The Survival Podcast Forum

Survivalism & Self Sufficiency Topics => Homesteading and Self Reliant Living => Home And Business Security => Topic started by: HumeMan on January 29, 2010, 07:10:26 PM

Title: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: HumeMan on January 29, 2010, 07:10:26 PM
23 Things REAL Burglars Know, But That You Don’t Think About

Do they really think I would not look in the lingerie drawer? Always check the bedside table, the medicine cabinet, and dresser drawers first. I found a stun gun in a drawer once. I guess they just did not take it with them.

A loud TV or radio can keep me away better than a good home alarm system. But some are unwilling to leave anything on while they are out of town, even when they can buy cheap devices like motion detectors with sirens and things that work on a timer that looks like someone is really there.

Never waste your time by going into kids' rooms. There is nothing but toys in there. They would never hide valuables in a child's room.

If they have decorative glass at the front entrance, see if they let the alarm company install the control panel where you can see it.

You can also spot a motion detector if it is near the entrance. Do they really think I cannot see the blinking armed light through glass?

Hey, in my neighborhood they will let me use the bathroom while I am working in their yard, so I can unlatch the back window to make it easy for me to get in when I come back. I can also look around for a surveillance camera in the area.

There is not enough time to break into that safe where their valuables are but if it's not bolted down, you can just take it with you.

Look in the windows. I look for signs that they could be home, and for an expensive TV or for a cabinet with china or silver. Even those fake surveillance cameras fool me. I can't tell the dummy cams from the real cams.

Drive at a normal speed through the neighborhood at night, before they close the blinds. You can just to pick your targets.

Do not be surprised if they pay loads of money for an expensive alarm system and walk right out of the house without setting it.

Always knock first. If they answer, just ask for directions somewhere or offer to mow their lawn. Carry a clipboard. If they answer be sure to check to see if they have any pepper spray in their hand or on a nearby table.

Sometimes, you can dress like a salesman and carry a couple of bottles that you bought at the dollar store. But you never, ever should look like a burglar.

Check on MySpace or Facebook because some of them will announce their vacation on their page. The kids are always bragging about the vacation.

I leave immediately if you see loud dogs or nosy neighbors. They will get you caught every time. At night I take pepper spray with me in case a dog chases me.

Break a window to get in, even if it makes a little noise. If the neighbor hears one loud sound, he'll listen and wait to hear it again. Don't worry; he won't check it out if he doesn't hear it again.

If they don't answer when I knock, sometimes I get lucky and walk right in when I try the door.

I always check windows to see if they are open just a crack during the day for a way to let in a little fresh air. It is easy to get inside from there.

Look around the outside of the house for nice manicured lawns or pretty flower beds. That tells you they have style... And that means there are expensive things inside.

If the car is left out in the driveway, walk buy and touch the hood. If it is warm, someone is at home they still may be awake. Just move on.

Those skate boards and toys their children haphazardly leave outside means they may have a nice computer or game system.

You really should look for newspapers piled up on the lawn.

Use the computer to generate and leave a pizza flyer on their door to see how long it takes them to remove it.

If it snows look for car and foot tracks in the drive or on the walk. If there are none after a couple of days they may be on vacation. You can come back during the night.
Title: Re: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: Serellan on January 29, 2010, 11:58:51 PM
Great post!  Good things to think about!
Title: Re: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: spisblog on January 30, 2010, 07:42:27 AM
I remember reading a police blotter a while back where thieves would take garage door openers from cars parked in driveways at night. They would then use them later during the daytime when the homeowners were at work.

Most people don't know how to change their garage door codes.  That's one of the first things I do when moving to a new house.

Also, Be sure to use the electronic lock on the garage door opener at night and lock the door between the house and garage.
Title: Re: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: fndrbndr on January 30, 2010, 08:18:23 AM
Wow...where did this come from, an actual burglar? Interesting to see things from the other perspective.
Title: Re: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: Hare of Caerbannog on January 30, 2010, 08:27:15 AM
Good stuff here.
+1 from me HumeMan

I have several relatives that have spent a considerable amount of time locked up in federal prisons and state prisons in California, Missouri, and Kansas.
They all have a similar story.
A standard technique that is commonly discussed in prison is to find a skinny late teenage boy and send him through a neighborhood with a box of oversized candy bars, a sad story, and a clipboard with each address listed.
The kid is trained to look for some of the very things HumeMan  listed.
When someone answers the door he grades the house and its occupants.
This saves the burglar a lot of time and can keep him from entering the wrong house.
Whenever an older kid comes to my door I always ask about school. Teacher names, principal's name, do you know so-and-so, etc.
Title: Re: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: IowaFreak on January 30, 2010, 12:37:26 PM
Great post Hume!

A couple of years ago there was a show on called "It takes a Thief" it really opened my eyes to how unnoticeable a burglar could be, and how quick they could be in and out with everything of value.
Title: Re: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: IowaFreak on January 30, 2010, 12:41:58 PM
I guess the show is still on "Find out on It Takes a Thief on Discovery Channel, weekdays at 6 p.m. ET/PT"

I thought they had cancelled it.
Title: Re: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: spisblog on January 30, 2010, 02:29:36 PM
There's a lot of good info regarding home security- both awareness/processes and devices/hardware, on that show.

One of the shows highlighted some 3M window film that helps make glass practically shatterproof.  It's basically a really strong laminate, like a car windshield has.  That was cool stuff!  That would be good for patio doors and basement windows.

I have Gila window film on some windows (for UV and solar radiation reflection) which I think provide some of those benefits but for a fraction of the cost. 

I'll don't know for sure because I'm not going to take a baseball bat to my windows ;)

Plus there's a tax rebate for it, since it saves energy.  It's easy to install and really does made a difference when the sun is beating down.  I'm using the 70% film.  When there's light outside it's reflective so people can't see in.

Title: Re: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: fndrbndr on January 30, 2010, 02:38:26 PM
Anyone ever been burglarized before? That's one of the things I'm thinking about for when we move out to the country.

