Author Topic: Interesting observations along the "Mormon corridor"...  (Read 8026 times)

Offline Amerigo

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Interesting observations along the "Mormon corridor"...
« on: October 09, 2009, 03:05:25 PM »
I think the preparedness mentality is very interesting in Utah - and I'd imagine it's somewhat the same in areas of Arizona and Idaho that have a high density of Mormons.  Growing up, it was common for me and all my cousins to get sleeping bags, portable heaters, mess kits, 72-hour kits, etc, from my grandparents.  Growing up, the "food storage room" was a designated room just like a bathroom or bedroom.  For a wedding gift, my parents gave me a 55 gallon drum for water storage.  Today, I drive down the freeway and see billboards advertising emergency preparedness or food storage topics - and it's a nice young mother on the billboard, not a crazy guy wearing a tin-foil hat.  The ladies at church get together and go in on bulk-order quantities of hand wheat grinders.  Every month in the church pamphlet, there is a "What to do this month to prepare" flyer.

The interesting thing is that while many of these people seem to be getting prepared, and are actually taking the steps to do so, it still seems like they have their head stuck in the sand.  (My general opinion - YMMV).  It's kind of like they just prepare because that's how the culture is - and because preparedness is what leaders of the LDS church have always suggested and stressed.  You'd think that in this type of atmosphere, a "modern survivalist" would be welcomed... but when I talk to friends and family about modern survivalism, most of them think I'm nuts.  Even when I soften it up and give it a "self-suffiency" spin, they still think it's weird.  I've asked them, "If there is a situation that results in the food supply being disrupted and/or destroyed for one entire year, what do you think society is going to look like?"  They haven't really ever considered it, and don't think it's a possibility that society could breakdown.  So why the year's supply of food?  (Although if LDS church leaders were suggesting a year's supply of ammo in addition to the food, things with the Feds could turn ugly real fast!)

So for those modern survivalists who have friends or family who are LDS, how have you approached this subject?  Do you bring any of it up, or just figure that they are further along the road than most people, so why rock the boat?  Any thoughts?


NOTE:  This post is not meant to be derogatory towards Mormons at all.  I am one after all.  :)  
« Last Edit: October 09, 2009, 03:08:22 PM by Amerigo »

Offline Pathfinder

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Re: Interesting observations along the "Mormon corridor"...
« Reply #1 on: October 09, 2009, 03:14:18 PM »
Great first post, Amerigo - your first +1.

A couple of thoughts along the "why" question.

1. Most people have been trained to be clueless sheep - they do what the neighbors do or what they see on TV and decide that's what they want
2. Very few people (relatively speaking) really "get it" (prepping and why)
3. Prepping - to be successful - needs to be a lifestyle, not a "gotta get this done this week" kinda thing - and that confuses people trained to be consumers and credit-a-holics
4. Hard times are coming, and you will see the scales start falling from some peoples' eyes - the rest sadly probably won't make it

I try to teach the way I learn - by example - keeping specifics of what I have to a necessary few. I am seriously thinking of approaching my new church about hosting an early winter prep conference/seminar in the church to see what kind of interest there is.

Offline ZedHead

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Re: Interesting observations along the "Mormon corridor"...
« Reply #2 on: October 09, 2009, 10:26:06 PM »
LDS guy here. From my experience, much of the preparedness mindset comes from the Prophet's counsel to store a year's worth of food for everyone in your family. There is also a heavy influence from Boy Scouts.

Also in the Church, young folks participate in youth groups where they often go camping, hiking, etc. Many of the gifts I received growing up were to help get me the gear I needed for these events.

Many of my friends and family members seem to have a few areas of "expertise' where they excel at certain issues. These could be; car camping, backpacking, hunting, horseback riding, ATV's, firearms etc. Often i will see those who are strong in a few areas, but lack strongly in others.

I have been making goals and "feeling out" others in the family, neighborhood, and church group who seem to be more interested in becoming a more well rounded prepper and are willing to discuss these issues.

A lot of my acquaintances would and do call me a"prep expert," though I am far from it. Finding ways to connect others and learn from them is key.

Offline sclindah

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Re: Interesting observations along the "Mormon corridor"...
« Reply #3 on: October 10, 2009, 06:52:21 PM »
I'm an RSP in South Carolina.  We have always "prepped" although I never called us that.  We had several "poverty years" early in our marriage and so food storage and gardening when we've lived on it so it has always been part of our lifestyle.  However, the last couple of years, we have felt an urgency to get better prepared even more.  We have enlarged our garden, are building a greenhouse so we can always have our own fresh food. I have done  a lot more canning so we are well stocked. 

