Author Topic: Crossbow Basics.  (Read 38491 times)

Offline Steve Cover

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Crossbow Basics.
« on: January 28, 2010, 06:12:43 PM »
Lots of good information on crossbows on this site.

However, I haven't seen a lot on the actual mechanics.

For example, draw weight does not necessarily mean a faster bolt speed.

There is also the draw length to consider.  The longer the string stays in contact with the bolt, the longer the power transmitted by the string has to accelerate it.

When we get into inexpensive 100 lb - 150 lb draw weight crossbows often seen in advertisements, take a look at the draw length.

Back in the late 1950 to 1960s Wamo offered an 80 lb draw aluminum prod crossbow.  It shot fairly well because it had an 18" draw.

The small inexpensive crossbows I see advertised today might have a 150lb draw weight but only a 12" draw.  These don't shoot any better than the old 80LB Wamo.

Now to contrast these cheap bows to the "Gee-Wiz" top end crossbows available today, they all have a reasonable draw length and are very powerful indeed.



Learning to keep the fingers out of the line of the bow while loading a bolt.



25 year old Barnett Panzer 150 LB 13" draw crossbow.  Modified by adding a recoil pad the lengthen stock, and a foot stirrup to assist in cocking.

I make my own strings.  Center serving is 0.020" Stainless Aircraft Safety wire.

Hope this has made some sense and clarification

SAFETY CONSIDERATIONS:
Keep the string well waxed and inspect often... Any frayed areas mean new string now.
Always wear eye protection.... A broken string propelled by a 150lb prod can take out an eye instantly.

Steve
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Offline Jimbo

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Re: Crossbow Basics.
« Reply #1 on: January 29, 2010, 08:37:00 AM »
"SAFETY CONSIDERATIONS:
Keep the string well waxed and inspect often... Any frayed areas mean new string now.
Always wear eye protection.... A broken string propelled by a 150lb prod can take out an eye instantly."

 Damn Skippy, your sage advice deserves an ECHO BUMP!! 8)
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Offline chad234

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Re: Crossbow Basics.
« Reply #2 on: January 30, 2010, 09:01:34 AM »
Steve- what would you recommend as a high quality starter crossbow? Any techinques you can suggest for cocking or shooting? 

Offline Steve Cover

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Re: Crossbow Basics.
« Reply #3 on: January 31, 2010, 06:13:10 PM »
Steve- what would you recommend as a high quality starter crossbow? Any techinques you can suggest for cocking or shooting? 
How do you define "Starter"?

What do you really want a crossbow for?  The more important to your survival, the higher quality the (& price) of the bow.

I haven't shopped for a crossbow for many years.

My little Barnett is my only one.  For what I use it for, it is all I need. 

I target shoot with it, but since I make my own arrows, many of the broken arrows, become "Throwaway" bolts.

In a true apocalyptic survival scenario, I can attach broadheads to these bolts, and have a quiet shortrange weapon.

If you want to try a crossbow before committing a large sum of money, check out your local archery shop and see if there is an archery club in your area.

There is usually a crossbow owner or two in every archery club.  I'm sure that they would let you shoot one.

They would also have opinions of current offerings, much more up to date than mine.

The upscale bows available now are truly awesome, (As is their price).  But, if it's legal for you to hunt with one they are the way to go.

There many low end Barrett copies available mail order.  This will get you into crossbows cheap, and if bowfishing is a practical option, might be a good first bow. 

You can convert your cheap clone  into a fishing only setup if you upgrade to a more expensive bow.

Considerations:

My simple glass pod bow can be easily broken down and packed in a flat case I designed for it.

If you get a Block & Tackle system, takedown is impractical.

NEVER USE WOOD for crossbow bolts on the more powerful crossbows.  These are not ARROWS. 

While I make very short bolts out of broken arrows for my 150 pound Panzer, I do so at my own risk....  Always go Aluminum or Carbon for bolts.



MIDEIVIL ARROW & CROSSBOW BOLTS

If you don't make your own strings, get several replacements. 

Check the string often and keep it well waxed. (Reduces the friction within the string).

Any sign of wear, and its gone.

My Little Barret Panzer didn't have a foot stirrup when I git it.... Believe me, your stomach will thank you. 

What ever crossbow you get, put a stirrup on it.

As far as cocking assists go there are several.

The Medieval "Goat's Foot" lever is adaptable to most crossbows, and some of the shoot through trees monsters have a little windless crank to draw the bow.

My little Panzer is only 150 pounds, so, I just put my foot in the stirrup and grunt (Literally) the string back to cock it.

However, I recently ran across this picture showing a improvised cocking aid that I'm planning to make.



I have a great time with my little Barnett Panzer, and have eliminated a couple of pests on my 300 Meter Silhouette Pistol Range in Eastern Washington.

