Author Topic: Yaesu FT-897D Opinions?  (Read 22359 times)

Offline Diablo

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Yaesu FT-897D Opinions?
« on: January 23, 2010, 06:17:39 PM »
Looking to get a SHTF radio.

Still doing my research, but it seems like the Yaesu FT-897D would be the perfect choice. I also like that with a few jumper changes you can extend the transmit range.

Anyone have any opinions or feel that there is a better choice?

Offline Truik

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Re: Yaesu FT-897D Opinions?
« Reply #1 on: January 23, 2010, 06:48:16 PM »
I looked it up on E-hams and found 28 pages or reviews from people that LOVE this radio.

I found two reviews that gave it four stars instead of five out of five like the majority of them and one was a guy that said there were a lot of features and a bit of a learning curve for e new ham (that can easily be overcome by spending some quality time with the instruction manual and the radio) and another one that said a gauge was too small to see but he got an external add-on so now its perfect.

After reading the reviews...I want one for myself!

http://www.eham.net/reviews/detail/2432


Offline JS_280

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Re: Yaesu FT-897D Opinions?
« Reply #2 on: January 23, 2010, 11:23:11 PM »
I love mine.  Most negative comments you will find regarding the 897 is due to the menu system.  However, if you spend 5 minutes reading through the menu map in the manual, you should have no problems with it.  The fact that the radio is HF/VHF/UHF really makes it nice.  It saves you from having to carry multiple radios if you're camping/hiking. 

While not a QRP rig by any means, I like that the Standby and RX amperage draw is less than most HF rigs you will find.  As far as the small screen, it seems quite sufficient to me.  You can control the size of the frequency read-out on the display to be large or X-large.  If you're using software such as Ham Radio Deluxe to control the rig as a base station, the screen is irrelevant anyway.

My one and only complaint about the rig concerns the user-definable "Quick Menu".  You are only given a single bank of three menu options that are user-definable and if you use a menu option that is not a "Quick Menu" setting, the display only shows the menu number, not the abbreviated name.  For example, menu item #75 is your RF Power setting.  When you set this as one of the user-definable quick menu buttons, you only see "75:" displayed, not an abbreviated name.  As long as you remember what menu options you have set on your three buttons, it's not a problem.

I recently purchased some Anderson PowerPole connectors and an 8 way splitter and LOVE how convenient the power supply setup is now.  I would highly recommend putting the PowerPole connectors on your power supply, batteries and radio as soon as you get it.




AC

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Re: Yaesu FT-897D Opinions?
« Reply #3 on: January 24, 2010, 01:50:03 AM »
A lot of people like it, thus a lot of hints, kinks, and mods out there. The menu system is bad, except for all the OTHER systems for radios out there, your first mission is to learn to turn your display a sick pink color, once you learn to do that, you've got it licked.

The "companion" autotuner, Meh not so great, you can do better, I think Elecraft makes a nice one for it, if you like to build kits. Winding toroids! Yay!

The radio LOOKs more "bada$$" than it really is, but off the top of my head I can't think of anything better that normal people can get.

Offline Truik

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Re: Yaesu FT-897D Opinions?
« Reply #4 on: January 24, 2010, 01:55:04 AM »
...off the top of my head I can't think of anything better that normal people can get.

 :wtf:  ;D

I'm assuming you're referring to folks not actively enrolled in the military or some ingenious facet of the federal government.