About 10 years ago, we lived in South Louisiana in a mobile home out in the country. It was relatively secluded, and some ass clown broke in while we were away. He took my Mossberg 590, our fireproof safe, all our CDs, our microwave and our stereo. Just cherry picked all of our stuff. I remember feeling really vulnerable and violated. I also felt stupid when I realized how easy it was for the thief...he used a flat blade screwdriver to pop the back door lock. That was definitely an educational and eye opening experience.
Title: Re: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: spartan on January 30, 2010, 05:59:14 PM
Anyone ever been burglarized before? That's one of the things I'm thinking about for when we move out to the country.


I've never had my home burglarized but have had several cars broken into/gone through.  I used to live in a college town and it was not uncommon for license plates to be stolen or swapped and registration or insurance info to be taken.

When it comes to people visiting my house selling magazines, candy, books, I am not adverse to answering the door with a firearm visible on my person.
Title: Re: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: 19114life on January 30, 2010, 06:19:47 PM
I put in security systems every day for people and have had to go on service call for breakins.  People need to remember that the 2nd floor of your house is normally very vulnerable.  Just because it is high off the ground, people often forget about locking the windows or not having security measures installed.  I have been to multible house that have been broken into from the upstairs windows.  just walk around your house and ask your self if I locked my self out how can I get in I bet there is a door or a window that you normally over look.  If you have a tree close to your house or leave ladders outside you are helping the guy thats breaking into your house.  Another thing to remember is on your garage door, do you have glass windows on it.  If so did you remove the safety manual release cord that hangs from the door track. If not all some one has to do is break the glass and pull the rope, the door will now open without the motor.  You all don't know how many people I have had call me 2 years after I install a 3,000 security system for because they have never used the system and forgot what their code is.  Another thing people do is make their security code their birth date, PLEASE DONT DO THIS, and please don't make it 1234.  Modern technology has mad it alot harder to get around security systems, but all the technology in the world isnt gonna prevent you from not locking your doors.  Also for any body who is having a house built, have the the contract bring the phone box and telco line directly into the house and do not mount it on the outside of the house.  There are many cellular systems out there now for security systems but in rural areas they are always gonna work.  Thanks for listing and hope this helps.
Title: Re: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: joeinwv on January 30, 2010, 06:58:22 PM
I also tend to think that the average crook is not some criminal mastermind. If these guys had brains and liked to work, they would have jobs. The bottom line being, if target A is even marginally more difficult than target B, that's where they're going.

Since my wife and I both work, we are not home during the day. So I do not discourage my dogs from barking at the mail man.
Title: Re: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: JGreene on February 01, 2010, 07:36:36 AM
We where robbed when I was a kid, and we lived in the country. 

I like the idea of making MY home less attractive than the neighbor's. 

What about storing valuables in grocery packaging?  I can't imagine a thief going through the pantry.
I'm more concerned about the 'home invasion' scenario than a burglery.  I keep the doors locked all the time so at least they'll have to make noise to get in and it will slow them down long enough to 'prepare'.
Title: Re: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: Mr. Blank on February 01, 2010, 10:05:04 AM
Hume,
Great post man! I just turned your profile over to the state police!
 ;D
Title: Re: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: HumeMan on February 01, 2010, 05:11:11 PM
That's okay.  I just got off the phone with them.

I told them about how I interviewed you for this post.    ;D
Title: Re: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: Tackleberry on February 01, 2010, 05:57:53 PM
We where robbed when I was a kid, and we lived in the country. 

I like the idea of making MY home less attractive than the neighbor's. 

What about storing valuables in grocery packaging?  I can't imagine a thief going through the pantry.

If you have a storage area, put in boxes clearly labeled "garage sale" or "junk to sell."
Just an idea
Title: Re: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: SteveInTx on February 01, 2010, 06:12:38 PM
Regarding answering the door to salespeople.  I'm not one of Pavlov's dogs.  Just because you knock or ring my doorbell does not mean I will answer it, and generally I do not.  I have ways of checking to see who is there without going near the door.  100% of the time it is not someone I am expecting or need to talk to.  Opportunity sometimes knocks at your door for someone else (if you get my drift).
Title: Re: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: texican on February 01, 2010, 10:23:45 PM
Just visiting my place might get you a dirt nap.   There are no drive by's.  There's no just trying to sell this or that... if you made it this far, you are seriously looking for trouble... or more likely night hunting or poaching.  The few 'accidental's' that have made it down here got the third degree, license plate checks, driver's license number written down... and also found out where they lived.  If they were night hunting they got the fear of death put on them.

My cousin has guard dogs a mile up the dirt road from me... her dogs start barkin, and my guard dogs start barking, then the littler dogs start barking... there is no 'sneaking' up here... if I'm home, I greet them armed.  Step out of the vehicle without me to restrain the 90 something pound dogs, and one or the other of the pack is liable to take out some neck meat.  They're not gun shy, so a bad guy would need to shoot fast, and have plenty of reloads...

We're also on a burglar's nightmare.... a one way road... one way in, same way out... I've actually turned around out on the main highway, when I saw people that I didn't recognize, heading down the road leading to my road... if they made the right decision and took the left, no biggie, they were headed to a well location... take the right, they got some 'splaining to do.  Woe be to him caught leaving with a truckload of booty...

After the shtf, or if teotwawki comes, I think the presence of a hanging scarecrow (fake in the beginning, but anatomically correct, wrapped in a sheet, with rotting meat for effect.... and later on, if necessary, a real corpse) might discourage thieves.

I use to know all the thieves in the area, on a rough basis... I let it be known that if anything whatsoever happened bad down here, I'd come to 'see' them first... and they wouldn't see me.  For some reason, they always veered wide of me and mine...
Title: Re: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: ChadK on February 03, 2010, 10:41:00 AM
Not sure if I'm being paranoid or not, but....

Went to leave for the office this morning and garage door was open.  I just figured I left it open last night by mistake.  Then I tried to put the key in the deadbolt of the door between the house and the garage and the key would only go in a quarter of the way.  Same thing with the door knob.  I took the locks off the door and worked the key back and forth until it went all the way in.  This ended up pushing the back of the locks out the length of a key.  I just put them back on the door now that they work but that freaked me out.  I'm going to be changing my garage codes in a few minutes.

