Offline Cool Blue

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Re: Preparedness as a Retirement Plan
« Reply #115 on: April 01, 2011, 06:02:31 PM »
CdnGuy - Since your story was put out on the podcast it has help kick my family into high gear. My wife and I had our first meeting last night about where we are headed. We are going to have a planning/vision casting meeting again on Sunday. So thanks for share and let'ing Jack share on the show.

Rook

Man, this is something I need to get my wife to do.  Any advice on how to approach it?  It seems like she doesn't want to face facts and just bury her head and keep spending money on junk to distract her from the problems.

The other night I asked her what her plan is and what she wants out of life, her reply was "I don't know."

Offline Nate

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Re: Preparedness as a Retirement Plan
« Reply #116 on: April 01, 2011, 07:44:02 PM »
I shared my vision with my wife today and we are on the same page!  Last week I accepted a new job in a totally new career field.  The job is in health care and the company is willing to train me.  There are endless opportunities to expand this new career.  So, my vision is as follows.  We are in our early 30's with no debt.  In the next 2 years we plan to buy a house in rural NW Ohio.  Fortunately this job is located in the town I grew up in.  Great place to start a family!  We want a rural home with a basement.  With this home I plan to have chickens and a larger more productive garden.  I also plan to find a mentor for hunting through the local sportsmans club.  This way I can procure most of our meat from wild game.  To supplement wild game I plan to buy a hog from a local farmer or meat market.  I plan to buy apples from a local orchard and make my own apple sauce and can peaches just like my parents did.  When our children are born, they will begin to learn how to thrive in a frugal household, and help us tend the garden and chickens.  They will also learn from me how to hunt and other "guy skills" and from my wife they will learn how to cook and speak Chinese and Malay.  I plan to further my new career by obtaining my RN thus earning more $$ and paying down our debt on the home we intend to buy.  I also plan to save for my children's college so when they graduate they have no debt.  My parents did the same for me and my grandparents did the same for them.   I believe with our current frugal lifestyle this vision is possible!

Offline Heavy G

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Re: Preparedness as a Retirement Plan
« Reply #117 on: April 01, 2011, 07:59:17 PM »
High five to you guys who are getting your wives on board.

There's a thread on this very topic: http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=3239.0

Offline CdnGuy

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Re: Preparedness as a Retirement Plan
« Reply #118 on: April 01, 2011, 08:22:59 PM »
CdnGuy - Since your story was put out on the podcast it has help kick my family into high gear. My wife and I had our first meeting last night about where we are headed. We are going to have a planning/vision casting meeting again on Sunday. So thanks for share and let'ing Jack share on the show.

Rook

Fantastic! I wish nothing but the best for your family. Jack is obviously a big inspiration as are all the other really cool people on this forum. One of my core beliefs is that my life should serve as an example to others, or at least as a warning. LOL!

Offline CdnGuy

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Re: Preparedness as a Retirement Plan
« Reply #119 on: April 01, 2011, 08:42:52 PM »
Man, this is something I need to get my wife to do.  Any advice on how to approach it?  It seems like she doesn't want to face facts and just bury her head and keep spending money on junk to distract her from the problems.

The other night I asked her what her plan is and what she wants out of life, her reply was "I don't know."

The thread that Heavy G mentioned is excellent. I think there was even a podcast episode awhile back that addressed getting reluctant spouses on board. Might be a good time for Jack to revisit that soon.

There really is no sound reasoning against incorporating preparedness into your life at least a little. We prepare by having insurance, wills, smoke detectors, etc. Just bump it up a little bit. Grow some counter-top herbs and then make her favourite dinner for her with them. Little stuff like that. Make sure her car is kitted out with roadside assistance stuff - it's a good way to show her you love her. If she thinks you're nuts, tell her that you'll do whatever it takes to be able to see her sweet smile every night. How do you argue against that?

Let me tell you a little story...
One day I was out shoveling the sidewalk, and I wanted to get it BARE. I hate snow on my sidewalk. Okay, I just hate snow. I chipped at the ice, I got a stable broom and swept the sidewalk. I think my sweetie thought I was nuts. Maybe I am. But then I told her about a neighbour I had when I was about 12.

This gentleman was a man's man and a very gentle man. Every time the snow fell, he was out there clearing his driveway and sidewalk just like I was doing now. No matter the time of winter his driveway was black and ice free and his sidewalk was clear with a few inches on either side. I thought he was just bored or obsessive. Then I asked him why he cleared his driveway and sidewalk so well.

He leaned on his shovel, cocked his winter hat up a bit so he could look right at me. With a serious face but soft eyes he said, "My wife is very ill and has been for a long time. If something should happen, I want the ambulance and medics to be able to get to her as quickly and safely as possible. I love her and I don't want to lose her because I didn't shovel the walk."

It hit me hard then as a 12-year old. It hit me harder as a man with a wonderful wife and family.

That last sentence can end with any number of things...
I love her and I don't want to lose her because I didn't have a first aid kit.
I love her and I don't want to lose her because I didn't have any savings.
I love her and I don't want to lose her because I didn't change the batteries in the smoke detector.
I love her and I don't want to lose her because I didn't do something to help in hard times.
And most importantly...
I love her and I don't want to lose her because I didn't tell her and show her I love her.