 ::)


Fred_47460

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Re: Yaesu FT-897D Opinions?
« Reply #5 on: January 24, 2010, 05:39:36 AM »
There is probably not a better SHTF radio than the FT-897D. Receives about any kind of signal you could want and is pretty good on power consumption. Get a FT-897D, a deep cycle battery, and a small solar panel and you are good to go!! If you also want to transmit about anywhere, get a antenna tuner (Not the auto tuner that Yaesu sells for the 897....it sucks)....get a manual tuner or the LDG auto tuner they sell for the 897D. I've got the FT-857D, which is the mobile version of the FT-897D.....the radios are pretty much exactly alike except for the size of the container. If you are less concerned with putting out a big signal but are more concerned with power consumption, then you might check out the FT-817......receives everything the 857 and 897 will.....but it USES much less power to run....but of course it transmits at a much reduced power and will not give you that BIG signal you might want.

adp113

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Re: Yaesu FT-897D Opinions?
« Reply #6 on: January 24, 2010, 09:01:40 AM »
I have an 897 that replaced a 706 that was taken out in a lightning strike.  The 897 is a great radio at doing nothing really well.  What is does do, a small portable wide rx/tx all in one radio.  For $800/900 it really is a good deal.

Offline Jack Crabb

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Re: Yaesu FT-897D Opinions?
« Reply #7 on: January 24, 2010, 09:56:46 AM »
For those who have the 897D running, could you post your list of equipment? What have you tried and gotten rid of?

I bought an 897D about a year ago. I then bought the AC/DC power supply. I bought the battery packs and chargers. Then, I came up against the antenna wall.

There is manual tune antennas. Auto tune. HF and VHF/UHF. 100+ foot wires and 6 foot whips. Then, there is the whole antenna tuner that interfaces with the radio. Some people make it sound like unless you have everything perfectly tuned then you will have only unusable static or blow out the electronics. Others sound like you can jam a straightened coat hanger in the tuner and work Antarctica.

I guess, at some point, you have to concede the fact that one cannot conveniently have one antenna to work the entire electromagnetic spectrum. Is 10 to 40 meters sufficient? 80m or 160m necessary?

What about digital interfaces for PSK31, Olivia etc.?

Are the SSB or CW chips necessary or just nice to have?

I am looking for a setup that would best fit into the expeditionary situation. I am not going to set up a permanent home base and don't foresee operating HF in a vehicle while moving (I already have a VHF/UHF radio in the truck). Something that I can set up on the deck from time to time during the summer or join in local radio club field days.

idahobob

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Re: Yaesu FT-897D Opinions?
« Reply #8 on: January 24, 2010, 10:05:02 AM »
The FT-897D is #2 on my current purchase priority list.

Already filled the original #1 slot....2 VX-7R's.

Bob
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Offline pac1911

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Re: Yaesu FT-897D Opinions?
« Reply #9 on: January 24, 2010, 10:06:44 AM »
I'm listening....

Have just started getting into HAM and am wondering where to head with HF. I have been happy with the two Yaesu radios thatI have now vx-7r and ft7900r soI dont see a reason to switch.
pc

Offline idelphic

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Re: Yaesu FT-897D Opinions?
« Reply #10 on: January 24, 2010, 02:08:54 PM »
If you like the 897 - look at at the 857.  The only real difference is that the 897 has space for an internal battery, while the 857 does not.  Power wise, and band wise, they are equal.

Offline Diablo

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Re: Yaesu FT-897D Opinions?
« Reply #11 on: January 24, 2010, 05:37:37 PM »
For those who have the 897D running, could you post your list of equipment? What have you tried and gotten rid of?

I bought an 897D about a year ago. I then bought the AC/DC power supply. I bought the battery packs and chargers. Then, I came up against the antenna wall.

There is manual tune antennas. Auto tune. HF and VHF/UHF. 100+ foot wires and 6 foot whips. Then, there is the whole antenna tuner that interfaces with the radio. Some people make it sound like unless you have everything perfectly tuned then you will have only unusable static or blow out the electronics. Others sound like you can jam a straightened coat hanger in the tuner and work Antarctica.

I guess, at some point, you have to concede the fact that one cannot conveniently have one antenna to work the entire electromagnetic spectrum. Is 10 to 40 meters sufficient? 80m or 160m necessary?

What about digital interfaces for PSK31, Olivia etc.?

Are the SSB or CW chips necessary or just nice to have?

