Author Topic: Are Hornets good for anything?  (Read 4365 times)

Offline Radjoman

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Are Hornets good for anything?
« on: October 13, 2009, 07:28:50 PM »
Do they make Honey? polenate crops?  I destroyed a nest at my mailbox recently and have a little remorse. But they were a danger to kids walking home from school. the mailman, etc. These are the black and white striped ones that make the big paper nests.

Offline Stinkie Archer

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Re: Are Hornets good for anything?
« Reply #1 on: October 13, 2009, 10:02:42 PM »
Do they make Honey? polenate crops?  I destroyed a nest at my mailbox recently and have a little remorse. But they were a danger to kids walking home from school. the mailman, etc. These are the black and white striped ones that make the big paper nests.
Chicken feed. Fish bait when frozen. Their only use is that they eat other bugs. But I don't think they pollinate anything and they sure don't make honey. They kill honey bees and steal honey yes...


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Hare of Caerbannog

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Re: Are Hornets good for anything?
« Reply #2 on: October 13, 2009, 10:15:00 PM »
Some types are vicious predators.
They go after the nasty bugs that attack the garden.
The hated yellow jacket, for example, is a great predator for the garden. I have a couple nests in and around my garden.
The silly little boogers get the twisted impression that they own the garden.
I give them space and back off when they come out. If they get too bad I'll take them out.
But for the moment, they help keep my garden free of the nasty bugs.


Disclosure: I have no bee allergies and sometimes they get me. It burns like crazy for about 5 minutes and then itches for about a day, but its no big deal.

sarahluker

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Re: Are Hornets good for anything?
« Reply #3 on: October 13, 2009, 10:20:37 PM »
They also eat flies.  I do like that. 

Offline Radjoman

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Re: Are Hornets good for anything?
« Reply #4 on: October 15, 2009, 02:09:32 AM »
OK welll I guess I'll leave the other one in my yard alone, its up high and not in anyones way. I remember getting stung by one once. I saw it come out of a crack in the house siding 20 ft away and fly directly to my arm to sting me. Hurt like crazy and then I got a bad reaction. I dont like em a bit.
Thanks

Offline cohutt

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Re: Are Hornets good for anything?
« Reply #5 on: October 15, 2009, 05:39:52 AM »
they are predators and serve their purpose. if the nest is out of the way it stays.


Offline LvsChant

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Re: Are Hornets good for anything?
« Reply #6 on: October 15, 2009, 09:16:50 AM »
OK welll I guess I'll leave the other one in my yard alone, its up high and not in anyones way. I remember getting stung by one once. I saw it come out of a crack in the house siding 20 ft away and fly directly to my arm to sting me. Hurt like crazy and then I got a bad reaction. I dont like em a bit.
Thanks

If you had a reaction to a sting, you might want to reconsider leaving the nest there. The reaction next time you get stung could be far worse. You may want to investigate whether or not your doc thinks you should keep an epi-pen.

One of my sons was stung several times when we lived in wasp heaven (north Louisiana). The first three or four stings he didn't have much if any reaction at all. Then he got a sting that swelled up and took a long while to heal... the next time after that he was stung on the back of his neck... swelled up hugely... had to use medication to attack the swelling and a secondary infection. At that point, the doc prescribed an epi-pen for him. We are going to an allergist to see if desensitization for him would be possible. I see the need for an epi-pen as a serious danger to him in his life.

Offline cohutt

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Re: Are Hornets good for anything?
« Reply #7 on: October 15, 2009, 06:12:05 PM »
True hornets, the euro bald faced hornets that build nests like the one below (that I knocked down in one piece by accident on my tractor), hurt a hell of a lot more and longer than yellow jackets (ground nests) or the wasps that have the open honeycomb nests up inside of porch eaves etc.

I'm not allergic - been stung hundred times or more by the collective bunch - but I do have different reactions to hornet stings.  If i get stung by a yellow jacket it like a Novocaine shot except it takes 10 minutes to stop stinging and go numb. 
Funny thing is if I've been stung by a hornet anytime in the previous few months, the yellow jacket sting makes the old hornet sting flush up and itch some too.

Hare of Caerbannog

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Re: Are Hornets good for anything?
« Reply #8 on: October 15, 2009, 06:23:40 PM »
I should add to my post above that if I or any of my family had allergies to bees I wouldn't take a chance. I would get rid of them.

cohutt your story reminded me of being stung by something the locals around Reno NV call a "Meat Bee". I got stung by one on the back of my right knee the first day we arrived as I was climbing out of the moving truck.
About 6 months later I got stung by one on the front of the left lag and the old spot started burning.
I thought it was all in my mind so I didn't tell anyone.

Offline kiteflyer

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Re: Are Hornets good for anything?
« Reply #9 on: October 15, 2009, 08:10:23 PM »

   Saw a movie once with John Wayne in it and some rebels threw a nest of hornets in aTrain Car and it sure did get rid of those Yankees out of there to get the gold! What kind of warfare was that? Good old southern kind! ;D They put grease fat on the tracks to stop the train too! Well that's something!

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Hare of Caerbannog

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Re: Are Hornets good for anything?
« Reply #10 on: October 15, 2009, 08:18:21 PM »
   Saw a movie once with John Wayne in it and some rebels threw a nest of hornets in aTrain Car and it sure did get rid of those Yankees out of there to get the gold! What kind of warfare was that? Good old southern kind! ;D They put grease fat on the tracks to stop the train too! Well that's something!

            kiteflyer

LOL
I remember that movie!

