Author Topic: Survival Summary  (Read 143810 times)

Offline The Wilderness

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Re: Survival Summary
« Reply #30 on: April 13, 2009, 01:24:43 PM »
Awesome! +1

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Re: Survival Summary
« Reply #31 on: April 13, 2009, 06:53:39 PM »
how much would you say that much food adds up to in terms of cost if you were to buy it all at once?

Offline TJ

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Re: Survival Summary
« Reply #32 on: April 13, 2009, 07:02:22 PM »
As for the cost im going to guess 3,000+/- few hundred

I'm going to make one of those survival summary things, and I need to inventory my medical gear again, i lost the papers i have detailing it. I'm going to guess it's about a $100 kit now that i've added some things to it, i'd like 3 packages of quik-clot and a few cpr mouthguards though.

But man nice preps there, wouldnt even think of coming near your house after shtf haha.

Offline Roswell

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Re: Survival Summary
« Reply #33 on: April 13, 2009, 07:31:54 PM »
that pantry is serious!  Good job man, that is awesome.

Offline gigaJack

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Re: Survival Summary
« Reply #34 on: April 13, 2009, 11:56:17 PM »
how much would you say that much food adds up to in terms of cost if you were to buy it all at once?

One Mountain House purchase of $700
Another Mountain House purchase of $400
LDS purchase of $1,200
The rest would be either warehouse purchases of $300-$500 a pop and doubling up regular grocery store purchases.

Wifey guesses $5k and I would guess around $3k (but I have never came close to guessing the gumballs in a jar either). Now that we have a years worth we can just keep our supplies up and rotating.
« Last Edit: April 13, 2009, 11:58:32 PM by gigaJack »

Offline Harold J. Forbes

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Re: Survival Summary
« Reply #35 on: April 14, 2009, 02:06:16 PM »
Awesome stuff!

As for the question of non-members using LDS cannery facilities, there is no requirement that you have to be LDS to use the cannery. It is open to all. Just make sure you call ahead and make an appointment, and you may need to give them a general summary of what you need so they can have it available.

FYI, as long as you are willing to can it yourself and there is the manpower there to work everything, you typically aren't limited to leftovers from prior cannings or prepackaged, provided you are taking a decent amount of the bag that will be opened. Groups of about 8-12 from LDS wards usually go for a canning session so that it doesn't take forever. It may be worthwhile to schedule to go the same night a ward group is coming in so there is enough manpower for things to run smoothly.

Offline gigaJack

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Re: Survival Summary
« Reply #36 on: April 14, 2009, 11:00:59 PM »
I have modified the following to my Survival Summary (http://docs.google.com/View?docid=dfhfncbq_4cdd482fx).

Bought 3 months of cat litter and now have 6 months worth
Added more everyday food to make it 11-12 months of Storage Food

Offline Chris Redfield

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Re: Survival Summary
« Reply #37 on: April 15, 2009, 07:09:03 AM »
Amazing summary, spreadsheet - I've just been able to breeze through this, but it looks like an amazing setup. Consider my mind blown; and once I get it back together, I'll have to look at it for some indicators and suggestions. I've got a dog and two cats myself (but no kids at the moment) so I have to consider them in prepping as well.

And those pictures? Put my jaw on the floor.

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Re: Survival Summary
« Reply #38 on: April 15, 2009, 06:49:32 PM »
Thanks for sharing such a great and comprehensive list.  I look forward to going through it more fully.

Offline Louisiana Suvivor

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Re: Survival Summary
« Reply #39 on: April 24, 2009, 11:44:40 PM »
hey GJ......you LDS? i am and if you're not you took a great page outta our book man. AWESOME FOOD STORAGE!

Offline gigaJack

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Re: Survival Summary
« Reply #40 on: April 24, 2009, 11:59:32 PM »
Not LDS, but I learned a lot from the website and pdf's. We bought about half of our storage food from our local stake to put us at the 1 years worth however. We bought a bunch of the staple cases and then they said we can take our pick of the recently cans from the last canning. They said they appreciated it because it helps them out also.