We live in a "rural" development, and haven't had any experience with this sort of thing.  My first thought is someone "read" the codes of the garage door openers and put something in the locks so they could get in later.  So, am I just being paranoid????
Title: Re: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: Tackleberry on February 03, 2010, 11:48:49 AM
What was the foreign object in the locks?
Have you lost a remote to the opener?
If you have an older opener, someone could have lifted the code. DO change the code anyway.
Shut your garage door & try to lift it by hand. You'd be surprised how many garage door openers will not lock the door down. I heard about this & tried it on my house. The door lifted right up with very little resistance. Fixed that immediately.
Title: Re: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: ChadK on February 03, 2010, 12:03:28 PM
Good tip TackleBerry, I will check that.  No remotes were taken, but I am changing them anyway.  I'm not sure what the objects were/are.  I took the lock/knob off the door with the intention of getting the objects out, but I couldn't see in there and with the knob and lock off the door the objects just went further and further into the lock as I tried to pull them out.  Now the key goes all the way in, and I don't have time (nor do I know how to take the locks apart) to change the locks.

Anyone have any ideas?  I might try taking them apart later...
Title: Re: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: Tackleberry on February 03, 2010, 12:08:25 PM
Just be sure you can lock that door between the house & garage. If you can't, unplug the opener & use the manual lock on the garage door.
Title: Re: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: JerseyVince on February 03, 2010, 12:46:25 PM
Simple but effective tool for garage doors is to put a Key/combination lock through one of the holes in the door track close to one of the rollers so even if they lift the door or have the code the door only goes up a cpl inches.
Almost every Gas Station/Dealership/work shop does or should do this.  I have and do
If your going away you can lock it but if your home and worried about a fire and not being able to unlock it in time just hook it through and if needed you can just pull the lock off and toss it without worrying about a key
Title: Re: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: Who...me? on February 03, 2010, 01:34:36 PM
When we bought our current house the garage door tracks had a hold driller right above one of the rollers and there was a bolt attached to a short length of chain.  The door I rarely use has the bolt in unless I am using it.  After I started coming home from work and finding the door open I started using the bolt in the track for the other door. And I changed the codes.

Probably unnecessary but I also wired the outlet that the opener is plugged into through a switch so when I get home and go into the house I hit the switch and the opener is unpowered.

Title: Re: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: ColdHaven on February 03, 2010, 03:30:49 PM
I have seen lists like this before, and even youtube videos where they talk about it. I believe Jack even covered some of this topic awhile back. Its very good advice that I think everyone should follow. Plan according to some of these things and I think you will have come a long way toward protecting your home more than most people do.
Title: Re: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: Mr. Blank on February 03, 2010, 10:20:55 PM
That's okay.  I just got off the phone with them.

I told them about how I interviewed you for this post.    ;D

Yet another one of my secrets out!  ;D
Title: Re: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: Spamity Calamity on February 11, 2010, 04:24:07 PM
23 Things REAL Burglars Know, But That You Don’t Think About

Do they really think I would not look in the lingerie drawer? Always check the bedside table, the medicine cabinet, and dresser drawers first. I found a stun gun in a drawer once. I guess they just did not take it with them.

A loud TV or radio can keep me away better than a good home alarm system. But some are unwilling to leave anything on while they are out of town, even when they can buy cheap devices like motion detectors with sirens and things that work on a timer that looks like someone is really there.

Never waste your time by going into kids' rooms. There is nothing but toys in there. They would never hide valuables in a child's room.

If they have decorative glass at the front entrance, see if they let the alarm company install the control panel where you can see it.

You can also spot a motion detector if it is near the entrance. Do they really think I cannot see the blinking armed light through glass?

Hey, in my neighborhood they will let me use the bathroom while I am working in their yard, so I can unlatch the back window to make it easy for me to get in when I come back. I can also look around for a surveillance camera in the area.

There is not enough time to break into that safe where their valuables are but if it's not bolted down, you can just take it with you.

Look in the windows. I look for signs that they could be home, and for an expensive TV or for a cabinet with china or silver. Even those fake surveillance cameras fool me. I can't tell the dummy cams from the real cams.

Drive at a normal speed through the neighborhood at night, before they close the blinds. You can just to pick your targets.

Do not be surprised if they pay loads of money for an expensive alarm system and walk right out of the house without setting it.

Always knock first. If they answer, just ask for directions somewhere or offer to mow their lawn. Carry a clipboard. If they answer be sure to check to see if they have any pepper spray in their hand or on a nearby table.

Sometimes, you can dress like a salesman and carry a couple of bottles that you bought at the dollar store. But you never, ever should look like a burglar.

Check on MySpace or Facebook because some of them will announce their vacation on their page. The kids are always bragging about the vacation.

I leave immediately if you see loud dogs or nosy neighbors. They will get you caught every time. At night I take pepper spray with me in case a dog chases me.

Break a window to get in, even if it makes a little noise. If the neighbor hears one loud sound, he'll listen and wait to hear it again. Don't worry; he won't check it out if he doesn't hear it again.

If they don't answer when I knock, sometimes I get lucky and walk right in when I try the door.

I always check windows to see if they are open just a crack during the day for a way to let in a little fresh air. It is easy to get inside from there.

Look around the outside of the house for nice manicured lawns or pretty flower beds. That tells you they have style... And that means there are expensive things inside.

If the car is left out in the driveway, walk buy and touch the hood. If it is warm, someone is at home they still may be awake. Just move on.

Those skate boards and toys their children haphazardly leave outside means they may have a nice computer or game system.

You really should look for newspapers piled up on the lawn.

Use the computer to generate and leave a pizza flyer on their door to see how long it takes them to remove it.

If it snows look for car and foot tracks in the drive or on the walk. If there are none after a couple of days they may be on vacation. You can come back during the night.

Burglary sounds like more of a hassle than going to work. I think ill keep my dayjob.
Title: Re: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: TigerDragon on February 11, 2010, 05:47:39 PM
My escrima instructor works in the local parole system, and often interviews felons who are coming off of a term of sentence and going into parole status.  One person interviewed recently was a well known burglar for our area.  These are some of the things he said were his M.O.