I am looking for a setup that would best fit into the expeditionary situation. I am not going to set up a permanent home base and don't foresee operating HF in a vehicle while moving (I already have a VHF/UHF radio in the truck). Something that I can set up on the deck from time to time during the summer or join in local radio club field days.

I would like to know too!

Would be nice to know what specifically has worked for others.

I'm just starting out and all this is a bit overwhelming.


AC

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Re: Yaesu FT-897D Opinions?
« Reply #12 on: January 24, 2010, 05:53:10 PM »
:wtf:  ;D

I'm assuming you're referring to folks not actively enrolled in the military or some ingenious facet of the federal government.

 ::)



Exactly.

Offline pac1911

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Re: Yaesu FT-897D Opinions?
« Reply #13 on: January 24, 2010, 07:30:17 PM »
If you like the 897 - look at at the 857.  The only real difference is that the 897 has space for an internal battery, while the 857 does not.  Power wise, and band wise, they are equal.

So A deep cycle + Charger and a 857 and you are ready as a base station and mobile if you want to move the unit in and out?

Offline WestTx753

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Re: Yaesu FT-897D Opinions?
« Reply #14 on: January 24, 2010, 07:44:45 PM »
I have used my FT-857 for both mobile and base. FT-897 same basic radio. The only issue is antenna tuner. I used mine with a long loop of #12 thhn and a MFJ tuner works great. PSK with a simple interface such as a Donner, and fldigi.

Offline Ragnar

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Re: Yaesu FT-897D Opinions?
« Reply #15 on: January 24, 2010, 09:45:07 PM »
I have the 857D and love it, granted It is the only HF rig I have ever had. First few times at the radio you will need the instruction manual (goes for the 897 as well since they operate exactly the same).   How far you get out is all dependent on the antenna. As they sam A good antenna can make a bad rig awesome and a bad antenna can make a good rig crappy.

Either is a good choice. I encourage you all to attend Field day in june and get involved with a local Ham club, I really go to try out several radios  before buying.. But field day s a long way off.

Offline Carl

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Re: Yaesu FT-897D Opinions?
« Reply #16 on: August 23, 2014, 07:47:45 AM »
While I much prefer the looks of the FT 450D ,the ft 897 is an excellent radio that with a battery and automatic antenna tuner makes a great HAM radio setup...all you need to add is an antenna...While in motion the auto tuner will tune a 9 foot Stainless steel CB whip or a 20/40 meter Hamstick antenna to operate on 6 to 40 meters or so. And when stationary an end fed half wave wire will work 80 thru 6 meters wile only needing 70 feet of wire tossed in a tree etc by just attaching a water bottle on the end an tossing it in a tree...an antenna is always drawn with straight lines...but staigt line are just easy to draw...the antenna does not have to be strait in order to work.

  A 35 foot wire can be supported by a 20 foot squid pole(collapses to 30 inches) and set at an angle so wire goes up the pole and the hangs to the 'near ground' at about 5 to 10 feet from the pole (looks like you are fishing) and this with a 17 foot 6 inch counter poise will cover 40 through 6 meters with an auto tuner and by folding(halving) the counter poise for 10 and 6 meters.

  Scrap wire is not hard to find and make use of and the length needed has been cut so many times that memory will hold on to it.


65 to 70 feet is a half wave for 40 meters , covers 80 - 6 meters
32 to 35 feet is a half wave for 20 meters, covers 40 - 6 meters
17' 6" is a half wave for 10 meters , covers 20 - 6 meters

Note these are NOT EXACT as the auto tuner is the HAM's greatest wire adjuster , you can and will get best performance with your wire being at the half wave length of each wire length above but with a good auto tuner can adjust the antenna for bands above and below the 'cut' length for greater flexibility.

As for SWR...the real need for low SWR is to protect the solid state components in your transmitter and is not really a good sign of antenna efficiency or effectiveness. The Half Wave End Fed has a 72 ohm impedance so when PERFECT it would indicate 1.5 to 1 SWR...while a DIPOLE cut to a quarter wave on each leg  is typically 35 ohms for a 1.5 to 1 impedance.