Get as many opinions as you can, and then spend wisely.

I'm sure you will have as much enjoyment as I have had.

Take Care,

Steve


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Offline chad234

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Re: Crossbow Basics.
« Reply #4 on: January 31, 2010, 07:43:16 PM »
A friend of mine growing up loved crossbows. They have opened up the laws on them in MI, but I have still not gotten into them.

Seems like re-cocking in a treestand might be a dangerous proposition.

Offline Steve Cover

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Re: Crossbow Basics.
« Reply #5 on: February 01, 2010, 01:54:26 AM »
Here is an example of an inexpensive crossbow.

This is not an endorsement of this bow.....  Just an example of what is out there.




SAMPLE ADDVERTISEMENT.... NOT A CURRENT ADD .....


This could be a good choice for a cache....

Steve


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Offline Docwatmo

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Re: Crossbow Basics.
« Reply #6 on: February 02, 2010, 06:01:55 AM »
Steve C

A couple of questions for you on bows and bowstrings.

Do you make your own for a specific reason (more intimate knowledge of the bow or process? Cheaper?  More field expedient?)
What materials do you use to make your own bowstrings? 
How much more economical is it to have a roll of materials than to just have a dozen store bought strings in a box?

I'm planning on building my first longbow and although I can be pretty primitive building the bow, i'm not sure about strings.  I don't know enough about the strings yet.

I have no problem purchasing a bunch of spares and keeping them around, but i'd like to learn to be a bit more self reliant with the bows. (I shoot a compound for fun and sport but know nothing about the mechanics.  I prefer a simple Long or recurve).  If I have to walk away from my gear and need to build a bow.  I'd like to know how to make a string thats going to stand up to more than a couple shots and not take an eye out.

Thanks for any guidance.

Doc


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Offline Steve Cover

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Re: Crossbow Basics.
« Reply #7 on: February 02, 2010, 11:11:57 AM »
Hi Doc,

Archery has been one of my hobbies for over 50 years.

As such, I've learned how to make my own equipment for my own entertainment.

Financial concederations were not a factor.

I make both Endless & Flemish Twist bow strings.

I still use Brownell B50 Dacron for my strings.  There are several newer materials available, but I like the B50.

I serve with several materials, Nylon, Monofilliment (Fish Line), Silk, Dacron, and on occasion (Crossbows) 0.020" Stainless Steel Aircraft Safety Wire.

If cost is a factor, buying a spare string or two is naturally less expensive.

However, making your own strings allows the construction of custom length bows.  (Either from material size restrictions or by necessity for a specific purpose bow)

If you can make your own bow, don't buy a commercial string jig. 

I made my own and would be happy to send you the plans and walk you through the process.

There are several sources of bowstring making instruction available.

Here is an example:   http://www.mac.asn.au/string_making.htm   

Steve
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Offline Docwatmo

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Re: Crossbow Basics.
« Reply #8 on: February 02, 2010, 12:00:10 PM »
Outstanding Steve.  That is exactly what I was looking for.

I love archery and really want to get "Back to Basics" and learn everything I can. 

Cost is not a consideration for me either,  (I was just curious if there was a big difference).  I would prefer to learn the skill well myself rather than depend on a third party).  I'm a tinkerer and love to dig into a project like this.  Not to mention I want to teach my boys to be self sufficient and this project is the start of a hobby that they and I are really enjoying together.

I'm a tall guy and was wondering if lengthening the longbow a bit would have any benefits or detriments or if I should stick to specific lengths.

I would really appreciate any guidance and knowledge you could throw my way.

Sorry to hijack this crossbow thread.  I'll start a new thread for Home Made Longbow.

Thanks again

Doc
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Offline OldSoul

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Re: Crossbow Basics.
« Reply #9 on: February 23, 2012, 02:58:54 PM »
I am sorry but this is riddled with lies.

Firstly the crossbow pictured and descibed by Steve is not a 25 year old barnett panzer. I know this because I own and shoot two of them.

There are pictures here of a Panzer or a Chinese copy.

http://fotoblog.in/clanek/419

I also own the Chinese copy. You can tell the two apart because there is a barnett logo on the bottom of the grip on the real one.

There is little in function between the original and the Chinese copy, the aluminium is slightly lighter and the dimensiosn of parts are marginally smaller.

Now there is nothing special about the panzer. It is a fairly bog standard 150lb crossbow. It will generate somewhere between 215FPS and 250FPS depending on the condition and the bolt tpe and grain weight.


The trouble is the rest of the comments relating to crossbows here are mostly bull with some cut and paste google facts thrown in.

For example

"I have a great time with my little Barnett Panzer, and have eliminated a couple of pests on my 300 Meter Silhouette Pistol Range in Eastern Washington"

Not unless they were the size of elephants.