He preferred to steal guns.  That being said, he says "guns are not as lucrative" any more, because most police immediately notify the pawn shops in the area once a burglary is reported.  These days "gaming consoles" and "plasma tv's" are what are most lucrative around here.  Bearing in mind his preferred booty (guns) here were some of his methods for scouting for a target to rob.

If there were toys in the yard, he wouldn't touch the place.  Toys in the yard means a family with children, and they are more likely to show up unexpectedly while robbing the place than a home without children.

He looked for "big boy toys."  If there was a four wheeler / ATV or fishing boat visible, he could be just about 99% sure that there were guns in the house somewhere.

If there were enough dogs inside and / or outside, he wouldn't touch the place.  He wasn't particularly afraid of the dogs, but the noise they create is a problem.

If there were signs indicating the place is protected by a security alarm, he may or may not take the chance.  Most police won't respond within the time frame he would use to rob the place.

He would kick in the door and then listen.  If he heard movement inside or voices, he'd just leave.  If he didn't hear anything, he'd move in and check each room cautiously.

He never worked alone.  Always worked in groups of two.  One man inside the house, one man out.  Man inside would haul the load to the door.  Man outside would load from the door to the vehicle.

They never stayed for more than five minutes.  If they didn't find everything they wanted in that time frame, they moved on.  Most police seem to respond no sooner than fifteen minutes, because there are too many false alarms called in.

He never "cased" a joint really.  He would drive by and if the place looked like a good target, he'd stop and try it.  This was mostly at random.

He never hit a house in the middle of town.  He chose places closer to the outskirts where there are fewer neighbors to spy on them/call the police, and where the distance between houses was greater.

That's all I can remember off the top of my head, but I thought I'd share.
Title: Re: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: CyborgX on February 11, 2010, 06:33:59 PM
23 Things REAL Burglars Know, But That You Don’t Think About
If it snows look for car and foot tracks in the drive or on the walk. If there are none after a couple of days they may be on vacation. You can come back during the night.

Same thing I noticed about cars parked outside of the local train station. Some of them are piled up with snow. Good sign that nobody would walk out and see you trying to get into their car.
Title: Re: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: ridgerunnersurvival on February 12, 2010, 12:46:49 AM
Absolutly awsome topic.
One thing I do is the old school window locking method. When we got new windows, I measured the space between the bottom window and the top of the window frame and cut 2x4s to that length and physically blocked the window from opening. you can do this with sliding glass doors as well. with exterior doors, the simple act of putting a wooden jam under the door can stop all but the most determined theaf. If you have the ability, an actual bar across the door is also very effective.
Not the stuff most people think about in this day and age but they work, and have for many many years
Title: Re: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: Truik on February 12, 2010, 02:48:17 AM
He would kick in the door and then listen.  If he heard movement inside or voices, he'd just leave.  If he didn't hear anything, he'd move in and check each room cautiously.

That's a good post and quite a good bit of interesting information, however, I find the one comment above to be intriguing as it sounds like an amazing game of Russian roulette. What are the chances that, after barging in, the next sound he MAY hear would be a loud bang?

Title: Re: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: TigerDragon on February 12, 2010, 02:14:07 PM
That's a good post and quite a good bit of interesting information, however, I find the one comment above to be intriguing as it sounds like an amazing game of Russian roulette. What are the chances that, after barging in, the next sound he MAY hear would be a loud bang?



Considering his loot of choice was guns... yeah, I agree.  But that's how he operated.
Title: Re: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: “Mark” on February 15, 2010, 10:46:12 PM
People need to remember that the 2nd floor of your house is normally very vulnerable.  Just because it is high off the ground, people often forget about locking the windows or not having security measures installed.  I have been to multible house that have been broken into from the upstairs windows.  just walk around your house and ask your self if I locked my self out how can I get in I bet there is a door or a window that you normally over look.  If you have a tree close to your house or leave ladders outside you are helping the guy thats breaking into your house.

When I was little, and forgot my key at home, I'd get inside by taking an old wooden ladder we had to the second story bathroom window, and I would pop it open. I must have done that a dozen times.


An old friend of mine had his place burglarized several times, until one time he was home and caught the kid doing it red-handed, his VCR in hand. Pete, who had been a heavy duty mechanic for 30 years at the time, broke both of the kid's arms, then took pity on him by driving him to the hospital, and told him he'd kill him if he ever saw him around his place again. He never had a problem with crime since. I guess word got around...
Title: Re: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: mash on February 16, 2010, 01:13:22 AM
Burglary sounds like more of a hassle than going to work. I think ill keep my dayjob.

Ha! thanks Spamity for my 1st real belly laugh in a while. I think I "guffawed" technically.
Title: Re: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: ebonearth on February 18, 2010, 12:58:02 PM
Before #2 and I started dating he had his old place broken into and they only took his new plasma TV. After some discussion he came to the conclusion that it was an inside job as he had just had a large party and many people, some whom he did not know, were in the house generally unmonitored. Just goes to show that you never can tell. Now that we have relocated to the homestead we can take more aggressive protective measures.
Title: Re: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: Son_of_the_Republic on March 03, 2010, 12:21:29 PM
Been a spate of day-time burgalries in my area (Western NY) in recent days.It's a fairly rural location but not too far from some good sized towns but I hear these things are on the rise.Cleary they are scoping properties were folk are out at work.I guess it's less suspicious to approach a property during day-light hours.Apparently they have been working in groups of 2,1 clears a path through the house to the door where a waiting buddy loads up the get away vehicle.I work from home but am going away for a week or so later 2day.I shall be brining my guns and lap-top with me.Properties just a few roads down have been hit. Also properties with long drives are a better prospect for these people.Less nosey passer-by incidents I guess.
Title: Re: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: daved on March 28, 2010, 08:11:21 PM
When I was a kid who often forgot his keys, I'd get in through the basement window. They were just secured with a small bolt in some old wood. A little quick "persuasion" with my foot and they'd pop open. My dad finally got around to securing them a little better (unknown to me the next time I forgot my key). When I tried my trick to get in the next time I ended up breaking the glass (which I got in trouble for). However, broken glass or not I still got in in a matter of seconds.
If a grade school / early high school kid can figure out how to get in that easily, I'd imagine someone with a little more experience can do the same or better.
Based on that I've secured my basement windows much better than the ones from my youth.
Title: Re: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: BrianSTL on April 12, 2010, 11:07:00 AM
I owned a home that was burglarized and since that time, I have taken off the trim around the door and bolstered the area around where the deadbolt goes in with more wood, 4 inch screws so that they embed themselves into the studs, and have thorn bushed below the windows.