  So when someone asks you opinion of their 1 to 1 SWR...tell them that either their antenna is not cut right or their SWR meter is not reading correctly.SWR is NOT a measure of antenna effectiveness....it can be an indicator of trouble...BUT STOP DAMAGING YOUR ANTENNAS in order to get a reading on a meter ...CUT TO LENGTH and let the TUNER make your radio happy.

That "TUNE" button is really the EASY button for modern day HAM operators..and as AUTO tuners are at a very close price point to MANUAL tuners...why choose manual?

Just my TWO CENTs at adding to an old thread that is still current for many radio operators.

Offline Canadian Prepper

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Re: Yaesu FT-897D Opinions?
« Reply #17 on: August 24, 2014, 07:59:22 PM »
It's difficult to make a comparison, as it's the only HF transceiver that I've owned, but I got one with an LDG auto tuner, Alinco DM330MV power supply and have mostly played around with an MFJ 2886 "Big Stick" telescoping portable antenna. The latter antenna is usually just good enough to connect to the daily Ontario Communications Net, the weekly Ontario ARES HF net (though I was too weak to be heard today) and I made a few AMRRON and TAPRNet contacts with it, but have had less success lately. I have also tried 80m MFJ hamsticks on the same mount as the Big Stick with lots of additional radials, but I've only been able to listen with it. I am in a downtown, built up area but with enough space to set up outside but surrounded by many potential sources of noise.

Once I have the time, I'll have to try a kit I picked up used for $65 that gives me a 36ft pole with guy ropes to rig up a dipole. I've got an Alpha Delta DX-EE that receives much better than the MFJ vertical, but I've had less success TXing with it from the backyard, where I've slowly been raising it a bit higher each time I play with it, as I haven't enough room to easily set up the 36ft pole. A nice thing about the DX-EE is that at only 40ft I have no trouble fitting it into the back yard (working on getting it higher) though I'm not sure if the north-south orientation in the backyard is optimal for most of the nets I want to connect with. But I think the 897 deserves a decent dipole to test its abilities with and it should be easy enough to take along to wherever one might want to transmit away from home.

I've got a good deep cycle antenna and have to rig up the Powergate PG40S adapter to keep it charged up and ready to provide backup power. I've also listened to digital via a Rigblaster Nomic Sound Card interface but haven't transmitted with it yet. I think that I might consider getting the built in power supply that goes where the proprietary batteries would go to simplify packing it for portable use and add a pair of 7amp hour batteries for backpack use. I'll either use that with the dipole for HF or an N9TAX slim jim for 2m/70cm. If I figure out all of that gear by Christmas, especially how best to rig up the antennas, I think I'll be in good shape. I've also got the Kenwood TM-D710G that I need to figure out how to use with Echolink and IRLP, at which will also keep me occupied for a couple of months. I'm beginning to think of how to best pack these things up into a go kit, though on the short term I'll probably set up the Kenwood first, as the local ARES group primarily uses VHF/UHF and it would be perfect for that.

I wish I could compare the rig with others but the 897 offers enough options to keep a new ham like myself busy. Perhaps I'll augment it later with an ICOM 7200, but I'll need at least a couple more months just to figure out all the possibilities with the 897 so I'm in no rush to fork over the money for a second HF rig. I might also have to sit down with a really experienced ham I know who has the same rig to run by the various filters and how to take advantage of them, as I don't know whether or how much of a difference those features might make on the effectiveness of the rig.


Offline Carl

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Re: Yaesu FT-897D Opinions?
« Reply #18 on: August 25, 2014, 05:09:28 AM »
The problem with deep cycle ,gell cell,and other batteries is that you need to size the battery to the load so that the internal chemistry can properly supply the power needed for the hi transient nature of Single Side Band operation. While it may appear to work just fine,your audio is not accurately reproduced and of adequate power without a battery that has enough current capability.

