Author Topic: Cloth Diapering  (Read 4333 times)

Offline Herbal Prepper

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Cloth Diapering
« on: September 26, 2009, 11:14:38 AM »
Hi Ladies,
As part of our preps and money-saving efforts, we're switching over to cloth diapers.  I have a 19-month old son, and another baby on the way.  I've been ordering the one-size-fits-all diapers (with the snaps to adjust from newborn to toddler).  My son, Karl, is a LARGE boy.  He's never had a lot of baby fat, he's just very tall and solid for his age.  He's wearing 2T and even some 3T clothes.  I've been having trouble finding a diaper the can handle the amount of his naptime or overnight liquid output.  Otherwise, it's been pretty good.  So far I've tried the Fuzzi-Bunz pocket diaper, and the GroBaby diapers.  The Fuzzi Bunz are the biggest ones I've found so far, but the insert shifts a bit and can leak.  The GroBaby diapers I like better because they are made in the US and are chemical-free.  Fuzzi-Bunz was designed in the US, but are manufactured in China.  But, the GroBaby diapers are smaller than the Fuzzi-Bunz, and I only have one more snap I can adjust as he grows.  So, I don't think they will take him all the way to potty training.

Does anyone have any experience with cloth diapering and can give a recommendation for the most absorbant options?  I'd like to be able to say farewell to the disposables at nap time and overnight.  Also, does anyone have any recommendations for an extra large cloth diaper? 

These are the times I wish I knew how to sew.  I knit, I cross-stitch, but that's about where my needle skills end.  I can sew on a button, but it probably won't look very neat.

Thanks,
Cat

Offline homesteader

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Re: Cloth Diapering
« Reply #1 on: September 26, 2009, 12:16:34 PM »
I use the Fuzzi-Bunz on my almost 2 yr old and just add another insert to the diaper for naps and nighttime.  I found they are more prone to leaks with tighter clothing and have had to put her in larger sizes to accomedate the difference.  Happy Heinies is another one to try.  We have those for training pants for the older one, and they seem to do okay.  You do have to buy inserts seperately though.

If you're venturous enough to try making your own then you can get materials online.  Just make sure to get PUL fabric that is poly or cotton/poly blend and not just cotton-it will delaminate if it's just cotton.  The equipment they use to put the plastic snaps on the commercial ones is very expensive unless you decide to have a home business to recover your costs.  There are other kinds out there-all have their benefits and drawbacks.

Offline homesteader

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Re: Cloth Diapering
« Reply #2 on: September 26, 2009, 12:21:17 PM »
Btw: I didn't learn how to sew until I brought a machine home from a co-worker one day 9 yrs ago and my DH had to show me how to thread it!  If you get a cheap machine and go to the sewing classes at the sewing stores-you'd be surprised  at what you might learn. ;)

Offline Herbal Prepper

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Re: Cloth Diapering
« Reply #3 on: September 26, 2009, 02:10:34 PM »
Thanks Homesteader,  I'm going to get some additional inserts and give them another try during nap time, and I'm going to give a couple other brands a try too.  Learning to sew in on the ever-growing list.  I've been focusing on hand spinning, knitting, different types of knitting projects (everything from socks to sweaters to blankets, etc), gardening, canning, etc.  My hubby is a beekeeper, and we're going to be making candles for the winter with the wax from his hives soon.  Now, if I could just find another 10 hours to add to the day, I could get it all done.  :)

Cat

Offline EmmaPeel

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Re: Cloth Diapering
« Reply #4 on: September 28, 2009, 02:57:38 PM »
Look up knitting patterns for wool covers.  Wool covers work great and you can customize them so much.  Also, if I can find the link, I used a Canadian diaper that was absorbant, one-size, worked well with inserts and dried in one dryer cycle.  Bugaboo was 30 lbs before 3 months old so they handle bigger babies.  I will post if I find the link.