Last month my next door neighbor locked himself out of his house, and I observed the locksmith 'blow' through his lock with a pick device inside of 20 seconds.

Looks like I need to buy kids toys for the back yard!
Title: Re: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: javabrewer on April 12, 2010, 12:35:44 PM
Interesting article about a master thief...long read but good!

http://www.wired.com/magazine/2010/03/ff_masterthief_blanchard (http://www.wired.com/magazine/2010/03/ff_masterthief_blanchard)

Too bad he had to ruin his thief credibility by going into the credit card scam business.
Title: Re: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: VTaero on July 28, 2010, 07:17:46 PM
That article kinda reminds me of "Catch Me if You Can"

If you've only seen the movie and not read the book, I  highly recommend it.  It seemed that in the movie they toned some of the stuff Abignale got away with to make it more believable.
Title: Re: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: Andy in NH on July 28, 2010, 08:30:14 PM
Just be sure you can lock that door between the house & garage. If you can't, unplug the opener & use the manual lock on the garage door.

I put a switch in next to the garage door button and wired it to the opener.  When I pull in and close the door, I switch the power off to the door opener.  There is no need to have the door powered when everyone is home.  It stops the "phantom power draw" and saves about 15kWh each year.
Title: Re: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: Tackleberry on July 28, 2010, 08:36:15 PM
I put a switch in next to the garage door button and wired it to the opener.  When I pull in and close the door, I switch the power off to the door opener.  There is no need to have the door powered when everyone is home.  It stops the "phantom power draw" and saves about 15kWh each year.


Great idea. +1
Had not thought about that.
I love all the ideas this forum has to offer.
Title: Re: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: Ditch on September 16, 2010, 07:35:35 AM
A burglar doesn't necessarily have to case a home to realize what may be kept inside.  They can watch you and yours away from home.  For example, when you or a family member leaves home and goes out shopping, burglars can pick you as their target, to follow back home.  One way they sum up what you may have in your home is by the clothing your wear.  Baseball caps, tee shirts, logo patches on garments that advertise a club you belong to, perhaps what your favorite sport is, or even the fact that you are a gun owner  (GOT SIG).  Kids wear clothes advertising game systems that are the latest, most favorite, and definitely most expensive.  Ladies, do you have to have the most expensive garb and jewelry to do your grocery shopping?  Come on, do you have to use a Gucci or Fossil handbag just to run to the store?  Are you trying to impress your friends you hang with, or will you be the next fish on a stranger's line as a target.  Sure, go home and start unloading the groceries alone.  Are you really going to lock the house door each time you take a bag in and go back to the car to get the next one? 

How many homeowners place a sign on a gate that says, "Don't worry about the dog, worry about the owner and it displays a big picture of a handgun."  Oh sure, let's advertise what we have in our home.  So, how many folks here advertise that they are NRA members with bumper stickers, or paste some sticker in a vehicle window that shows what club or group membership you have, perhaps to a gun club?  Its like setting off an alarm that tells the criminals where you frequent (so they watch you), what your sporting habits are (so they know when you go hunting, or bowling, etc., and your family will be alone and vulnerable), and they know you have guns without ever getting near your home.  So they follow you around and then you become a victim or statistic.

Sometimes our own vanity or pride sets us up for the fall.  We should be aware of our own weaknesses, as much as we are the weaknesses in our homes.
Title: Re: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: 4bull on October 14, 2010, 10:42:05 PM
Last fall there were some strange brakeins out side of town , truned out the trash truck  puller was the spoter .
and if he left the can down thay fallowed and hit the place. 1 in side guy 1 load out guy.
inside guy just found and layed out on the table for the outside guy to pick the best.
was working out well untill granny left the great peraniese inside the house .
they just walked up a kicked the door in. and out came puff .
Title: Re: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: LJH on October 14, 2010, 11:26:59 PM
This thread is depressing me. I hate that decent people have to go to so much trouble and expense to protect from a few scumbags (who are probably out on parole for the umpteenth time after their latest wrist slap). Love the story of the Great Pyrenese encounter, those critters are born to protect. Bet that made a mess in Granny's parlor.   :D

Now I'm trying to think of anyone in our canyon who actually locks their doors and I'm coming up blank. Honestly, I'd bet most of us would have trouble even locating our door keys - I have no idea where mine are. Guess that's pretty dumb, but it's norm around here.
Title: Re: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: 4bull on October 14, 2010, 11:44:50 PM
im the big mean redneck around here. so i lock the door at night because of my girls.
but not when we leave the house ,only when we leave town for the week end.
then the fun who's got a key?
locks only keep honest people honest.
how do they get rid of all that stuff, must be hard up . sounds like work to me.
there's an old saying "that stolen water is alwase sweeter"?  i dout it.
small town life , i leave money in the registor and hand out keys to friends,i dont worry about it,
if we look out for our friends they look out for us.
Getting in a house isnt hard getting away is another thing.
Title: Re: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: JerseyVince on October 15, 2010, 12:50:02 PM
Here's something I learned last weekend from a buddy who was having his garage door fixed after a burglary attempt. They forced the top center of the garage away from the header and used a coat hanger/slimjim/similar tool to fish the rope and handle of the disconnect over the top of the garage door. They pulled it but were surprised when the door only went up 6inches because of the padlock on the door track. His was luckier than his neighbor who after just having his house redone, was cleaned out over a weekend.
My buddy cut the disconnects off and wire tied them so they cant be used except from inside the garage. His garage has access to the house which is alarmed