Offline Louisiana Suvivor

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Re: Survival Summary
« Reply #41 on: April 26, 2009, 01:38:36 AM »
yeah man. it's a pretty sweet thing we got going at the Store house. and the good thing is that anyone can go and buy stuff and donate activity

Offline gigaJack

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We are not "Survivalists" we are "Risk Management Specialists".
« Reply #42 on: April 28, 2009, 11:00:29 AM »
We are not "Survivalists" we are "Risk Management Specialists".

Risk management is the discipline of identifying, monitoring and limiting risks. In some cases the acceptable risk may be near zero. Risks can come from accidents, natural causes and disasters as well as deliberate attacks from an adversary. Read more about Risk Management here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Risk_management.

Potential Risk Treatments
Once risks have been identified and assessed, all techniques to manage the risk fall into one or more of these four major categories: (See below for details)

• Avoidance (eliminate)
• Reduction (mitigate)
• Transfer (outsource or insure)
• Retention (accept and budget)

My Risk Mitigation Strategies

Restaurant
   • Sitting Position (Reduction)
      • I think just facing the door is not enough.
      • Facing the door is assuming a crazed gunman will come running through the front door and start shooting up the place. I think there is just as much if not more of a chance of someone already in the restaurant gets a bug up their ass and goes postal.
      • The place that I have found to have the most tactical advantage is by the rear of the dining area where there is a back exit.
      • Oh yeah, and me facing the front or the bulk of people.
   • Dining Times (Reduction)
      • If we are going to go out to eat I get off work early to make it to the restaurant to ensure we arrive before 5pm.
      • This aids in a couple of ways.
      • There is always a table available.
      • There is not wait time.
      • We are done eating by the time others are arriving and ordering.
Driving
   • Road Rage (Avoidance)
      • I use to be the “tough guy”. I would not take any crap from anyone. I figured I had many years of fighting and could at least hold my own with most. After I got my CCW my outlook changed. I figured if I was carrying then the jackass in the car next to me might be. I don’t get sucked in to others rage by aggravating them anymore then they currently are. If I were to get into a shooting match with another would I thought it was worth it if I were dead and couldn’t support my family or if I were under investigation for illegally using my firearm being a willing participant.
   • Lane Choices (Reduction)
      • If there is three lanes to choose from I will choose the lane that allows me to jump the curb and utilize my 4X4.
   • Parking Lots (Avoidance)
      • I park in a lighted part of parking lots almost in the back away from most of the parked cars.
      • I always park in the same location at each store I frequent and I never have to walk around to look for my vehicle.
   • Accidents (Transfer & Retention)
      • We carry insurance for damage caused to others property.
      • We don’t carry replacement insurance on our vehicles because we could use the other vehicle until we could by another used 4x4.
      • Window hammer
      • Seat belt cutter
      • First aid
      • Camera
      • Pen & paper
      • Flares
   • Car Jacking (Reduction)
      • I pocket all my CCW and don’t have a good access to them while sitting in a vehicle.
      • I velcroed a holster to my driver’s seat by my right knee. Each time I get in my vehicle I take my CCW out and holster it at the ready.
Death (Transfer)
   • Life insurance policies
Food Storage
   • Food (Reduction)
      • We have 1 years worth of food on hand.
      • We have 500 square feet of garden to grow more food.
   • Water (Reduction)
      • We have over 1 month water on hand. With the means to make as much as we need.
   • Cooking (Reduction)
      • We have the means to cook food other than the stove.
Computers
   • Virus (Reduction)
      • Run anti-virus programs on all computers.
   • Privacy (Avoidance)
      • Use proxy software when needed.
Health
   • Get Sick (Reduction)
      • We have a Health Savings Account HSA with enough of a balance to cover our out of pocket maximum.
      • Long term disability.
   • Swine Flu/Et Cetera  (Avoidance)
      • We stay at home until I am sure we won’t catch anything.
   • Medications (Reduction)
      • Have prescribed medication stored up.
      • Have amoxicillin and other antibiotics stored up.
Financial
   • Dollar Becomes Worthless (Reduction)
      • Have metals on hand.
   • Lose Job (Reduction)
      • Have cash and metals on hand.
   • 401k (Avoidance)   
      • Currently keeping money in the cash account.
Home
   • Theft (Transfer & Reduction)
      • Home owners insurance provides the risk transfer.
      • Fortified Home: The security system, security window film & upgraded locks provide the risk reduction.
      • Guns to protect while we are home.
      • Police scanner.
   • Damage (Transfer)
      • Home owners insurance provides the risk transfer.
      • We can also load up our vehicles and bug out.
   • Heating (Reduction)
      • We have means to heat our house for 1 month in the winter.
   • Cooling (Retention)
      • We live in the north so cooling is not so critical so we can deal with the heat in summer.
Work
   • Fire (Reduction)
      • Fire escape hood
      • Fire extinguisher
   • Civil Unrest (Reduction)
      • Get home bag
      • CCW
Cannot Go To Work (Avoidance)
   • Work from home
   • Eat/drink reserves