A 100 watt radio can and will draw currents as high as 20 to 25 AMPs and a battery is stressed at just 10 percent of it's capacity...sure a battery will work outside of it's design specs...but they often lag and cannot properly reproduce accurately the spikes of human voice at expected levels...you will be weak and MUFFLED.

A 50 AMP HOUR battery (auto battery size) is about the MINIMUM size to adequately power a 100 watt HF radio with human voice at anywhere near accurate reproduction and power. Notice how when mobile ,your power drops noticeably as soon as the auto is not running and charging the battery? Why is that except for the batteries lack of ability to provide adequate power to properly operate the radio?

Yes ,I know the voltage is down 10% or so,but even audio quality suffers with just the battery providing the power.I have seen this on a scope monitoring the radio. So if you want to have YOUR best possible signal...provide your radio with adequate power , a good earth ground, and a proper antenna...( hopefully a full size antenna ,rather than an abbreviated coil or trap equipped wonder...you wonder how it works) A quarter wave on 40 meters is about 35 FEET...if your antenna is shorter than that, then it is a compromise...not near the capability of a properly sized antenna.

I appear to preach at times but just because they advertise outrageous specs for the shortened commercial antennas does NOT make it TRUE. A plumber will not use a 5 foot pipe to pump sewage the TEN feet out of your house...Why operate your radio, that you depend on, UNDER A HANDICAP?

Last note,If you worry about the direction of your dipole,just tie it so the ends are a few feet below the middle (feed point) and your inverted "V" or even G5RV will display OMNI-DIRECTIONAL capability. It really is that easy. :)

Offline Canadian Prepper

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Re: Yaesu FT-897D Opinions?
« Reply #19 on: August 25, 2014, 08:21:32 AM »
A 50 AMP HOUR battery (auto battery size) is about the MINIMUM size to adequately power a 100 watt HF radio with human voice at anywhere near accurate reproduction and power. Notice how when mobile ,your power drops noticeably as soon as the auto is not running and charging the battery? Why is that except for the batteries lack of ability to provide adequate power to properly operate the radio?

Yes ,I know the voltage is down 10% or so,but even audio quality suffers with just the battery providing the power.I have seen this on a scope monitoring the radio. So if you want to have YOUR best possible signal...provide your radio with adequate power , a good earth ground, and a proper antenna...( hopefully a full size antenna ,rather than an abbreviated coil or trap equipped wonder...you wonder how it works) A quarter wave on 40 meters is about 35 FEET...if your antenna is shorter than that, then it is a compromise...not near the capability of a properly sized antenna.

I appear to preach at times but just because they advertise outrageous specs for the shortened commercial antennas does NOT make it TRUE.
Last note, If you worry about the direction of your dipole,just tie it so the ends are a few feet below the middle (feed point) and your inverted "V" or even G5RV will display OMNI-DIRECTIONAL capability. It really is that easy. :)

Thanks for those pointers. That would explain why the fellows at the store recommended a cycle 31 100AH battery which is what I've got for the home QTH. I might still get some 7AH batteries for the Kenwood, which might be put into an ammo can with the PG40S connected, as it's designed to work at 5 and 10W (low and medium power) and with a Slim Jim should work fine for local work, though given the price of the proprietary batteries for the Yaesu, I might just have to settle for the heavier battery and inverter generator for Field Day use.

The Alpha Delta DX EE is forty feet with coils at the end to make up for the shorter length, so it's probably the optimum size for my home QTH. The set up is currently at about 16-18ft high in the center, and about 3-4 feet lower at the ends, but I'll probably try a few other set ups to see what works best and hopefully get the center point higher at some point. I couldn't be heard at all on the Sunday TAPRNet despite two or three check ins in the past. I got into the 40m Communications Ontario Net today, but I had a weaker signal than with the 17ft Big Stick and we have a net control operator who wasn't on duty but used to listening for my signal who advised that I was calling in. The setup might work okay on 20m but will take some calls into 14.300 to confirm that.