Watch those garage doors!!
Title: Re: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: daved on October 15, 2010, 03:54:33 PM
Here's something I learned last weekend from a buddy who was having his garage door fixed after a burglary attempt. They forced the top center of the garage away from the header and used a coat hanger/slimjim/similar tool to fish the rope and handle of the disconnect over the top of the garage door. They pulled it but were surprised when the door only went up 6inches because of the padlock on the door track. His was luckier than his neighbor who after just having his house redone, was cleaned out over a weekend.
My buddy cut the disconnects off and wire tied them so they cant be used except from inside the garage. His garage has access to the house which is alarmed

Watch those garage doors!!
I had a buddy lose all of his tools this way. (We suspect it was his lowlife cousin who just so happened to work installing garage doors that did it). Once I found out how easy it was to get in a garage this way, I took the pull cord off of my door. If I'm planning on going away on vacation, I might consider the padlock in the track just as some added insurance.
Title: Re: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: JerseyVince on October 15, 2010, 05:32:35 PM
That's who he suspects tried his house and robbed his neighbors, the last thing done was the garage doors and one of the keypads for the alarm is on the jamb of one of the garage doors. Someone probably watched them type in the alarm code

Hate to be that way but you haf to watch everyone that does work for you
Title: Re: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: Andy in NH on October 15, 2010, 07:13:01 PM
They forced the top center of the garage away from the header and used a coat hanger/slimjim/similar tool to fish the rope and handle of the disconnect over the top of the garage door.

My cousin is a firefighter and he told me that that is exactly the way they get into garages to fight the fire.
Title: Re: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: 4bull on October 15, 2010, 07:48:08 PM
the old electric key type garage door lock were put on with 2 little nails ,you just pry the cover out and cross the conections .
up she went. at one time i could pick a lock in a flash, had some fun putting possums in tool boxs at work.
Title: Re: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: daved on October 15, 2010, 07:56:04 PM
My cousin is a firefighter and he told me that that is exactly the way they get into garages to fight the fire.
I've heard that. I am willing to trade a very small risk of a firefighter not being able to open my door easily to fight a fire for the bigger reward of better security.
Title: Re: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: Andy in NH on October 15, 2010, 08:44:17 PM
I've heard that. I am willing to trade a very small risk of a firefighter not being able to open my door easily to fight a fire for the bigger reward of better security.

Yup - me too.  They can ram the side door for all I care if they are responding to a fire.

I should have mentioned that I removed the pull cord from the quick release based on my cousin's recommendation.  I fabricated a hook out of some round stock and keep it nearby in case it's needed.

I also cut the power to the garage door openers while we are at home or if we are going to be away for several days.
Title: Re: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: mike77 on October 15, 2010, 09:05:50 PM
I believe ITS Tactical had a great blog post about how easy of access pull cords on garage doors provide. They also make a couple of suggestions about securing them.

Mike
Title: Re: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: OldManSchmidt on November 23, 2010, 08:42:03 PM
Working under the reasonable assumption that the average Prepper is of above average intelligence, try this.  Try to break into your own home.  Don't tell the family (but don't risk getting yourself shot by your kinfolk either) and don't plan it ahead of time.  Just one day out of the blue, try to break in.  If you find a way to do it, you have a problem.

Seriously folks.  Doing this is just an exercise in trying to get inside the head of a potential threat.  We do this all the time as a matter of course (or we should be).  It is just a reversal of roles.  Instead of trying to figure out how to stop a threat, we change sides against ourselves and try to be the threat that is trying to get around or through our security measures.

You might be surprised by what you learn.  Also bear in mind that you are as smart as any "non-professional" thief and more so than most.  Also bear in mind that you are not likely ever to be matching wits with a true professional thief unless your possessions include the sort of things that would be found at a Southerby's auction.
Title: Re: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: daved on November 25, 2010, 06:40:35 AM
Working under the reasonable assumption that the average Prepper is of above average intelligence, try this.  Try to break into your own home.  Don't tell the family (but don't risk getting yourself shot by your kinfolk either) and don't plan it ahead of time.  Just one day out of the blue, try to break in.  If you find a way to do it, you have a problem.

I've thought about this, but by breaking into your own home you are at a disadvantage vs. a burglar. Does someone who wants into my house care if I have to replace a broken window or busted door frame? I mean if you're just checking to make sure there are no unlocked doors or windows to slip into then you're fine, but I can't see doing actual damage to my house trying this.
I think the only way to do this is half real exercise half mental exercise. Test what you can, but when it comes to the destructive stuff you're going to just have to use your imagination on where your weaknesses are. Personally I've got a few areas of my house that I feel are somewhat vulnerable, but I don't think I'd be able to break in without actually breaking in.
Title: Re: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: FrugalFannie on November 21, 2011, 06:47:02 PM
We where robbed when I was a kid, and we lived in the country. 

I like the idea of making MY home less attractive than the neighbor's. 

What about storing valuables in grocery packaging?  I can't imagine a thief going through the pantry.
I'm more concerned about the 'home invasion' scenario than a burglery.  I keep the doors locked all the time so at least they'll have to make noise to get in and it will slow them down long enough to 'prepare'.

LOL you obviously never watched the show others were referencing "It Takes a Thief" or whatever it was called.
Title: Re: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: tomtom on November 22, 2011, 11:44:55 AM
I have heard of people north of me having their cabins broken into with a chainsaw. They just cut the door up or go through a wall and they are in. Not sure how to prevent such a thing. Much of the security is taking care of the place you live in by keeping it up and showing that someone cares about it.
Title: Re: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: Jeremiah J on June 08, 2012, 06:46:58 PM
Just visiting my place might get you a dirt nap.   There are no drive by's.  There's no just trying to sell this or that... if you made it this far, you are seriously looking for trouble... or more likely night hunting or poaching.  The few 'accidental's' that have made it down here got the third degree, license plate checks, driver's license number written down... and also found out where they lived.  If they were night hunting they got the fear of death put on them.

My cousin has guard dogs a mile up the dirt road from me... her dogs start barkin, and my guard dogs start barking, then the littler dogs start barking... there is no 'sneaking' up here... if I'm home, I greet them armed.  Step out of the vehicle without me to restrain the 90 something pound dogs, and one or the other of the pack is liable to take out some neck meat.  They're not gun shy, so a bad guy would need to shoot fast, and have plenty of reloads...

