Poll

What is the best watch movement type for preppers?

Mechanical
15 (51.7%)
Quartz analog
4 (13.8%)
Digital (including quartz driven)
5 (17.2%)
Smart watch
2 (6.9%)
Other
3 (10.3%)

Total Members Voted: 25

Author Topic: Watch Movements  (Read 15019 times)

Offline Carl

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Re: Watch Movements
« Reply #30 on: June 07, 2015, 11:33:51 AM »
My cesium watch is already back at the shop...my favorite,besides a sundial,is a FOSSIL self winding movement that I have worn for the last 25 rough years or so and it just will not quit...it is just Hours Minute Second with no day-date though it has a rotating Divers bezel.

Offline iam4liberty

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Re: Watch Movements
« Reply #31 on: June 17, 2015, 07:42:40 PM »
I mentioned the Orient brand above.  Some new reviews have come out which suggest the newer updated models may be worth another look.   See here for example: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=4qhvs8WNd44&feature=youtu.be

Offline iam4liberty

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Re: Watch Movements
« Reply #32 on: January 25, 2016, 07:10:17 PM »
Some really interesting new smart watches are coming out which may have some prepper value.  Unlike first generation smart watches which are dependent on a smart phone for getting time,these new ones work indepentally more like traditional watches.  Also they have become much more robust, both to imoact and water.  Good examples are certain models from the Garmin GPS line of watches:

http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2016/01/garmin-releases-hardcore-tactix-bravo-gps-watch-adds-hrm-to-fenix-3/

Does this change anyone's opinion on smart watches?



Offline FreeLancer

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Re: Watch Movements
« Reply #33 on: January 24, 2017, 12:16:02 AM »
First choice is my auto-setting G-Shock with digital/analog display and solar power.  Second choice is my trusty old quartz Timex.

I have a nice Suunto with altimeter and compass, but it's huge and sucks batteries. 

Mechanicals are way too big, too expensive, and too inaccurate for me, but I got one in a drawer....just in case I feel the need to divide my miserable existence down to the second when the world's all gone to hell.

My G-Shock backlight started turning on intermittently when handling the case, so I went looking for something new. I love the analog display, solar power, and radio time sync that ensures the date/time is always accurate without any intervention from me. Even with hard use the analog hands have always been dead accurate, but I hate the lack of a second hand, which necessitates a digital display and extra buttons to navigate the menu systems. I rarely use the alarm, timer, or stop watch features, but I do like the ability to change time zones without altering the actual time. I also find the armored chunkiness of the G more of a bug than a feature after wearing it for a bunch of years, because it won't fit under cuff easily and it draws attention.

When evaluating what I value most in a watch, I came up with the following:

It must have an easy to read, uncluttered, analog display with a second hand, with minimal controls or complications and no extra digital display.  All I need in a wristwatch is to be able to tell time with a glance and know it's accurate. For everything else I have an iPhone in my pocket that is way more versatile and powerful.

Nothing short of quartz accurracy, which is 15 seconds per month at even the very lowest end of the market.  Mechanical movements can't compete with that.

No need to adjust the date at the end of the month or move the hour back and forth for DST.

No battery changes.

Minimal weight and profile. Inconspicuous.

No buckles to fasten or rubber straps to break.


Believe it or not, I couldn't find anything that met all those criteria.  Until I stumbled on a Casio Oceanus model and had it shipped from Japan.  It is basically the G-Shock's analog Tough Movement, solar, and radio time synch all stuffed into an understated titanium and sapphire package that has all the flash of a basic Citizen Eco-Drive. And it handles time zones easier and more intuitively than running through menus on my old G, and the date numbers never have to be advanced at the end of February, plus they instantly snap to the next date at midnight.

It's absolutely perfect. Everything I need, nothing that I don't.  Except, in the absence of radio signals it reverts back to being no more accurate than a $12 plastic Casio.

Which is how I stumbled across the Grand Seiko 9F analog quartz movement that is accurate to <10 seconds per year. Not per month, less than 10 seconds over a whole year!  My Orient automatic gains 6 seconds per day. The 9F is not solar and needs a battery change every 3 years, and it won't adjust itself for date and DST issues. Still, that's impressively accurate, better than the much larger Seiko Marine Chronometers used for celestial navigation from just a few decades ago. I kinda think I need one.