At this point I need to sit down with a local to show me how all of the filters work to see what I could make of it. Another afternoon with it should suffice to figure out how to program the local repeaters into it (there's lots of You Tube videos that seem to make sense), and perhaps confirm whether or not it has a problem transmitting on UHF. I can hear okay, but the radio seems unable to set the power higher than 20W and nobody could hear when I transmit on 70cm, despite hitting the repeater and beyond fine with the same antenna on 5w with my Kenwood. I still have about 15months warranty on it at the local dealer who's authorized to service it for Yaesu in Canada, but would like to confirm any problems first before taking it in. Otherwise the radio worked fine to hit the local repeater on  2m and did fine the few times I called into the NCS of our simplex net, who's a healthy distance away from me. While VHF/UHF is a secondary use of this radio for me, I can still anticipate using it a lot more in that capacity.

Offline Carl

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Re: Yaesu FT-897D Opinions?
« Reply #20 on: August 25, 2014, 08:54:26 AM »
Canadian Prepper ...the 897 is a great radio,I would have one BUT I prefer the looks and controls of the FT 450D...I use an 897 at the communications center each week and it does well.

How far are you from the 40 meter net that you have difficulty with? HF has a real problem with "in between" distances ...say closer than 500 miles.

Also as I have said in many of my other posts...ANTENNAS are drawn straight because straight lines are easy to draw. NOTHING says you can't fold the ends of an antenna for a narrow yard  you just need a couple extra insulators for the job...My lot is 55 feet wide and my antenna is 140 feet from end to end ...30 feet to each side direction TURN 90 deg. and 40 feet toward the back of the yard on each leg. The radio doesn't even try to 'twist' when I use it. Sure the transmission pattern is not perfect...but ,due to propagation, transmission patterns rarely are perfect  I just let 'er rip and people hear me...I just don't tell them that the antenna is twisted.

Oh yes,their really is nothing wrong with your choice of antenna , just understand that with a shorter than wavelength antenna , you rely MORE on propagation than radio and antenna effectiveness. Most of life is a compromise ,or we would all be good looking Billionaires. 

Offline Canadian Prepper

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Re: Yaesu FT-897D Opinions?
« Reply #21 on: August 25, 2014, 11:37:17 AM »
Canadian Prepper ...the 897 is a great radio,I would have one BUT I prefer the looks and controls of the FT 450D...I use an 897 at the communications center each week and it does well.

How far are you from the 40 meter net that you have difficulty with? HF has a real problem with "in between" distances ...say closer than 500 miles.

Also as I have said in many of my other posts...ANTENNAS are drawn straight because straight lines are easy to draw. NOTHING says you can't fold the ends of an antenna for a narrow yard  you just need a couple extra insulators for the job...My lot is 55 feet wide and my antenna is 140 feet from end to end ...30 feet to each side direction TURN 90 deg. and 40 feet toward the back of the yard on each leg. The radio doesn't even try to 'twist' when I use it. Sure the transmission pattern is not perfect...but ,due to propagation, transmission patterns rarely are perfect  I just let 'er rip and people hear me...I just don't tell them that the antenna is twisted.

Oh yes,their really is nothing wrong with your choice of antenna , just understand that with a shorter than wavelength antenna , you rely MORE on propagation than radio and antenna effectiveness. Most of life is a compromise ,or we would all be good looking Billionaires.

Since it's on topic with the thread, I ought to mention that I too seriously considered the FT-450D when I got my 897D, as it also had good reviews, and was attractively priced, especially considering the included auto tuner. My research and subsequent experience validated my preference for the 897 with LDG auto tuner, as it provides more leeway for less than resonant antennas, and I wanted to have the VHF/UHF capability in the same radio.