We're also on a burglar's nightmare.... a one way road... one way in, same way out... I've actually turned around out on the main highway, when I saw people that I didn't recognize, heading down the road leading to my road... if they made the right decision and took the left, no biggie, they were headed to a well location... take the right, they got some 'splaining to do.  Woe be to him caught leaving with a truckload of booty...

After the shtf, or if teotwawki comes, I think the presence of a hanging scarecrow (fake in the beginning, but anatomically correct, wrapped in a sheet, with rotting meat for effect.... and later on, if necessary, a real corpse) might discourage thieves.

I use to know all the thieves in the area, on a rough basis... I let it be known that if anything whatsoever happened bad down here, I'd come to 'see' them first... and they wouldn't see me.  For some reason, they always veered wide of me and mine...

I live in very similar circumstances, except for all the dogs. One way in, same way out. If you're on my road or in my driveway, you better have a damn good reason to be there, or become lead proof real quick.

I was gone from my place for a large period of time. It was broken into, trashed, and probably picked over by any number of people over a long period of time.
The stuff I left behind was of no large value, and most of it, except things like photos and stuff was easily replaced. The worst part was that they left the doors wide open.
Upon my return, every living thing in the desert had moved into, and crapped in the house. Anything that could be chewed on by rats and mice was. I literally went through the house and threw almost every single thing away including my bed.

I then had to strip the house and take a power washer to the interior.

Long story short, the wife and I spent quite awhile getting the place back together and livable again.

But back to the point.

I am willing to kill any person I ever catch breaking in or stealing from me in the future. Period.

Moderator Note: Illegal acts will not be discussed on this forum.

What I am considering for the gate realistically is making up some headstones with some forms and cement. I'll make four.
At the gate there will be 3 mounds of dirt with headstones numbered 1,2, and 3. The fourth headstone will be marking and empty grave.
There will be a small sign on the gate that says, now serving, along with a tag #4.

Anyways, I've done a number of things to the place to help protect it, and my main theme is to make entry and theft a royal pita.

I've even gone so far as to put locks and hasps on doors that don't open.

Damn GTG....more later!

Edited to remove statements referring to illegal activities.
Title: Re: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: Saber19 on January 07, 2013, 08:17:21 PM
I love these threads. Know your enemy, friends...
There is a ton of good info here.
Title: Re: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: OldManSchmidt on January 07, 2013, 08:35:31 PM
Daved, when I wrote that, I was thinking of a situation that happened not long before where I actually did have to break in to my own home or sit for hours waiting on the wife.  To my dismay, it took me about 5 minutes to find a way in and about 3 more minutes to be standing inside my own house without ever having unlocked a lock.   Yours Truly the Idiot Boy had left the bathroom window unlocked.  I found out that the toilet makes a very convenient step on the way in and that my nosy neighbors aren't nearly as observant as I thought they were.  I also found out that the edges of those stupid 1950's era aluminum awnings that everybody put on windows back then are sharp enough to draw blood.  That discovery led me to the discovery of several brand new curse words of my own invention as well as just how much blood can come from a superficial wound to the scalp.
Title: Re: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: Luvmy45 on January 07, 2013, 10:33:59 PM
I have not seen any stats to this effect, so does anyone know..l are most home breakins done during the day or night?

I am assuming the day, as that is when no one is usually home and the neighborhood is the most empty.

Just curios, it seems like all the movie that we see the breakins are at night, and I'm thinking that's wrong.
Title: Re: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: oktheniknow on February 07, 2013, 08:37:09 AM
Great information.

We are moving to the country with a long drive so going to implement many of these.
I read on another forum about having thorny bushes next to windows and also crushed stone for pathways next to the house instead of concrete (which is silent). Keep ladders or anything that can be used as a tool out of sight and locked away. Video cameras (even if they are fake) are effective. Motion activated lights. 
 
You can get cheap or free plastic outdoor kids toys off of craigslist to put in the yard.
Title: Re: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: osubuckeye4 on February 07, 2013, 09:59:25 AM
The sad reality is... if someone REALLY wants to break into your house, they are going to get in.


That being said, there are a ton of things that people can do to make their home less attractive to a theif and greatly reduce the odds of a targeted attack.

- The biggest one... don't post information about trips to Facebook or any other social media site. (even here). I had a buddy one time link me to a post saying how excited he was for me to travel out of town for his wedding, I politely asked him to remove the post. That's basically just an invitation asking to be robbed.

- Don't have loud conversations about expensive new purchases with trusted friends in public places. You never know when the busboy at the restaurant by day is a burgler by night, or if the person behind you at the grocery store is going to follow you home to case your place.

- Have a trusted family member or friend in the area come over and grab your mail (or put a stop on your mail at the post office) and newspapers for you if you're going to be out of town for more than a few days.

- Personally, I would advise against buying large ticket items at public places with cash. I know that credit is the devil, but, get a pre-paid debit card and use that for those type of purchases. Buying things with cash (large bills) makes you a target, especailly when you open your wallet and a potential criminal sees a bunch of 20's, 50's or 100's. If you're buying a pack of gum and carrying $20, not a big deal. If you're buying $900 worth of groceries at Costco and have $2,000 in your wallet in 50's and 100's... a robber/theif will notice that.

- ALWAYS lock your doors (home and car). You'd be amazed at how many burglers will just casually walk up to car or home doors and try them to see if they will open. I've seen it happen a few times downtown in the city with cars.

- Never leave any small object of sig. value out in the open (car or home). Example, don't leave an envelope full of cash sitting on your first floor kitchen table where it is visable through a window. Never leave an IPad on  your passenger seat of your car. There's not a ton you can do about TV's in your home, but you can avoid leaving watches, necklaces, earrings and other expensive things out in the open.

- Don't host large parties with lots of "friends of friends" in attendance. It's great to host parties, but make sure you know the vast majority of people who are attending. I mean, I know it's impossible to never have someone you don't implicitely trust inside your place, but you can definitely limit risk and not ruin your social life in the process.