Offline FreeLancer

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Re: Watch Movements
« Reply #34 on: January 24, 2017, 12:23:03 PM »
On a related topic, I was asked by a prepper buddy who is a lurker here what I thought was the best type of automatic for him.  He is a businessman with an office job and does a lot of networking.  He plans to have only one watch.  I thought I would post my initial thoughts and see if anyone has other thoughts.  To my way of thinking a classic diver watch would be the best choice.  It coordinates well from shorts and a t-shirt all the way to business attire and even black tie.  Yet they tend to be built more substantially than other watches (e.g. thicker crystal and case).  And they have several valuable features:

  • Second readable time
  • Luminous hands (for dark)
  • Water resistance to 100+ meters
  • Bezel for countdown and compass functions

He asked for makes/models that would tend to hold value over time.  Here was my short list (running from "James Bond" investment grade luxury watches down to entry level.  Here they all are with now popular blue dials:

Rolex Submariner Date ($10K)


Omega Seamaster ($2.5K)

Seiko Sport 5 Marine ($300)


Vostok Amphibia w/ classic scuba dude ($75)


Both the Seiko and the Vostok can be cost effectively modified to be exactly like the user wants while the Rolex and Omega would lose value if this was done.


Also note, that I didn't include Orient or Invicta brands as they do not have a strong record for holding their value.

Any other thoughts?


It's a couple years late, but I just learned about this Grand Seiko Diver that uses the high accuracy thermocompensated 9F quartz movement.  It's $4k and runs three years between battery changes and the movement has 50 year maintenance interval.  Accurate to about half a minute between battery changes.


Offline Ralph

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Re: Watch Movements
« Reply #35 on: January 24, 2017, 12:43:41 PM »
I never put much thought into 'time' in my kits. I just put some used  black Casio watches in my kits. After some scratches from work and even a broken band on one or two held in the kit with a tether cord they have been repurposed. Light, long lasting battery, accurate and cheap. I like the mechanics of a good windup or self winding watch but I think a digital is better if banged or dropped. I've never had a digital fail.

Offline iam4liberty

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Re: Watch Movements
« Reply #36 on: January 24, 2017, 06:37:31 PM »
Which is how I stumbled across the Grand Seiko 9F analog quartz movement that is accurate to <10 seconds per year. Not per month, less than 10 seconds over a whole year!...  I kinda think I need one.

The Grand Seiko is one of the few quartz watches which has the potential to gain value over time.  It is simply outstanding.

The age of ultra high accuracy quartz watches is on us.  The UHF 262 kHz technology of Bulova is very impressive at its price point.  See here for accuracy test: https://youtube.com/watch?v=uhEzYiM9Tx0.  A good "clean" American style design is their Military which can be found for about $125 retail:



Offline Ralph

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Re: Watch Movements
« Reply #37 on: January 26, 2017, 11:20:11 AM »
A sundial thread sounds interesting, is there some way to take a poll of forum users to guage how many people might be interested? I have a pocket transit I bought when I got interested in dials. I have to read the manual to relearn how to use it. Somewhat expensive they can do a lot with no batteries. I do remember you can use it to site the top of a tree and calculate it's height, trig tables are right on the transit! It may work for navigation, it was made to work with maps. I'll post more about it after I play around with mine. It is made by Brunton (cant recall model offhand) if anyone wants to look into one. They even look neat, various scales, dials, bubble levels, pointers ...

Offline iam4liberty

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Re: Watch Movements
« Reply #38 on: October 07, 2018, 08:36:09 PM »
Just giving an update.  To celebrate their 100th anniversary, citizen is releasing a new quartz movement.  It is solar powered (but can run for six months without charge), and shock proof.  But the most incredible aspect for preppers is its standalone accuracy, +/-1 second per year.  My hope is they embed it in a titanium case with modern mineral glass, antimagnetic proofing, and 200m+ water resistance.  This will make it an ideal prepper watch, simplifying navigation, team coordination, and other tasks.  This isnt loss on media, dubbing it the "apocalypse watch".  As of now we have only seen it in their prototype show pocket watch form.  But we should soon be hearing more details as to the details on tge various watch models soon.

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-04-13/citizen-s-hyper-accurate-quartz-watch-is-ready-for-the-apocalypse

Citizen’s Hyper-Accurate Quartz Watch Is Ready for the Apocalypse
It’s solar-powered and accurate to ±1 second per year, all without needing a functioning GPS or radio waves.
« Last Edit: October 07, 2018, 08:44:00 PM by iam4liberty »

Offline FreeLancer

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Re: Watch Movements
« Reply #39 on: October 07, 2018, 09:07:32 PM »
As of now we have only seen it in their prototype show pocket watch form. 

Wow!  I'm not a pocket watch guy but I'd buy that one......




If they put it in a little Marine Chronometer style case and I'd probably buy two.




Offline iam4liberty

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Re: Watch Movements
« Reply #40 on: October 07, 2018, 10:04:28 PM »
It is stunningly beautiful in operation. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3TxiNSXQR88

It is like they took the ellegance of the samurai sword and turned it into a time piece.  The japanese artisans definitely have an eye for grace and precision.