Here it is:

http://www.kidalog.net/product_info.php?cPath=21_23&products_id=43

I used these through two girls with wool covers and fleece covers.  Hemp is more absorbant than cotton so I used hemp inserts overnight.
« Last Edit: September 28, 2009, 03:01:08 PM by EmmaPeel »

Offline spartan

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Re: Cloth Diapering
« Reply #5 on: September 30, 2009, 08:34:13 AM »
We use Snug-to-Fit Supreme diapers with Thirsties covers and have been very happy.  My daughter is 15 months, 33" tall and 26lbs, and wears between 2-4T depending on the brand.  Though I have them let all the way out to full rise, which comes up to her navel, there is still plenty of room left around the waist.  They are large enough to handle plenty of wetness.  Adding a fleece insert keeps her separated from the wetness and fairly dry. 


Offline TexDaddy

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Re: Cloth Diapering
« Reply #6 on: September 30, 2009, 11:37:49 PM »
Out of curiosity, I have a couple of questions for the ladies who only use cloth diapers on their babies. First the setup.

When my first was born, my ex and I started out with cloth diapers. The little lad started to experience frequent diaper rash. Upon the suggestion of a friend, we tried Huggies disposable diapers. These diapers absorb an amazing amount of liquid. Even when heavy with liquid, the inner surface of the diaper is still dry, due to a one way barrier. This almost totally eliminated the rash problem. This was in a day when prepping was not part of my thinking. Still, since disposables are pretty affordable, when purchased in quantity from places like Costco, it was worth it to us. All 4 of my boys (2 with the ex and 2 with the current) went all the way to potty training in disposables after this.

The questions are, do the diapers you use keep your baby dry? Does your baby experience frequent rashes? I know you want the best for your child. I was wondering if the diapers have improved since my children needed them or if you use something else to help.

Offline soccer grannie

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Re: Cloth Diapering
« Reply #7 on: October 01, 2009, 06:58:51 AM »
Out of curiosity, I have a couple of questions for the ladies who only use cloth diapers on their babies. ... The questions are, do the diapers you use keep your baby dry? Does your baby experience frequent rashes?

Being the oldest in a family of 7 kids, I've changed quite a few cloth diapers -- nor were disposable diapers available when my kids were small.
1. Diaper rash can be caused by the detergent, bleach, fabric softener or dryer sheet used to launder the diapers
2. Be sure the baby drinks plenty of water
3. Using fabric softener or a dryer sheet decreases  the diaper's ability to absorb
4. The way you fold the diaper also increases/decreases the absorption (fold extra in front for boys, fold extra in back for girls)

Use a very mild detergent. I used Ivory Flakes -- don't know if that's still on the market.

Offline LvsChant

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Re: Cloth Diapering
« Reply #8 on: October 01, 2009, 07:10:27 AM »
We weren't prepping when my two were little guys, either. I was working at the time and my husband was Mr. Mom for a little while and he flatly refused to even try cloth diapers... so...

However, my Mom used cloth diapers when we were kids. Being the oldest, I changed many a cloth diaper in my growing up years. One crucial fact with cloth diapers is that you can't let the child stay in a wet diaper for long without changing or you will get the resulting diaper rash. With the new disposables, we have become very spoiled in that regard. Because of the nice barrier material that keeps the wetness away from the baby, we can wait quite a bit longer to change them...

I think ivory flakes are still available... and using hot water and bleach takes care of disinfection.

Offline EmmaPeel

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Re: Cloth Diapering
« Reply #9 on: October 01, 2009, 07:19:35 AM »
I agree with both posts, you must change regularly, more often than with disposables and detergent makes a huge difference.  I started with cloth because my oldest was allergic to the contents of the disposables and the wet wipes.  I stayed with them for my second because they aren't that hard and are sooo cheap. 

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Re: Cloth Diapering
« Reply #10 on: October 01, 2009, 09:10:13 PM »
From my experience with cloth diapers (in a child care facility not at home) I have found that cloth diapers tend to prevent diaper rash, as they are not full of harsh chemicals. The downside to them however is that they must be changed often or they will leak, where as with disposables they just get extra mushy.  I would suggest trying pre-fold cloth inserts, normally you can buy them in small, med, and large paired with a wrap or cover (I like bumkin but search for diaper cover and you will see lots of other options) I worked with cloth diapers on 8 children 5 days a week for over a year and while changing every 2-3 hours we did not have a problem with leaky diapers or "blow-out diapers".