- If you have a crew doing daywork on your house, keep an eye on them all day and make sure you go with a reputable company. If you're hiring a crew to do a long term project, definitely do your homework on them before hiring them. Also, make sure valuables are hidden or put in a safe (preferably one out of sight from the workers)

- If you have a really expensive watch, guns, and a ton of cash... invest in a safe (bolt it down).


Again, you can't 100% make your house burgler proof, but, simple things like that can go a long way. The biggest thing you can do though, is to just be self-aware of the way you're presenting yourself and your property to the rest of the world.
Title: Re: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: ttubravesrock on February 07, 2013, 01:02:03 PM
You people are paranoid... That's not necessarily a bad thing though....

On the last page, someone mentioned chainsaws. Spend some time by your house with a chainsaw and figure out where you would use the chainsaw to enter the house. You can retrofit some rebar in these places pretty easily. If you put rebar in your door, you should probably let the fire department know though.

As for myself, my wife and I only lock the door if we will be gone for more than a couple days. Most of the time, we have our dog at home. That by itself is a huge deterrent. Back in TX we lived in a ghetto area where we had drug dealers and crackheads and random homeless people sleeping on the sidewalk, random gunshots in the night, etc. On our block, the only houses that had real dogs were us and the drug dealers. The only houses that didn't get robbed multiple times were us and the drug dealers. The only house that didn't get robbed once was us. We never owned any guns either. FYI, we did lock our doors when nobody was home when we lived there.

Having a big dog (or more than one) is probably better than any security system you can buy. Better than having guns. Having a stupid little yippy dog will only help you if you are at home. Nobody is scared of your 15 pound dog, your neighbors are used to it barking all the time, and you are probably used to it barking all the time too, so it probably wont even get your attention fast enough. Having said that, I do not recommend that someone who has never owned a dog before go out and buy a German Shepherd that will grow up to be 120 lbs. You would be better off going to your local no kill shelter and finding a well mannered "senior" dog that you can take home to make the end of their life more comfortable. Maybe do that a couple times until you can find the right type of dog for you.
Title: Re: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: osubuckeye4 on February 08, 2013, 03:10:53 PM
You people are paranoid... That's not necessarily a bad thing though....

As a young kid, I lived in a town that had a gigantic police force for a small and weathly population. I would agree that most of the things I listed above would be paranoia. People left their garage doors open all the time and there were very few robberies or home invasions.

Howver, I lived ghetto adjecent (there were 5 murders within a 3 block radius of my place in the span of a year) back in my early 20's with 6 other guys and it was a completely different story.

We had our back door kicked in one night by a burgler while I was out of town. One of my roommates who was in town came down, gun drawn, and held him at gunpoint until the cops came. My roommate asked him why he picked our place and the robber said he heard another of our roommates talking about all the nice stuff he had bought with his stipend check when he was at Chipotle with another buddy.


You really never know who is listening to what you're saying or observing your actions. That being said, if you're at a nice steakhouse in an affulant subburb, your odds of being tailed/targeted are extremely low. If you're at a McDonalds in the ghetto and pay for your cheeseburger with a hundred dollar bill, you're kind of painting a target on your back for people to rob you.

Better to have a healthy level of paranoia than to be completely oblivious and get all your nice stuff taken.  :)
Title: Re: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: NWBowhunter on February 25, 2013, 01:42:34 PM
Hit for the second time now at my rental. I been renovating. They took everything that wasn't nailed down or had the slightest value from outside. Including the Costco tarp garage. They didn't gain access to the interior this time.

Put up trail cams to try to identify where they are coming from.



Title: Re: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: ncjeeper on February 25, 2013, 03:50:12 PM
I have not seen any stats to this effect, so does anyone know..l are most home breakins done during the day or night?

I am assuming the day, as that is when no one is usually home and the neighborhood is the most empty.
Daytime mostly. You leave for work and they go to work (on stealing your stuff).
Title: Re: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: allofthemonkeys on October 05, 2013, 11:09:44 AM
When I was an officer I learned another thing thieves will do is break into your car, or just open the door if unlocked, take a look at the address on your registration, take your garage door opener.  They will then back a truck into your garage, if there is room, close the door and take their time unseen.
Title: Re: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: Oxymoron02 on November 10, 2013, 01:16:36 PM
With the Giftmas blitz coming, it is also worth noting that boxes by the curb, especially those for fancy-shmancy things like big screen TVs and video game systems, even shipping boxes from Amazon, on trash night alert burglars to potential good stuff inside.

Last year, my husband broke down all the Giftmas boxes and cut them into 1 foot squares.  Every week, a square or 2 got mixed down deep into the recycling (we have 2 large roll away bins).  If he gets too much stuff this year, we're going to drive it to the county recycling center.  It's November, and he's almost done with last year's boxes (too much family shipping us stuff).

I view Giftmas burglary as another good opportunity to toss out a FB status to all my non-prepper friends.  I don't push, I just toss out the occasional bit-o-wisdom and hope they listen.  :D
Title: Re: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: AvenueQ on November 10, 2013, 03:09:17 PM
With the Giftmas blitz coming, it is also worth noting that boxes by the curb, especially those for fancy-shmancy things like big screen TVs and video game systems, even shipping boxes from Amazon, on trash night alert burglars to potential good stuff inside.

Also, if your employer is cool with it, have big ticket items shipped to your work. There is almost always somebody there to receive packages and can keep an eye on it if you can't pick it up right away. This is what I did with my computer that I just ordered and couldn't have it shipped to my PO Box.
Title: Re: 23 Things REAL Burglars Know
Post by: Oxymoron02 on November 10, 2013, 08:42:33 PM
Also, if your employer is cool with it, have big ticket items shipped to your work. There is almost always somebody there to receive packages and can keep an eye on it if you can't pick it up right away. This is what I did with my computer that I just ordered and couldn't have it shipped to my PO Box.

And if your employer isn't cool with it, it pays to get to know your neighbors.  We have a SAHM homeschooling 4 kids on one side, a retired lady on the other, and another retired lady across the street.  The house behind us has someone home all day too.  Any of them would gladly watch for and retrieve a box if we needed them to.  And good luck to any burglar who thinks they wouldn't be noticed in my yard.