We have also followed the counsel to avoid debt and have none, not even our home owed to someone else. 

I do a lot of teaching preparedness, budgeting and debt reduction to various congregations around and have had a lot of classes in our ward (like teaching applesauce this week) to help prepare our  families.  I've had some people along the way tell me they'd come to my house (I tell them I only have food for my family). 

But I do know there are several in each ward (congregation) that have taken counsel and actively work on preparedness in many ways.  I think a lot of other people have done some "prepping" of some point. Many are very interested in being more self-sufficient but it's so different than the lifestyles of the world and if they haven't been raised with preparedness, they just are unsure on how to do thing differently.   Many want to learn and are trying to get started.  Others worry about it  and debt (especially lately) but there is the conflict of people in the world's way of thinking that nothing bad will really happen, don't want to think about bad things happening, and it's too overwhelming to think about.  I think it's part of the being in the world of convenience foods and not really think preparedness would ever be needed.   It's like the world's perspective versus the counsel we've been given for so many years to be prepared.  I think this has been a wake up call to so very many people!

From visits to the LDS Family Canning Center this year and how busy they have been, I think more are trying to get a clue!

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Re: Interesting observations along the "Mormon corridor"...
« Reply #4 on: October 11, 2009, 08:47:48 PM »
Yes, there are many people who purchase a year supply of food storage simply because they are following what the church says.  Some of them know how to use the supplies that they have, and many do not.  Personally I see it as a difference in following the letter of the law and the meaning of it.  I also think that having a year supply of food is a measurable and attainable goal where telling people to become preppers is a little more difficult to accomplish.

I've been working with my parents for the past year trying to convince them that there is more to "a year supply of food" than just a year supply of food.  I convinced him to get an AR-15 and a supply of ammo and have since been working on other areas such as having a fuel supply and silver/gold on hand.  Its been a long road, but I finally felt like I was getting somewhere the other day when my dad called me up asking about generators in case of a long term power outage.  Regardless of whether or not a generator is the best option, I finally felt like I was making real progress in getting him to think about preparing beyond just food.  What got me there was asking questions like what you said about society in a situation where we need a year supply of food.

Point being, it's a process.  I've been working at it for a long time and really didn't think I was getting very far until lately.  There is also a part of the LDS population that believe that as long as they follow exactly what they are told (year supply of food) they will be protected no matter what.  Those individuals are almost a lost cause in regards to convincing them that they need to do more unless the church tells them to explicitly.  I tend to believe "God helps those who help themselves", but that's just me.

Offline Ian Adams

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Re: Interesting observations along the "Mormon corridor"...
« Reply #5 on: October 12, 2009, 09:53:33 AM »
Not to hijack a thread or anything but I am curious, why the LDS emphasis on food storage?  Is there a theological basis?  I do not know much about the Church, outside of their great genealogical resources which I use regularly, and am just curious.

Offline sclindah

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Re: Interesting observations along the "Mormon corridor"...
« Reply #6 on: October 12, 2009, 01:29:39 PM »
In our church, we have been counseled  since before I was born to be self-sufficient and prepare for emergencies, avoid debt and live the motto: "If ye are prepared, ye shall not fear."

Our church feels like we cannot serve and help others if we don't prepare to meet our own needs and that of our family.   We also feel like it doesn't have to be a huge catastrophe but it could be losing our jobs, nature or health emergencies where we need to prepare to help our families and children.

Not to be preachy but for an example of the type of counsel we have been given from our church leaders, here is a quote given  in 2005

“What (calamities) we have experienced in the past was all foretold, and the end is not yet. Just as there have been calamities in the past, we expect more in the future. What do we do? Someone has said it was not raining when Noah built the ark. But he built it, and the rains came…We can heed warnings…We are told by seismologists that the Salt Lake Valley is a potential earthquake zone…We have built grain storage and storehouses and stocked them with the necessities of life in the event of a disaster. But the best storehouse is the family storeroom. In words of revelation the Lord has said, “Organize yourselves; prepare every needful thing” (D&C 109:8 ). Our people for three-quarters of a century have been counseled and encouraged to make such preparation as will assure survival should a calamity come. We can set aside some water, basic food, medicine, and clothing to keep us warm. We ought to have a little money laid aside in case of a rainy day…” This talk was given exactly seven years from the date that President Hinckley first gave (as I call it) his “seven years of plenty talk.” In it he again mentioned the dream of Pharaoh when he said, “Let us never lose sight of the dream of Pharaoh concerning the fat cattle and the lean, the full ears of corn and the blasted ears, the meaning of which was interpreted by Joseph to indicate years of plenty and years of scarcity.”  President Hinckley in October Conference in 2005.