Good luck with your search!




Offline homesteader

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Re: Cloth Diapering
« Reply #11 on: October 03, 2009, 04:33:31 PM »
Ditto what the previous posts said.  I used disposables on my first and am using an all-in-one diaper on my second.  The cost of the all-in-one was $320 for the set up vs. $1200 for one year of disposables.  I never worry of running out of diapers.  I just wash the dirty ones instead of running to the store and hoping they have some.  When we were snowed in for a few days with the power out-I just washed them in the utility sink(we have propane so we still had hot water) and hung them to dry. 

I actually have less of a problem with blowouts  on #2 than when I used disposables on #1.  It is the soaps that causes the rash, so if you find there is a problem of that, then rinse them a second time in hot water.

There are many all-in-one brands out there.  All have ups and downs and fit different on each kid. :)

Jennie_in_Iowa

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Re: Cloth Diapering
« Reply #12 on: October 19, 2009, 09:40:34 AM »
I'm using prefolds on my lad so I don't have much advice for a stash of One-size. Unless you want the advice of sell your one-size and redo your stash to prefolds with wool covers.  :D ;D
My stash is half good quality prefolds (not the kind bought at Walmart) and half homemade prefolds sewn with organic bamboo velour/hemp terry.  I can't rave enough about making your own, you can tailor the absorbency and fit to your little one. Because really, how often is the claim "one-size" really true?  And prefolds are just squares, so there's nothing easier to sew.

My latest batch of home-mades.http://myfreedompath.blogspot.com/2009/10/handmade-baby-continues-to-grow.html

I'd be willing to trade some diaper sewing if you wanted to trade your knitting services.  Have you ever been to Diaperswappers.com? Check it out. Everything you've ever wanted to know about cloth diapers.  I'm on those forums with the same name I have here.

TexDaddy: you do have to change them more often, anything that makes a 'sposable sag would be too much for most cloth diapers.  We change every 2 hours unless he poos and I hear it. Then at night I have the homemade thick diapers that handle about 6 hours. He's 6months+ and we have had only one instance of diaper rash.
« Last Edit: October 19, 2009, 09:44:21 AM by Jennie_in_Iowa »

Offline livingmydream

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Re: Cloth Diapering
« Reply #13 on: December 16, 2009, 03:26:05 PM »
Love cloth diapering! If we have another I might get into prefolds and covers because they are cheaper. But I have a good stash built up of Fuzzi Buns, Happy Heiny's and Bum Genius. They are all very absorbent. I have noticed the older they are the more absorbent they become! I usually double up on the inserts at nap or bed time so they don't leak.
About the rashes, ditto the above posts. Using the wrong detegents can cause build up. They get stinky and smell like amonia. This can also burn baby's bottoms. As soon as they start smelling funky you will need to strip them. I rarely have to srip mine, but that does help. They save so much money and are safer for baby. And I love that they are reusable. I couldn't imagine having to store so many huge packs of diapers!!!

Offline Herbal Prepper

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Re: Cloth Diapering
« Reply #14 on: December 16, 2009, 04:08:42 PM »
I'm using prefolds on my lad so I don't have much advice for a stash of One-size. Unless you want the advice of sell your one-size and redo your stash to prefolds with wool covers.  :D ;D
My stash is half good quality prefolds (not the kind bought at Walmart) and half homemade prefolds sewn with organic bamboo velour/hemp terry.  I can't rave enough about making your own, you can tailor the absorbency and fit to your little one. Because really, how often is the claim "one-size" really true?  And prefolds are just squares, so there's nothing easier to sew.

My latest batch of home-mades.http://myfreedompath.blogspot.com/2009/10/handmade-baby-continues-to-grow.html

I'd be willing to trade some diaper sewing if you wanted to trade your knitting services.  Have you ever been to Diaperswappers.com? Check it out. Everything you've ever wanted to know about cloth diapers.  I'm on those forums with the same name I have here.

