Author Topic: Cold Weather Preps  (Read 15036 times)

Lucretius

  • Guest
Re: Cold Weather Preps
« Reply #30 on: October 28, 2008, 03:05:00 AM »
Coldhaven.  I agree on the Hothands.  My wife gets very cold (painfully cold) hands when it is cold enough to snow.  Beyond the frostbite question, warm hands do a lot for her morale.

I think they're great for comfort, but alas not for survival.

Your body retracts the bloodflow from the limbs in the cold for a reason: to keep the core temperature up. If you apply external heat sources to hands or feet you trick your body into start pumping out blood to arms and legs - and your body heat radiates away from you.
I keep some in my BoB for putting in pockets or for temporary hand warming if my hands are to cold and stiff to start a fire, for example.

...and there's nothing wrong with comfort, anyway. You'll just have to sacrifice some of that in a survival situation!  :-\

Offline ColdHaven

  • Coldylocks
  • Moderator On Leave
  • Survival Demonstrator
  • *
  • Posts: 3457
  • Karma: 175
  • How about a scary crow little fire?
Re: Cold Weather Preps
« Reply #31 on: November 03, 2008, 09:42:07 AM »
I am not mentioning the Hot Hands as a comfort item. I meant to use them if there was a genuine threat of frost bite. That is very unlikely here in NC, but you can never tell when the weather will change. I would rather have them (at such a low cost) and never use them than to need them and not have them. If I found myself threatend with frost bite I would definitely use one if I could not find a source of heat quickly enough.

Lucretius

  • Guest
Re: Cold Weather Preps
« Reply #32 on: November 03, 2008, 02:39:20 PM »
I am not mentioning the Hot Hands as a comfort item. I meant to use them if there was a genuine threat of frost bite. That is very unlikely here in NC, but you can never tell when the weather will change. I would rather have them (at such a low cost) and never use them than to need them and not have them. If I found myself threatend with frost bite I would definitely use one if I could not find a source of heat quickly enough.

I hear you! But their utility for SURVIVAL could be negative, since they warm extremeties and thus lowers your core temp. Since I'm not survivalist enough to start cutting of fingers or toes to keep alive, I'm in you camp!  ;D
BUT, the most survivalist attitude would be to keep your core temp high, and cut of any toes or fingers that are getting black... and in that scenario, Hot Hands and counter productive. Just sayin'.

Offline ColdHaven

  • Coldylocks
  • Moderator On Leave
  • Survival Demonstrator
  • *
  • Posts: 3457
  • Karma: 175
  • How about a scary crow little fire?
Re: Cold Weather Preps
« Reply #33 on: November 03, 2008, 02:43:13 PM »
Well that is certainly something to consider.  :D But I am not much of a survivalist either. Not enough to cut off fingers, toes, ect. Then again, if NC gets that cold I will be having other problems as well.

ottowolf

  • Guest
Re: Cold Weather Preps
« Reply #34 on: November 09, 2008, 09:36:14 AM »

Lucretius

  • Guest
Re: Cold Weather Preps
« Reply #35 on: November 09, 2008, 09:53:53 AM »
Since I'm living where I'm living (scandinavia), I might as well contribute with what cold weather experience I've accumulated... ;)
Here comes the first in a long line of random cold weather advice:

If stuck outdoors in harsh winter weather, and your best way to keep warm is to build a fire, remember this:

2 - 5 smallish fires are better than one huge pyre.

You can't stand close enough to a big fire to get the benefit of all its warmth anyway, so if you've got lots of wood, build a couple of smaller fires in a semicircle. If you can build them in front of some kind of reflector (such as a rock wall), you utilize an enormous amount of the heat energy generated. Moreover, you won't be well cooked on one side of the body while frozen on the other... ::)

Offline archer

  • Administrator
  • Ultimate Survival Veteran
  • *******
  • Posts: 17100
  • Karma: 380
  • #ImissAmerica
    • Journey to Greener Pastures
Re: Cold Weather Preps
« Reply #36 on: November 09, 2008, 11:22:41 AM »
+1! Good idea!