Offline daveinmichigan

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Re: Interesting observations along the "Mormon corridor"...
« Reply #7 on: October 12, 2009, 01:52:01 PM »
Welcome...and a great post to start off with too!

Offline Morning Sunshine

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Re: Interesting observations along the "Mormon corridor"...
« Reply #8 on: October 12, 2009, 03:49:37 PM »
Not to hijack a thread or anything but I am curious, why the LDS emphasis on food storage?  Is there a theological basis?  I do not know much about the Church, outside of their great genealogical resources which I use regularly, and am just curious.
I think there are two reasons.  sclindah has pointed out one of the reasons.  I think it is the main reason most LDS members "prep" - the council to have a year's supply of food; the handouts at church detailing what to buy that month to get a year's supply (it is VOLUNTARY, but the info is handed out); the mini-articles in the church magazine about how to stock a 72-hour kit; the women's group meetings where people bring dishes made from their food storage; the lessons in sunday meetings about staying out of debt and managing money wisely, etc.

I think the other reason is more subconscious, more part of the culture of the LDS people.  and that means time for a history lesson  ;D (sorry, history is my thing, and I believe that knowing the past helps to understand the present and predict the future)
the church was organized on April 6, 1830.  By June 27, 1844, when the prophet Joseph Smith was killed (we call it the Martyrdom), the early members had been driven out of NY, Ohio, and Missouri (Missouri at gunpoint and without the majority of their possessions in mid-winter).  By 1846, those still in Illinois were driven across the Mississippi into Iowa, again forced out of their homes with only what they could carry.
They left the country and headed for Mexico, since the US gov't would not protect them nor prosecute those that persecuted them.  By the time they made it to the Salt Lake Valley, however, the Mexican war was over, and the SL valley was US territory.  Once again, they planned out a city, like they had done in MO and IL, built homes, started another Temple (a very important edifice to Latter-Day saints), and started to spread/settle communities scattered over present-day Utah, Idaho, Nevada, California, Arizona, and some parts of Wyoming, New Mexico, and Colorado.  Towns in Utah were settled by groups sent out specifically to settle an area.  10-12 families sent to a valley and told to build a town, plant crops, and raise livestock.  Those early settlements were not only tied together that way, but also isolated geographically from other settlements and people.  They HAD to work together.
The leader at the time, President and Prophet Brigham Young was determined to make the Saints independent and self-sufficient: He organized settlers to plant cotton in the south part of Utah (still called Dixie); he had folks experimenting with growing silk worms; the southern part of the Salt Lake valley was planted with sugar beets (still a part of the cultural heritage there); all sorts of crops were planted and trades followed (including tobacco and breweries - before the church decided to follow the Word of Wisdom, which bans those).  Basically Brigham Young wanted the people to not be reliant on outsiders for necessities or luxuries. 
in 1857, the US gov't decided to attack the Saints again.  Wikipedia has a good synopsis of this at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Utah_War
basically, the first 70 years of the church's existence pitted the Early Mormons against, well, everyone in the US, and the early Saints had to be self and inter-dependent.  Basically a "prepper" mindset as a church and region.
By the time Utah joined the rest of the country politically and culturally, it was the 1900's.  One generation later, the Great Depression hit, and again, the "prepper" mentality was part of the culture.


Doctrinally, we are counciled to prepare for our families "every needful thing" (Doctrine and Covenants 88:119).  Including physical preparations and skills.  The church is very much into education, not just the book-learning, but the hands-on skill set learning as well.  There are "classes" in the local congregations on how to can, garden, sew, soap, cook with dutch ovens; many wards and stakes (the local congregations) have annual campouts and the church heavily supports the Boy Scouts.  The Young Women (12-18) have yearly week-long campouts as well, including hikes, compass-reading, fire-building, outdoor cooking, etc. 
We have a deep, unspoken belief that our trials as a church and as a people are not over.  we use these activities as fun social events, but they are important skill builders too.
so, in summary, it is more than "a year's supply," it is our history, our culture, and our future.