Risk Avoidance
Includes not performing an activity that could carry risk. An example would be not buying a property or business in order to not take on the liability that comes with it. Another would be not flying in order to not take the risk that the airplane was to be hijacked. Avoidance may seem the answer to all risks, but avoiding risks also means losing out on the potential gain that accepting (retaining) the risk may have allowed.

Risk Reduction
Involves methods that reduce the severity of the loss or the likelihood of the loss from occurring. For example, sprinklers are designed to put out a fire to reduce the risk of loss by fire. This method may cause a greater loss by water damage and therefore may not be suitable. Halon fire suppression systems may mitigate that risk, but the cost may be prohibitive as a strategy.

Risk Retention
Involves accepting the loss when it occurs. True self insurance falls in this category. Risk retention is a viable strategy for small risks where the cost of insuring against the risk would be greater over time than the total losses sustained. All risks that are not avoided or transferred are retained by default. This includes risks that are so large or catastrophic that they either cannot be insured against or the premiums would be infeasible. War is an example since most property and risks are not insured against war, so the loss attributed by war is retained by the insured. Also any amounts of potential loss (risk) over the amount insured is retained risk. This may also be acceptable if the chance of a very large loss is small or if the cost to insure for greater coverage amounts is so great it would hinder the goals of the organization too much.

Risk Transfer
In the terminology of practitioners and scholars alike, the purchase of an insurance contract is often described as a "transfer of risk." However, technically speaking, the buyer of the contract generally retains legal responsibility for the losses "transferred", meaning that insurance may be described more accurately as a post-event compensatory mechanism. For example, a personal injuries insurance policy does not transfer the risk of a car accident to the insurance company. The risk still lies with the policy holder namely the person who has been in the accident. The insurance policy simply provides that if an accident (the event) occurs involving the policy holder then some compensation may be payable to the policy holder that is commensurate to the suffering/damage.

Limitations
If risks are improperly assessed and prioritized, time can be wasted in dealing with risk of losses that are not likely to occur. Spending too much time assessing and managing unlikely risks can divert resources that could be used more profitably. Unlikely events do occur but if the risk is unlikely enough to occur it may be better to simply retain the risk and deal with the result if the loss does in fact occur. Qualitative risk assessment is subjective and lack consistency.
Prioritizing too highly the risk management processes could keep an individual from ever completing a project/preparations or even getting started.

It is also important to keep in mind the distinction between risk and uncertainty. Risk can be measured by impacts x probability.

Offline Heavy G

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Re: Survival Summary
« Reply #43 on: April 28, 2009, 11:56:37 AM »
Great post, gigaJack. +1.

Offline gigaJack

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Survival Summary Updated
« Reply #44 on: May 03, 2009, 12:37:46 AM »
I have modified the following to my Survival Summary (http://docs.google.com/View?docid=dfhfncbq_4cdd482fx).