Lucretius

  • Guest
Re: Cold Weather Preps
« Reply #37 on: November 09, 2008, 11:47:59 AM »
+1! Good idea!

And I wish it was mine!  :D

Seriously, though, this is one of those ideas that potentially could save your life one day...

Offline ColdHaven

  • Coldylocks
  • Moderator On Leave
  • Survival Demonstrator
  • *
  • Posts: 3457
  • Karma: 175
  • How about a scary crow little fire?
Re: Cold Weather Preps
« Reply #38 on: November 10, 2008, 08:01:09 AM »
+1 Lucretius. Wonderful idea!

I remember reading about using reflectors when making a fire, but I never thought of  using more than one fire, and it becomes obvious to me why it would be so beneficial. If one fire goes out, all of it doesn't go out, and you can still have warmth while trying to get the other started. More fires also means more distribution of heat as it comes off the fires. Add in reflectors and you have yourself a pretty cozy area, though the person in charge of keeping all of them lit will be almost a full time job, I would think.

Lucretius

  • Guest
Re: Cold Weather Preps
« Reply #39 on: November 10, 2008, 09:49:52 AM »
If one fire goes out, all of it doesn't go out, and you can still have warmth while trying to get the other started.

+1 Yet another benefit for the multi fire option.  8)

Offline Heavy G

  • Distorting the Space-Time Continuum
  • Moderator On Leave
  • Survival Veteran
  • *
  • Posts: 6779
  • Karma: 310
  • A misfit ant in a grasshopper world.
    • 299 Days
Re: Cold Weather Preps
« Reply #40 on: March 15, 2009, 09:23:14 PM »
(This thread has been selected as a “best of” thread by Heavy G.  You can search for “best of” threads by using that term in the search mode.  Everyone on the forum is encouraged to reply to a post they think is “best of” worthy so we can all search for them.  For more information on the “best of” thing, see http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=3423.0 )

Offline Darkwinter

  • Junior Evil Overlord
  • Moderator On Leave
  • Survival Demonstrator
  • *
  • Posts: 2171
  • Karma: 116
  • Has his wife's permission
Re: Cold Weather Preps
« Reply #41 on: March 30, 2009, 05:54:30 PM »
I am in NE Ohio as well.  I spent a little bit of money on some Under Armour.  I wore the leggings and longsleve undershirt all winter long.  This stuff is expensive but I highly recomend it to anyone who spends time outdoors in the cold.  The best part about it, was I was warm but didn't sweat!

http://www.underarmour.com/shop/us/en/mens/sports/snow-sports

Offline Darkwinter

  • Junior Evil Overlord
  • Moderator On Leave
  • Survival Demonstrator
  • *
  • Posts: 2171
  • Karma: 116
  • Has his wife's permission
Re: Cold Weather Preps
« Reply #42 on: March 30, 2009, 05:55:54 PM »
I almost forgot the reason for the post.  As spring approches, this stuff might go on sale.  (Or any other winter item)  Might be worth looking at the clearance rack this spring to stock up on some good winter survival gear. :D

Lucretius

  • Guest
Re: Cold Weather Preps
« Reply #43 on: April 04, 2009, 11:31:04 AM »
Yes, now that summer is coming, winter gear's cheap! Time to buy is now, if you think there will be another winter...

Offline Darkwinter

  • Junior Evil Overlord
  • Moderator On Leave
  • Survival Demonstrator
  • *
  • Posts: 2171
  • Karma: 116
  • Has his wife's permission
Re: Cold Weather Preps
« Reply #44 on: April 04, 2009, 12:31:38 PM »
DARKWINTER!!!  C'mon!  of course it will snow again!

bioboy

  • Guest
Re: Cold Weather Preps
« Reply #45 on: April 04, 2009, 04:14:28 PM »
I would suggest a rabbit fur hat and buying tough duck parka insulated overalls and a really good pair of mitts not gloves wear them underneath but mitts work better.. I use to work in Manitoba which can get lower then -40F Think North Dakota. I have worked outside in high winds (don't ask) and I was quite warm just had to watch the face for freezing. I had a normal toque and froze my ear tips a little they hurt until last year in the winter when it was cold.                 