Offline Ian Adams

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Re: Interesting observations along the "Mormon corridor"...
« Reply #9 on: October 12, 2009, 06:38:59 PM »
sclindah and morning sunshine, thank you for the very informative posts.  I really enjoy learning things like this.

Offline Cacinok

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Re: Interesting observations along the "Mormon corridor"...
« Reply #10 on: October 13, 2009, 10:13:51 AM »
what this goes to show, is that Mormons are subject to what's called "contingency traps", just as everybody else.  this happens a lot w/ things like smoking, exercise, saving money, etc.  take exercise, for example, we all know that there are long term gains of exercising.  we also know that there are short term pains (e.g., physical pain, time that could be spent doing other things).  a contingency trap exists where avoiding the short term pains outweighs the long term (often distant future) gains.  applying this to prepping, the long term benefit of being prepared for emergencies is outweighed by the immediate short term gain of avoiding the cost, in time and money (and possibly reputation) of prepping.

i forget which LDS prophet it was that said something to the effect that if the Lord wanted to test the Saints obedience, He would simply need to allow a year long famine to occur. 

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Re: Interesting observations along the "Mormon corridor"...
« Reply #11 on: October 13, 2009, 07:49:09 PM »
I am curious, are the classes just for members of the church or are outsiders welcome? 

Offline Morning Sunshine

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Re: Interesting observations along the "Mormon corridor"...
« Reply #12 on: October 13, 2009, 08:32:46 PM »
I am curious, are the classes just for members of the church or are outsiders welcome? 

Every one is welcome.

the caveat is that the classes are all organized on a local level.  I have lived in local congregations where "prepping" (we don't call it that) activities are mentioned once a year, and others where it is a monthly thing.  It kind of depends on the ladies in the area and their interests.  Your best bet would be to show up at the local meeting house (you can find it in the phone book under "The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints."  They would love to see you on a Sunday morning  ;) but if you are not up for that, I would recommend a weekday evening, Tuesday or Wednesday some time between 6 and 8.  If there is a Stake Center in your area, Thursday nights are also good.  Anyway, show up and ask who the Stake or ward Preparedness Specialisth is, and they will (usually - there are sometimes sour apples; I have never met one, but people are people!) get you in contact with that person who can help find out what the local wards are doing on this front.

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Re: Interesting observations along the "Mormon corridor"...
« Reply #13 on: October 13, 2009, 09:47:52 PM »
Every one is welcome.

the caveat is that the classes are all organized on a local level.  I have lived in local congregations where "prepping" (we don't call it that) activities are mentioned once a year, and others where it is a monthly thing.  It kind of depends on the ladies in the area and their interests.  Your best bet would be to show up at the local meeting house (you can find it in the phone book under "The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints."  They would love to see you on a Sunday morning  ;) but if you are not up for that, I would recommend a weekday evening, Tuesday or Wednesday some time between 6 and 8.  If there is a Stake Center in your area, Thursday nights are also good.  Anyway, show up and ask who the Stake or ward Preparedness Specialisth is, and they will (usually - there are sometimes sour apples; I have never met one, but people are people!) get you in contact with that person who can help find out what the local wards are doing on this front.

Thank you.  Sundays would probably be difficult unless they have later in the day services.  I am already in worship from about 9am to about 1pm.   I will definatley head out on another day.

Offline Harold J. Forbes

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Re: Interesting observations along the "Mormon corridor"...
« Reply #14 on: October 16, 2009, 11:23:40 AM »
As a LDS convert, I'll provide my two cents on this, although I will caution that I 1) did not grow up in the LDS church and 2) have never lived in (or even been to) Utah.

My view is that despite the counsel we have received about preparedness, food storage, etc., very few members actually heed the counsel and even fewer understand the concepts behind it. A good number (~60%) probably have the 72-hour kit/BOB since that is a pretty easy subject for an evening activity, but far fewer have one year or even three months of food storage. Of those, there are a good number that took the checklist and bought at least a portion of what the guidance said they needed, but have no idea how to cook with the stuff. They just store the food because the church leaders told them they should.

I just don't think we do a good job in the church of teaching the "why" behind food storage and more extensive preps. In this part of the country most everyone can understand the 72-hour kit because of hurricane evacuations, but many have trouble grasping why they would ever need anything more than 72 hours. Opening people's eyes to the threats around us and teaching how these preps are good for a number of different emergencies, whether large-scale or as simple as losing a job, is ultimately how we get more of our own onboard. Local church leaders need to spend more time on the "why" than the "how".