• Used up $1k from savings.
• Bought 1 Sunforce 50056 Solar Accessory Kit.
• Bought 1 55 gallon water containers to make it 4 containers now.
• Bought a Wayne Portable Pump — 1450 GPH, 1/2 HP, 3/4in., Model# PC4 after our last pump "broke" it helps if I don't lubricate the wrong hole.
  • We use this to change the water in our 55 gallon water containers.
  • This will also be used to procure water after out clean water is used up. We will put one of the 55 gallon water containers in the back of the truck on its side with the bung hole to fill on the top. We will backup to a lake and begin to pump until about full. When we arrive back home we will transfer the water to another container to await filtration.
• Bought 300 LDS Oxygen Absorbers (their site is down and cannot get the link)
• Bought 250 LDS 1 gallon 7mil Mylar bags (their site is down and cannot get the link)
• While testing our dehydrator we had dried enough (green beans, corn, strawberries, apples, pears, bananas, broccoli, mushrooms, peas, carrots) to make our own guinea pig food. We bought the cheaper pellets and mixed in a 1 to 2 ration of fruit/veggie to pellet mix to make 64 cups. We put our new Mylar bags and O2 suckers to the test. So far after one day they have not completely sucked all the air out. I will give it till tomorrow then I will crack them open and use two O2 sucker.
• We figured out it was waaay too much work to till up the steep front hill to put in a huge strawberry patch. Landscapers wanted too much for the task. We will only be installing a 10'x10' to go along with the backyard 4'x20' patch.
• Broke the Open Country Sportsman Kitchen Electric Food Grinder. What a piece of crap. I got what I paid for. The piece where the drive shaft connects to the food auger is a crappy little piece of plastic. When the auger cannot chew the food good enough and it locks up it rips the plastic part to shreds. I threw it in the trash. If I need another in the future I will spend more money for a better one.

Offline The Wilderness

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Re: Survival Summary
« Reply #45 on: May 17, 2009, 06:42:40 PM »
After all this time of admiring you summary I finally copied it to a word file and am modifying it to fit our situation, It is without a doubt the best I have ever seen and I read a lot. Great job and thank you very much.

The Wilderness

Offline TNDadx4

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Re: Survival Summary
« Reply #46 on: May 18, 2009, 10:35:31 AM »
I would like to through in my congratulations, also! You have put a lot of time and effort into it and should be very proud!

It sets some high standards to shoot for!

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Re: Survival Summary
« Reply #47 on: May 24, 2009, 01:48:24 AM »
Inspiring!!!!

Offline yrone

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Re: Survival Summary
« Reply #48 on: May 24, 2009, 07:30:34 AM »
Looks goooooooooood!

Offline gigaJack

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Antibiotics...
« Reply #49 on: May 27, 2009, 08:56:44 PM »
I have modified the following to my Survival Summary (http://docs.google.com/View?docid=dfhfncbq_4cdd482fx).

My folks have another place near the Mexico border and they buy two year supply each year for us. We don't self medicate. They will only be used if directed by a doctor and regular medications cannot be obtained via a pharmacy.

  • Amoxicillin - treats many different types of infections caused by bacteria, such as ear infections, bladder infections, pneumonia, gonorrhea, and E. coli or salmonella infection
  • Roxidolin (Doxiciclina/Doxycycline) - Anthrax, Bacterial Infection, Bronchitis, Cholera, Common Cold, Lyme Disease, Malaria, Plague, Pneumonia, Skin Infection, Urinary Tract Infection
  • Genoflox (Ciprofloxacino/Ciprofloxacin) - Anthrax, Bacterial Infection, Bladder Infection, Bone infection, Bronchitis, Cholera, Infectious Diarrhea, Intraabdominal Infection, Joint Infection, Kidney Infections, Meningitis, Plague, Pneumonia, Salmonella, Sinusitis, Skin Infection, Traveler's Diarrhea, Tuberculosis, Typhoid Fever, Urinary Tract Infection
  • Azitromicina/Azithromycin - Bronchitis,Common Cold, Lyme Disease, Pneumonia, Sinusitis, Skin Infection, Tonsillitis, Typhoid Fever

Offline pac1911

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Re: Survival Summary
« Reply #50 on: June 05, 2009, 11:13:16 PM »
Wow - very impressive.  I feel like I have along way to go, but we all do in one way or another.