Here's what I'm talking about
http://www.weaverdevore.ca/product_info.php/products_id/78

http://shopping.msn.ca/results/clothing-shoes/bcatid5/tough-duck/2-4914/forsale?text=category:clothing-shoes+Brand:Tough-Duck   

http://www.furhatworld.com/rabbit-full-fur-russian-trooper-hat-black-p-351.html

Offline ClarkB

  • Senior Survivalist
  • ****
  • Posts: 209
  • Karma: 16
Re: Cold Weather Preps
« Reply #46 on: April 04, 2009, 05:31:44 PM »
A tent that can handle winter camping (4 season tent) and good sleeping bags are a necessity for cold weather survival.  My wife and I each have three sleeping bags - 0 deg. F., 20 deg., and 40 deg.   The 0 deg. bags are rectangular design, and the other two are mummy type bags.  By putting the 20 degree bag inside the 0 degree bag you can endure sleeping in sub-zero temps.  If you spend about 8 hours a day "in the sack" then you can conserve heating fuel by not needing it when you are in the sleeping bag.

I live in Upstate NY, at the edge of the "Tug Hill Plateau" where we get unbelievable 'Lake Effect' snowfall. from Lake Ontario.  Winter survival is something that people in the south don't need to consider, but can be a life or death situation in the north.  So I am glad to see some discussion on this topic.  If a person is properly prepared then it is possible to turn the winter to your survival advantage, and it can be a potent ally.  Consider Napoleon and Hitler, and what happened when they tried to conquer Russia during the winter.  Fort Drum, home of the 10th Mountain Division, is located on the Tug Hill because the climate and terrain are suited to their mission's training requirements.  They are the guys who fight in the mountains of Afghanistan in the winter, and they are the guys I am counting on to protect my 'neighborhood' in the northeast in a SHTF situation.     

Offline rustyknife

  • Dedicated Contributor
  • ******
  • Posts: 1057
  • Karma: 29
Re: Cold Weather Preps
« Reply #47 on: April 04, 2009, 06:54:55 PM »
Remember, if you are cold put your hat on, if too warm take your hat off. If possible get out of the wind. Hide behind something. When I was a kid living in Eastern Montana there were times that it got to -20 and below with a strong wind to drive it. On the Great Plains there are a lot of places where there are no trees or rocks to hide behind. Several time I remember walking forward as normal then turning around a walking backwards just to give the front of my legs a chance to warm up. While riding my motorcycle through North Dakota one year I stopped and bought a Sunday paper to put in my jacket and pant just to try to keep warm. Think poutside the box, you can laugh about it latter.

Offline Bloodyboots

  • Senior Survivalist
  • ****
  • Posts: 213
  • Karma: 20
Re: Cold Weather Preps
« Reply #48 on: April 05, 2009, 12:14:01 AM »
Coming from Wisconsin, winter survival seems....normal!

Plan on wearing layers of clothing, not that one big thick parka you saw, but 2-3 sweatshirts, a couple of old flannel shirts, and a nice wind breaker should do you until its below zero. Always carry extra hats, gloves, mittens, socks and boots. They get wet, and then they don't keep you warm.

Insulate, insulate insulate. The more you keep heat in, the less you have to heat. Do it now when the weather is getting warm and the stores are having sales.

If your surviving out of doors, BANK YOUR FIRE! A set of large logs or stones behind the Fire will double the heat coming your way. And hang old blankets around your campsite to block the wind, anchor them down and they become decent walls.

If you lose power, First order of business, choose your warmest room in your house, and begin moving bedding and clothes i their for the family to huddle together. Sleep together for warmth. And wear a hat at night, you won't believe the difference it makes.