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Re: Interesting observations along the "Mormon corridor"...
« Reply #15 on: October 28, 2009, 04:04:30 PM »
As a LDS convert, I'll provide my two cents on this, although I will caution that I 1) did not grow up in the LDS church and 2) have never lived in (or even been to) Utah.

My view is that despite the counsel we have received about preparedness, food storage, etc., very few members actually heed the counsel and even fewer understand the concepts behind it. A good number (~60%) probably have the 72-hour kit/BOB since that is a pretty easy subject for an evening activity, but far fewer have one year or even three months of food storage. Of those, there are a good number that took the checklist and bought at least a portion of what the guidance said they needed, but have no idea how to cook with the stuff. They just store the food because the church leaders told them they should.

I just don't think we do a good job in the church of teaching the "why" behind food storage and more extensive preps. In this part of the country most everyone can understand the 72-hour kit because of hurricane evacuations, but many have trouble grasping why they would ever need anything more than 72 hours. Opening people's eyes to the threats around us and teaching how these preps are good for a number of different emergencies, whether large-scale or as simple as losing a job, is ultimately how we get more of our own onboard. Local church leaders need to spend more time on the "why" than the "how".

Amen to that!

Offline Cacinok

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Re: Interesting observations along the "Mormon corridor"...
« Reply #16 on: October 29, 2009, 12:34:55 PM »
As a LDS convert, I'll provide my two cents on this, although I will caution that I 1) did not grow up in the LDS church and 2) have never lived in (or even been to) Utah.

My view is that despite the counsel we have received about preparedness, food storage, etc., very few members actually heed the counsel and even fewer understand the concepts behind it. A good number (~60%) probably have the 72-hour kit/BOB since that is a pretty easy subject for an evening activity, but far fewer have one year or even three months of food storage. Of those, there are a good number that took the checklist and bought at least a portion of what the guidance said they needed, but have no idea how to cook with the stuff. They just store the food because the church leaders told them they should.

I just don't think we do a good job in the church of teaching the "why" behind food storage and more extensive preps. In this part of the country most everyone can understand the 72-hour kit because of hurricane evacuations, but many have trouble grasping why they would ever need anything more than 72 hours. Opening people's eyes to the threats around us and teaching how these preps are good for a number of different emergencies, whether large-scale or as simple as losing a job, is ultimately how we get more of our own onboard. Local church leaders need to spend more time on the "why" than the "how".

i don't think it's a case of not doing a good job of teaching the "why", but moreso that things haven't gone terribly wrong, on a large scale and for an extended duration, in the US for a very long time.  it's been milk and honey since at least the 70s and even then, depending on who you ask, the 70s weren't that bad.  my wife is the food storage coordinator for our ward, and my folks just finished a mission at the cannery in the NW.  a year ago members of the church were spooked and there was a huge demand for food storage.  lately people have become ambivalent and while some are still very concerned, most have went back to life as usual. 

in a way, prepping is like exercising.  the immediate short term reward for avoiding the inconvenience of doing it is greater than the distant, long term, risk of not doing it.  in behavioral terms it's called a contingency trap.   

Offline herbdoc

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Re: Interesting observations along the "Mormon corridor"...
« Reply #17 on: October 30, 2009, 11:38:05 AM »
In all cultures and communities not everyone hears what is being said.  Those of us that are preppers hear what others may not, even though we're reading out of the same book.  "He who has ears to hear" sees the writing on the wall and it all makes sense and fits.  Some wards in the LDS church, as mentioned, are very organized with neighborhood that hold regular preparedness meeting, others don't.  Some of us focus on preparedness, sustainability and survival from every possible angle and others think we are nuts. 

So at this point, the joy is in the journey - and for us prepping and learning new skills and meeting new friends is kinda fun.

Moving from Northern California to Utah a year and a half ago, has been a big cultural change.  But one that we have been happy with.