I've played with a few 40m nets, the Ontario ones consisting mostly of people within a few hundred miles from me that take place mid morning or early afternoon when the band might be harder to follow but works better for local traffic. The odd thing is that while it's noticeably harder to listen with the MFJ vertical, I seem to get better signal reports with it from those who hear me. The dipole makes it much easier to listen (both to stations within that net area and well beyond at night), but I still got a weaker signal report with it today on the 40m provincial net. Given that it's got stations from at least the North, East and West participating I would expect enough to be able to hear me well even if the dipole works better in some directions. Also, while I can hear the 40m TAPRNet more clearly with it in the evenings, they don't seem to be able to hear me, even when I tried multiple early check ins before the net started last night. Given the location of the NCS relative to me, that's easier to explain on account of the antenna's orientation, but there's more work to be done. 20m still works best, as I've successfully checked into both the Intercom and Maritime Mobile nets today, which is consistent with the dipole's past performance, and it was difficult, if not impossible to connect with the MFJ vertical.

Back to the topic of the FT-897D, I think that my comments point towards the recurring theme that most radios will work fine with a good antenna setup, but that the 897 still offers a good number of complimentary features at its price point. It sounds as though it's a good pick, but that beyond some programming that it's largely a matter of joining it to the right accessories (batteries, tuner, antennas, etc.) and practicing with it. It's not rocket science but definitely something best dealt with before an emergency.

 

Offline Carl

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Re: Yaesu FT-897D Opinions?
« Reply #22 on: August 25, 2014, 11:57:50 AM »
Most any properly functioning radio will do,all you get with chrome plated buttons are options to better match YOU to the radio.
The VERTICAL antenna has a take-off angle that is best suited to DX or distance talking while your horizontal antenna,partly due to it's slightly below OPTIMUM HEIGHT (30 feet for a 40 meter is concidered optimun/minimum height) and so it is slightly better suited to stations that are a tad close for the current propagation (the angle that your signal will bounce back to earth)

At less than 500 miles ,you may find LOWERING your horizontal antenna will help,see threads in HAM RADIO about NVIS for more but HEIGHT ABOVE GROUND is not always the best choice for lesser distances on HF. One of my antennas is actually BELOW GROUND and works good,though slightly less so than one that is 8 feet above ground...that's right only EIGHT FEET and Alan and I talk each week consistently while he is about 220 miles from me and way too close for 'normal' 40 meter propagation.

Please don't think me critical of any antenna that you use,I am just a highly opinionated grumpy old man with a $3 piece of wire that is heard all over the country and think your antenna likely just needs a bit of adjustment of it's height to be perfect for you needs.

But I must add,that propagation does not always respect 'perfect'...

Offline Canadian Prepper

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Re: Yaesu FT-897D Opinions?
« Reply #23 on: August 25, 2014, 01:16:45 PM »
I have been following the NVIS thread with interest, but for now it's more a question of trying to get maximum versatility out of what I've got. I was just playing with the setup a couple minutes ago and discovered that I could easily raise the center about another four feet with the tension I've got and perhaps make it a tad more like an inverted V with the effects that would give on propagation. I just need to figure out how to modify the mount, add extra length to the pole, etc.

I'll probably play around with lowering the ends a couple feet as the antenna stands now, lowering and raising the center, and perhaps stringing it across the property from an upstairs  balcony where it would be more out of the way. I want the option of local and long distance comms on 40m if I can get it (the AMRRON and TAPRN nets come to mind), though I'd prefer a good NVIS set up over a mediocre compromise. It seems to already work fairly well for 20m and I hope to play around more with it to see what she could do.

Offline Carl

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Re: Yaesu FT-897D Opinions?
« Reply #24 on: August 25, 2014, 01:40:51 PM »
Canadian Prepper...I will gladly offer what advise I can and hope it is accepted as genuine attempt to aide and not as being critical. Antennas have long been a hobby of mine,even when it was just for CB. I have played...er experimented with many designs ,both old and new, including the worm warmer,underground antenna.