TexDaddy: you do have to change them more often, anything that makes a 'sposable sag would be too much for most cloth diapers.  We change every 2 hours unless he poos and I hear it. Then at night I have the homemade thick diapers that handle about 6 hours. He's 6months+ and we have had only one instance of diaper rash.



Jennie, sorry, I've been without reliable internet access for a little over 6 week, and am just now reading this post.  I haven't been to diaperswapper, but will check it out.  I'd love to trade on services.  Just need to investigate a little on line to find a good pattern and the appropriate wool product.

amanadoo

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Re: Cloth Diapering
« Reply #15 on: December 17, 2009, 12:37:27 PM »
I'm another who uses prefolds and wool covers. I only use the largest size (toddler size) and fold them accordingly for the different boys. Lately, when I can be sure we aren't going to have a "number 2" situation, I've been using some old receiving blankets like a flat diaper. Because they dry so quickly (I do not have a dryer), using them is a boon and can save me quite a bit of laundry. But, like I said, I wouldn't want to clean anything other than pee pee out of a thin flat fold diaper.

PinkCoyote

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Re: Cloth Diapering
« Reply #16 on: December 22, 2009, 11:36:18 AM »
Out of curiosity, I have a couple of questions for the ladies who only use cloth diapers on their babies. First the setup.

>>We had the same problem.  We spent quite a bit of money buying and trying various cloth diapers. It seemed to get them to work, we had to constantly change them and only had success keeping leaks in using plastic/nylon covers which, sadly, lead to a lot of diaper rashes.

 I think if I ordered cloth diapers today, I'd test them out by washing and drying the new diaper.  Then I would wet the diaper with water, wrap it around  my hand and see how it feels.  If my hand felt wet, no doubt my baby's delicate skin would feel wet and his delicate skin would be resting against urine and worse!  Afterall, I want my babies to be comfortable. A cloth diaper that keeps bottoms dry and rash free would be wonderful!

Daphne4Mitchell

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Re: Cloth Diapering
« Reply #17 on: December 24, 2009, 10:33:57 PM »
Howdy!

There's a great page with links to free cloth diaper patterns at http://www.zany-zebra.com/free-cloth-diaper-patterns.shtml.

In addition, there's a Yahoo Group dedicated to people who knit wool soakers for use with cloth diapers. http://groups.yahoo.com/group/wool_soaker_group/?yguid=95621421

We had a system worked out for cloth diapering when my daughter was small, back when dinosaurs ruled the earth. We used a fitted cotton flannel diaper and simply used all cotton, white fingertip towels for the inserts. These worked really well and dried more quickly when washed than sewn inserts. On the changing table at one end I had one of those pump pots that people sometimes use for coffee (thermal, larger than a carafe), and a stack of clean baby washcloths. Down on the floor was a diaper pail which we kept half filled with very warm water and 1/2 cup of borax mixed in. The diapers, liners, and diaper covers/soakers were stacked on the center shelf of the changing table.

So, each morning I would fill up the pump pot with very warm water and put it in its place. When the munchkin needed a change, I would plunk her down on the changing pad, turn the pump pot to open, squirt warm water on a baby washcloth or three (depending on how bad it was), open up the diaper area, take the dirty diaper and put it in the diaper pail solution (unless it was poopy enough to need a trip to the toilet first), then wipe her off with the warm washcloths, which also went directly into the diaper pail as I put the new clean diaper on and secured the diaper cover.

Voila! Clean, neat, rashless, and stench-free child.

Putting a couple of mirror tiles on the ceiling above ensured she would be occupied watching herself during the change and so cause less trouble.

Once a day I would drain the diaper pail solution into the toilet, then run that load of diapers by itself, with more borax in the washload (we did use Ivory Flakes, which I don't think is available any more) and vinegar added to the last rinse.

Hope this helps. It really was easier to do it this way than to have to deal with going to the store and buying disposables.