By the way for those in Region 7, we have started a Modern Homesteading Group that meets once a month.  The intent is to teach and learn skills that will improve the quality of our lives "if times get tough or even if they don't."  You can find out more about this in the Region 7 area of the forum.

herbdoc

Offline Cacinok

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Re: Interesting observations along the "Mormon corridor"...
« Reply #18 on: November 01, 2009, 02:52:35 PM »
In all cultures and communities not everyone hears what is being said.  Those of us that are preppers hear what others may not, even though we're reading out of the same book.  "He who has ears to hear" sees the writing on the wall and it all makes sense and fits.  Some wards in the LDS church, as mentioned, are very organized with neighborhood that hold regular preparedness meeting, others don't.  Some of us focus on preparedness, sustainability and survival from every possible angle and others think we are nuts. 

So at this point, the joy is in the journey - and for us prepping and learning new skills and meeting new friends is kinda fun.

Moving from Northern California to Utah a year and a half ago, has been a big cultural change.  But one that we have been happy with.

By the way for those in Region 7, we have started a Modern Homesteading Group that meets once a month.  The intent is to teach and learn skills that will improve the quality of our lives "if times get tough or even if they don't."  You can find out more about this in the Region 7 area of the forum.

herbdoc

lol.  had to chortle at the part in red.  i know what you meant, but lol'd anyway.

i went from seattle to utah, via idaho, for undergrad and it is indeed a different culture.  now if you wanna talk culture shock, move to baton rouge.  spent a couple of years there, quite the interesting place.

Offline Harold J. Forbes

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Re: Interesting observations along the "Mormon corridor"...
« Reply #19 on: November 02, 2009, 03:21:14 PM »
i went from seattle to utah, via idaho, for undergrad and it is indeed a different culture.  now if you wanna talk culture shock, move to baton rouge.  spent a couple of years there, quite the interesting place.

As a Baton Rouge native, I'll assume you meant that in a positive way.  :D

I can see where as a LDS you might find a culture of free-flowing booze and crazy Cajuns shocking, but there are some great people in that area, both members and non-members. And not to mention Baton Rouge has some of the best food you will ever eat (although I'll give props to Utah for creativity with Jell-o). As a member I would certainly consider moving back to Baton Rouge before I would consider moving to Utah.

Offline Cacinok

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Re: Interesting observations along the "Mormon corridor"...
« Reply #20 on: November 02, 2009, 04:08:09 PM »
As a Baton Rouge native, I'll assume you meant that in a positive way.  :D

I can see where as a LDS you might find a culture of free-flowing booze and crazy Cajuns shocking, but there are some great people in that area, both members and non-members. And not to mention Baton Rouge has some of the best food you will ever eat (although I'll give props to Utah for creativity with Jell-o). As a member I would certainly consider moving back to Baton Rouge before I would consider moving to Utah.
rofl @ the jello comment.  of course i meant that in a positive way. ;)  i actually saw more free flowing booze in MN, where i worked on my master's degree, so that wasn't really a factor.

i did love the food there, so much so that i married a gal from baton rouge, so she could cook, cajun style, for me for the rest of my life (i'm glad she doesn't read this forum, that comment might get me in trouble).  she was born and raised around baton rouge.  her paw paw was a genuine self proclaimed coon-ass.  he was raised in the swamps and had all kinds of interesting stories.  iirc, the second date i took my wife on was canoeing in the swamps - good times.

i loved the culture, food, architecture and history in that area.  most of the people were great, but i hated the ignorance and lack of willingness of many people to improve their lot in life.  a lot of people had no desire to get out of the slums, white or black. color).

i worked juvenile probation, so i got to see the underbelly of baton rouge.  got to see people steal electricity straight from the power poles, and share it w/ their neighbors, same idea w/ cable.  i hadn't seen that since i was in south america.  had a friend shot, never had that happen before.  had a neighbor murdered by his gay lover that was 20 years his junior, never had that happen before either.  the gay mardi gras parade in baton rouge went right in front of my apartment window - that was disturbing.  i'd never seen so much corruption in the state and local .gov's 'til i got down there.  they even have buildings at LSU named after corrupt governors who stole millions from the state.  i worked w/ the red cross and fema during the flooding in '01, that was an interesting experience to say the least, i had a lot of fun.

i grew up around seattle, lived in six different states, visited 20 or 30 others, so i'd say my life wasn't sheltered, but louisiana was a whole different world.  overall i enjoyed my brief couple of years there, however.

utah would not be my first choice either, even though i have tons of family still there. 
« Last Edit: November 02, 2009, 04:11:57 PM by Cacinok »

Offline TexDaddy

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Re: Interesting observations along the "Mormon corridor"...
« Reply #21 on: November 02, 2009, 09:25:30 PM »
Corrupt Governor? In Louisiana? Can you say Huey P. Long? Of course, the integrity of some of our Governors has been questioned. ;D

Offline Sister Wolf

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Re: Interesting observations along the "Mormon corridor"...
« Reply #22 on: November 02, 2009, 10:55:17 PM »
Wussumatter with Utah?  I love it there!  I especially love Salt Lake in the Fall.  SO PRETTY.  And the people there are plenty nice!

