Author Topic: Grain for Food?  (Read 2107 times)

Offline pokeshell

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Grain for Food?
« on: October 20, 2012, 06:31:09 PM »
Can I use the grain I buy in the 50 lbs sack to make bread? Can that be the only grain I use? I have an older version of this grain mill, can that be used to mill the grain, or do I need to go further? I can make it pretty dang close to what "whole wheat flower" in the bag for the bread maker looks like.

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Offline fratermus

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Re: Grain for Food?
« Reply #1 on: October 20, 2012, 09:46:27 PM »
What grain are you buying in 50# sacks?
What kind of bread do you intend to bake?
What is "this grain mill"?

Offline fritz_monroe

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Re: Grain for Food?
« Reply #2 on: October 21, 2012, 07:01:37 AM »
Yep, need more information.

But whatever you are buying, you will want to make sure that if it is intended for animal feed that you know what you are getting.  You will likely have to remove additional chaff.  It could also have vitamins or other additions to the grain.

Offline Moonvalleyprepper

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Re: Grain for Food?
« Reply #3 on: October 26, 2012, 06:57:36 AM »
If your asking if you can use malt to make bread I have no idea. My gut tells me that the malting proccess might alter the grain to not preform like unmalted grain in a bread recipe. You could always try it and find out.

I do know that you can use spent grain mixed in with a bread recipe and get good results. I've made things like dog treats, bread sticks, bread bowls, deer feed piles <--  ;D with my spent grain.

Offline pokeshell

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Re: Grain for Food?
« Reply #4 on: October 28, 2012, 01:58:39 AM »
It is the 50 pounds sacks of grain from midwest brewing I think it is 2 row. I brew "all grain" only, no extract.

The mill is very similar to this: http://www.midwestsupplies.com/schmidling-permanent-roller-maltmill.html I can adjust it so it mashes up the grain pretty powdery.

I am not sure what happened to the links on the last post, it was on one of the days the site was having issues.

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Offline fratermus

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Re: Grain for Food?
« Reply #5 on: October 28, 2012, 02:20:30 AM »
I would be surprised if you could make anything resembling normal bread using 100%  barley;  malted barley might even be more problematic.  And think of all the hulls -- might be like eating a duraflame log.  :-)

Some ideas:
Maybe try mixing in 5-10% ground malt in place of a like amount of wheat flour in your normal bread recipe and see what happens.  This should have enough gluten to hold the rise and the hulls should increase roughage noticeably.  Go from there.  Cheap experimentation. 

Do a small, thick tabletop mash and use the sweet wort in place of water in your normal recipe. 

Grind a small handful of malt and toss in when the breadmaker asks for "additions".  Presoak and pat dry first to keep from throwing off moisture conent?

If having dual-purpose grain stores is a compelling interest for you, perhaps cultivating a taste for weizen and other wheat beers would require having a bag of wheat around.  I don't think any wheat is ideal for both breadmaking and brewing but others may chime in. 

Offline sbd2112

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Re: Grain for Food?
« Reply #6 on: November 13, 2012, 07:37:09 AM »
I make hard tack with the spent grain..lots of reciepes for hard tack on the internet..just add in a cup of the spent grain...they last forever if stored correctly and taste pretty good..just dont break any teeth when biting into them.