A primer http://www.wildwoodsurvival.com/survival/winter/index.html
And more http://www.survivaltopics.com/survival/winter-survival/

Lucretius

  • Guest
Re: Cold Weather Preps
« Reply #49 on: April 05, 2009, 01:40:30 AM »
For hard work, such as cutting wood, remove some clothes (warm jacket, hat) or you'll start to sweat, which will make you inner layer clothes wet. Not good.

Good winter jackets have a harness system, that lets you hang the jacket on your back rucksack-style, when working. That way you won't need to lay your jacket on the cold, snowy ground...


Offline ClarkB

  • Senior Survivalist
  • ****
  • Posts: 209
  • Karma: 16
Re: Cold Weather Preps
« Reply #50 on: April 22, 2009, 11:06:56 AM »
These winter photos were both taken within a half mile of where my wife and I (with MIL reluctantly in tow) are moving to this year.  As you can see, we do not have water shortage issues on the Tug Hill Plateau of upstate NY.  This type of snow is tough to deal with, but compared to hurricanes or earthquakes, the snows are predictable and can be 'prepared for'.  Besides the snow, sub-zero temps are also possible, with 10 deg F being common.  As I mentioned earlier, this weather is a deterrent to roving hoards or lone wolves, since they will die if they are forced to remain outside.  We considered moving south, and we looked at Oklahoma, N.C., I used to live in Georgia (military service), and have relatives in Florida; but we decided that our friends, most of our family, and our lake-side mountain camp (in my family for 105 years) were all in NY state, so we will stay here despite the snow and taxes.  We have found that about two weeks stay in warm climes is enough to relieve the winter blahs, so that is our plan. 

Our new place uses wood for heat (has a 120 acre managed woodlot), and we have opportunities for solar, wind, and micro-hydro power generation.  We will grow much of our own food, and possibly grow some for sale at local farmers markets, etc. ('cash' crop).  In the summer this area is spectacularly beautiful and has moderate temperatures in the seventies and eighties.  It is surrounded by some of the best fishing in the U.S. and has plenty of wild deer and turkey.  The winters do SUCK though.  The snowfall can be pretty, and it is even fun to to play in the snow, but a person has to be able to survive the winter before one can progress to 'enjoying' it. 

Consider the "Bug Out Vehicle" thread - some folks are advocates of ATVs, or Gators, or soft top Jeeps for survival vehicles - now consider that you need to travel in these conditions; how far will the ATV get before you freeze?  That is why I prefer the Suzuki Carry micro-trucks as a utility vehicle around the homestead - because they have an enclosed cab and a heater.  Winter up here means that you will experience a guaranteed deadly environment for several months a year.  It make a hot southern day with 100 degree temps, where you can at least find shade, seem easy to endure.



 I frequent Syracuse University, and there are many students from foreign countries such as China, Africa, the Middle East, and South/Central America.  In talking with these students it is always one of two cases:  1) either the first winter is a real wake-up call for them, or 2) they have heard of "Snow City" (the name used around Beijing University for Syracuse) and are dreading what is to come when they arrive in the fall.  Heaven forbid when these grad students are driving in the winter.  Often they have never driven before and they have never seen snow, so it is like bumper cars at an amusement park.   


The flip-side of the equation is what the rest of the year looks like.  Winter, by definition, brings with it the Spring and the Fall, with Summer tucked in between.  The water makes the foliage lush; we just trade the Florida hurricanes for New York winters.  The photos below were taken within a mile of where the above photos were taken.  The difference is February vs. August.  You guess which is which.

 




Offline ClarkB

  • Senior Survivalist
  • ****
  • Posts: 209
  • Karma: 16
Re: Cold Weather Preps
« Reply #51 on: April 22, 2009, 11:11:07 AM »
A shovel is nice to have as it can clear an area and be used to build shelter.  Snow shoes and skis for basic transportation.