Offline Orionblade

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Re: Are Hornets good for anything?
« Reply #11 on: October 19, 2009, 02:50:25 AM »
They excell at point defense.

Honeybees are better since they'll recognize you.

Get a hive, plant a sh** ton of mint/peppermint/spearmint/lemon balm and they'll go to town with nary a sign of a mite.

Just watch out for wax moths. Grrrr. I plan on outfitting a few of my bees with twin browning M2 machine guns chambered in the new round from Hymenopterid Metal Cartridge Company, the .5 mm ORM (Orion Rimfire Magnum).

I have a great deal of respect for virtually all Hymenoptera, and they tend to be a deterrent to baddies of the any legged variety.
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Offline LvsChant

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Re: Are Hornets good for anything?
« Reply #12 on: October 19, 2009, 09:42:28 AM »
If you had a reaction to a sting, you might want to reconsider leaving the nest there. The reaction next time you get stung could be far worse. You may want to investigate whether or not your doc thinks you should keep an epi-pen.

One of my sons was stung several times when we lived in wasp heaven (north Louisiana). The first three or four stings he didn't have much if any reaction at all. Then he got a sting that swelled up and took a long while to heal... the next time after that he was stung on the back of his neck... swelled up hugely... had to use medication to attack the swelling and a secondary infection. At that point, the doc prescribed an epi-pen for him. We are going to an allergist to see if desensitization for him would be possible. I see the need for an epi-pen as a serious danger to him in his life.

Follow up... took the boy to the allergist... he said that what my son had was a severe local reaction -- not a reaction that would be life-threatening (i.e. anaphilactic (sp?) shock, trouble breathing, hives, vomiting, etc.). He told us our son is no more prone to having a need for an epi-pen than anyone else. No desensitization needed... no need to carry an epi-pen for the rest of his life.

Great news... and also very enlightening. He did mention that he thinks that the entire population is helped when more people do carry epi-pens, however. He said most people never know they will have a life-threatening reaction until it happens the first time. He also said that he would have prescribed a steroid to tackle the severe local reaction, rather than the meds our doc prescribed. More life information to carry forward.

Offline Orionblade

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Re: Are Hornets good for anything?
« Reply #13 on: October 19, 2009, 12:50:17 PM »
Nice.

Glad he's OK.

It's worth a shot to keep an eye out the next time he gets stung - I have a friend who reacted mildly the first time she was stung, went into respiratory failure the second time. She's now had a primary and secondary immune response to the venom protien. I could go into the biology of it, but in essence the initial response is a few cells saying "aww hell, something's here that shouldn't be" and the secondary response is "aww hell, it's back, call the national guard!". In between the two responses you have what amounts to an APB being distributed throughout your immune system, so the second ONE cell responds to ONE antigen, *poof*, it's all out thermonuclear war against the invading party.

This is part of why H1N1 and H5N1 are so deadly - the thing that kills you is the off chance of a cytokine storm. Your immune system goes ape sh** and fries/pickles/fricasees your internal organs.

I always keep benadryl and some topical steroids around as they can buy you time to get to a hospital. Epi pens are great and should be part of any kit belonging to someone who doesn't know about their bee sting reaction status, or if you intend on being able to help out others at events and such. In a non bugout situation, my BOB goes with me all kinds of places, including the range, since I have all my junk with me, I could help someone out that got injured. Even if a folding stock just breaks and busts an upper lip, it's nice to stop the bleeding long enough to get someone to the ER.

Thanks for the reminder to get a fresh epi pen along with my suture kits!
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Offline Jimbo

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Re: Are Hornets good for anything?
« Reply #14 on: November 07, 2009, 05:47:59 AM »
 I think I heard somewhere their stings can be a relief for arthritis, but OUCH! :o
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sarahluker

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Re: Are Hornets good for anything?
« Reply #15 on: November 07, 2009, 08:21:21 AM »
There was a lady in Alvin, Tx, a town near us, who was mowing and was severely attacked by killer bees.  She almost died and was in the hospital for a while.  The upside to all of this is, she had really bad arthritis and it was gone after she recovered.  True story, I promise!

Offline Orionblade

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Re: Are Hornets good for anything?
« Reply #16 on: November 07, 2009, 10:32:26 AM »
I'd stick to standard bee sting therapy. Virtually all hymenopterids have the same sort of sting composition, and IIRC, it's competitive antagonism for the antibodies that cause arthritis.

Interesting anecdote, and lucky her!
You can't run away on a world that's round.
You're only comin' back to where you'll be found.

Based on thorough experiments involving kissing in the rain, exposing shoulders to direct sunlight, and dancing by the light of a silvery moon,  I have found that, within the bounds of frostbite and decency, hapiness is inversely proportional to the amount of clothing worn.

Offline Sister Wolf

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Re: Are Hornets good for anything?
« Reply #17 on: November 08, 2009, 03:32:04 PM »
Actually, aren't hornets (and wasps) also detritus eaters?  They help get rid of rotting veggies and fruits - I THINK.  That's on top of their predator thing.

I'm not sure that's true, but I think it might be.


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Hare of Caerbannog

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Re: Are Hornets good for anything?
« Reply #18 on: November 08, 2009, 05:40:46 PM »
Actually, aren't hornets (and wasps) also detritus eaters?  They help get rid of rotting veggies and fruits - I THINK.  That's on top of their predator thing.

I'm not sure that's true, but I think it might be.
Yes.
They loved my compost pile this year when I packed it with melon rinds.
And they love old apples.