Never been to Louisiana, but I'm betting I'd love it there too.  Gay parades?  Government corruption?  Hell, I'm USED to that.  But I bet the food is a lot better down there, and that's somethin', right?

Course... It's hard not to love it somewhere else when yer from California.

But my most favoritest state ever in the history of states (so far) is Missouri.  Food's downright heavenly.  The radio station choices are "country" "other country" and "some more country".  People are all like "hey hun, how ya doin'?  Y'all come back now - real soon!" And there are RIVERS there!  REAL ones!  With water!

And now the thread is properly hijacked.  Sorry to the original poster!

Offline Cacinok

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Re: Interesting observations along the "Mormon corridor"...
« Reply #23 on: November 04, 2009, 11:06:54 AM »
Wussumatter with Utah?  I love it there!  I especially love Salt Lake in the Fall.  SO PRETTY.  And the people there are plenty nice!

Never been to Louisiana, but I'm betting I'd love it there too.  Gay parades?  Government corruption?  Hell, I'm USED to that.  But I bet the food is a lot better down there, and that's somethin', right?

Course... It's hard not to love it somewhere else when yer from California.

But my most favoritest state ever in the history of states (so far) is Missouri.  Food's downright heavenly.  The radio station choices are "country" "other country" and "some more country".  People are all like "hey hun, how ya doin'?  Y'all come back now - real soon!" And there are RIVERS there!  REAL ones!  With water!

And now the thread is properly hijacked.  Sorry to the original poster!

to further the hijack, i didn't say anything was wrong w/ utah, per se, just that it wouldn't be my first choice.  if i were required to pick something i disliked, it'd probably be that there's too many momons.  and yes i am one, but it's that old maxim too much of a good thing can be a bad thing.  i doubt i'd like vatican city either.

now to get it back on track.  as briefly discussed earlier, the strength the mormons would have would be the tight knit and already established group.  all adult members of the church are tasked w/ being aware of, if not helping out, certain other members of the church.  for example, there are two male members of the church that check in w/ me and my family once a month, sometimes more, to see if all is well.  there are also to females who check in on my wife monthly and often weekly, to see if she needs anything. 

the church leadership can quickly disseminate info simply by passing it down through this setup. 


Offline MD3C

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Re: Interesting observations along the "Mormon corridor"...
« Reply #24 on: November 09, 2009, 03:46:36 PM »
In know that the church was always there, and ready to help.
I also knew that it was always better to take care of yourself, and yours before asking for help.
A funny church thing:
I was sick/dieing in 1994. The Elders Quorum came out and built a well house for the family.
Very nice, and greateful for it, and them.
So I recovered, and got ill again.
In fun (believing that I might die) I asked my wife if she thought she needed a porch?
We both laughed.
I'm here, still no porch:)
M

Offline BT7

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Re: Interesting observations along the "Mormon corridor"...
« Reply #25 on: December 20, 2009, 07:54:33 AM »
Also keep in mind that the local congregation ("ward," and up a level, the "stake") has a substantial impact on the topics dicussed, etc.  So the level of discussion and preparedness also varies from location to location.  I know we have discussed aspects of why, how, when, etc. because I have given at least two lessons on the topic.  I know we are not alone.

Offline Sister Wolf

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Re: Interesting observations along the "Mormon corridor"...
« Reply #26 on: December 20, 2009, 12:52:11 PM »
"Lessons" about it?  What's that, like missionary stuff, or something to do with a group within the church, or..?

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Re: Interesting observations along the "Mormon corridor"...
« Reply #27 on: December 27, 2009, 11:49:12 AM »
Not to hijack a thread or anything but I am curious, why the LDS emphasis on food storage?  Is there a theological basis?  I do not know much about the Church, outside of their great genealogical resources which I use regularly, and am just curious.

If you read the history of the Mormons, you will understand that they learned by experience what they had to do to survive. Check this out: http://www.lds.org/gospellibrary/pioneer/02_Nauvoo.html
« Last Edit: December 27, 2009, 05:08:14 PM by Sister Wolf »