I have a thought on one of your to do items.  ou have listed a sthil ms290 chain saw.  Consider instead the sthil ms260 or ms260 pro.  The 260 is just a touch less powerful than the 290 but it is 3 pounds lighter.  this weight makes a big difference after a day of cutting.  I run my 260 with an 18" bar and six chains.  At any time 3 can be waiting to get sharpened while 3 are ready to go.  I choose the 260 over the 260 pro because it was cheaper and the only valuble difference was the pro starts a bit easier.  260 starts just fine.  Don't forget your safety gear!
I hope this info is helpful.
pac

Offline gigaJack

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Re: Survival Summary
« Reply #51 on: June 07, 2009, 12:20:22 PM »
Thanks for the feedback on the Stihl.

We are going to buy a wood burning stove before the cold this year and we will be needing all the tools that accompany it. I really just pick a model at semi-random but I knew I needed to dig a little deeper into the product details.

Offline jackiebeans

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Re: Survival Summary
« Reply #52 on: June 20, 2009, 08:46:31 AM »
Hey guys thanks for sharing... See lots of lists on different forums and when I get to see one in function, it helps me to re-evaluate my own and make mods...


Offline SLOHomemaker

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Re: Survival Summary
« Reply #53 on: July 13, 2009, 05:19:57 PM »
I am,  like, totally in AWE of gigaJack!

Something to aspire to. Well prepped basement and family.

I just decided that for grandkids' b'day, they will be getting #10 cans from ProvidentLiving. Not as much fun as a toy, but they can build forts or something after tshtf.

And #1 son will be pleased that I'm helping him and DIL prep.

 ;D

Offline Ragzilla

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Re: Survival Summary
« Reply #54 on: July 19, 2009, 02:39:24 PM »
You have a great set-up.  I do have one observation tho.
On the left hand side of your first picture you have cleaning supplies on a shelf above food products.  This is generally not advisable.  If one of your liquid cleaners were to leak it would contaminate the food below.
We have a separate shelf for cleaning supplies and also keep any food liquids on the bottom shelves.

Offline gigaJack

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Re: Survival Summary
« Reply #55 on: July 20, 2009, 12:48:11 AM »
We have the cleaning products up top due to our dumb ass animals that try to eat anything they think might be food. But I think they should be smart enough not to eat anything that smells as bad as cleaning supplies.

Thanks for the tip. We will implement.

Offline Artos

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Re: Survival Summary
« Reply #56 on: July 20, 2009, 05:44:50 AM »
EXCELLENT!  I just finished an huge Excel sheet to help me focus and track my prep purchases but this is much more comprehensive in less concrete preps, plus those are really well done as well.

Ive copied it to use as a model for my own, though Ill probably do mine in Excel for ease of use for me.

Offline Klonus

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Re: Survival Summary
« Reply #57 on: August 30, 2009, 01:29:20 PM »
A summary is a great idea. It actually inspired me to start a prep journal documenting my days of becoming an ant from a grasshopper and the many trials and errors over the months.  Its really helped put a focus on what I have and what I need.  Staying vigilant and not becoming complacent with what preps we do have can be a challenge so I hope this will solve that.  Thanks for the great post!

Offline mxitman

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Re: Survival Summary
« Reply #58 on: September 06, 2009, 02:21:47 PM »
wow, great setup, do you know what service or parent company the Kajeet phone service goes through?

Offline idelphic

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Re: Survival Summary
« Reply #59 on: September 14, 2009, 03:41:48 PM »
EXCELLENT!  I just finished an huge Excel sheet to help me focus and track my prep purchases but this is much more comprehensive in less concrete preps, plus those are really well done as well.

Ive copied it to use as a model for my own, though Ill probably do mine in Excel for ease of use for me.
I agree with you Cpt - Excel,.. Even Access (GASP!) would be a great point to keep track of, run reports to see where you have limitations, and run some comparisons..  I am working towards managing my Equipment and items in Excel so tracking is easier,..  It's also a resource that is irreplaceable should your home or other location be broken into or destroyed by fire or etc.  If you know what you had,.. then it's easier to report to the insurance company so that you can get your investment 'returned'.

Survival Summary's may want to include copies of documents and inventory of items - Serial Numbers and etc for the same purpose.