At 300 meters the bolt has dropped so far below your sight window that you would hate no hope of hitting a one foot square target consistently. Up to 50 meters, sure, 100 meters, maybe if you *really* know what you are doing, 150 Meters if you have a bow your built and know what you are doing. 300 Meters? Just not possible. Complete nonsense.

"I can attach broadheads to these bolts, and have a quiet shortrange weapon"
OK so crowwbows are supposed to be silent?


Compele nonsense - they are noisy. This is a myth. The noise is sufficient to make will animals jump and run, which is why you should never shoot a crossbow at a living animal unless very close, the bold may end up maiming it if it jumps at the sound.

There are several 'devices' that attempt to silence crossbows but they also slow the FPS.

As with longbows tuning for crossbow broadheads is a challenge and quite difficult, in my experience 2 blade creates the best effect but feel free to experiment.

Finally if you have indeed in a moment of madness decided that you are going to use steel wire as a serving on a kevlar or dacron based string, please stop before you loose an eye. Strings are cheap. I have in one third world country seen a piece of nylon washing line installed on an old barnett wildcat but unless you are re-enacting 'the road' there is very little reason not to just buy 50 bucks of strings and forget about it.

The rope cocking device pictured is just that a rope cocking device. You can get one on ebay for very little. It is not improvised.

However in terms of accuracy it is absolutely critical that the string be drawn exactly without any additional  pressure to the left or right of the limb when it is cocked. This is the advantage of a goats foot. I own a barnett model which is no longer made, an ugly thing in white aluminium. Similarly cant is an accuracy destroyer and a spirit lever is a good extra. Scopes and red dots are fairly pointless. If you can't see 60 Meters then a large moa glowing red dot is certainly not going to assist you.

Archery clubs do not like crossbows. There is a good reason for this, they destroy arachery butts very quickly. A croosbow shooter may do better looking to a gun club in many countries and places.

This is probably the biggest problem a beginner crossbow shooter will have, bolts are expensive and easy to ruin unless you get a good backstop that preserves them.


2119 aluminium arrows may be used for bolts for 150 lb crossbows. There is little or nothing between the cheaper models and their chinese copies and even in the case of the more expsnive bows very little practical performance gain. In essense you will have a maximum accurate range of 60 meters and something that delivers the same FPS as a compound bow. They are noisy and expensive to run in both strings and bolts. Arachery tools are useful and quite cheap, get a scales that measures grains, an arrow cutter and a fleteching jig.

There is great depth to archery and most interesting results come from great care in bolt and arrow design and tuning. If you want to get the best from your bow focus on this.

I could go on....but readers should just take heed that there is much wrong with the stated facts and I am under the impression that this was written by someone charged with enthusiasm for a new toy who got a little carried away and feigned experience and with a pinch of wishfull thinking and fantasy thrown in for good measure..crossbows do not go 300 meters and are not silent and are no better than a compound bow in results. Love the things and wish they could do more but they can't, I've been shooting them for 20 years and have 7 of them hanging on my den walls as I type, along with a bunch of recurves and some compounds.

Quite happy to continue the thread and get into real detail on crossbows, archery, stone bows etc for those who are enthusiasts.

About the only really practcal use for a modern 150 LB is ambush hunting from a stand at short range using a bait. As a weapon it is pretty useless unless you are planning to ambush people, which I would hope you are not. Very little hope whatsoever of hitting a running target at 50 non of hitting reliably at all at any distance in excell of 100M unless you are playing at clout shooting.

DO NOT USE STEEL WIRE ON ARCHERY STRING SERVINGS OR YOU COULD BLIND YOURSELF.




Offline Mr. Bill

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Re: Crossbow Basics.
« Reply #10 on: February 23, 2012, 04:58:36 PM »
OldSoul, welcome to TSP Forum and thanks for the info.

I need to warn you that the way you presented your info is not acceptable on this forum.  You are free to disagree with other members.  You may not insult them by calling them liars.

I encourage you to read more carefully the posts you're replying to.  Nobody claimed to have shot pests at 300 yards, only to have used the crossbow to eliminate pests from a shooting range.  Nobody claimed that crossbows are silent, only that they are quiet relative to other short-range weapons (e.g. handguns).

Please check out our forum's Terms of Service, and don't post any more personal attacks on other members.  Thanks.

Offline fasteddie

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Re: Crossbow Basics.
« Reply #11 on: February 23, 2012, 05:51:56 PM »
I haven't had a lot of practice but I do own some nice crossbows they are so fun to shoot, I have two 11 points one tactical one regular size , both with scopes and I have a horton hunter and a barnett, I have been trying to mount a night vision yukon scope on the barnet I think it would be cool, (coyotes) idk sounds fun.

Offline Tactical Badger

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Re: Crossbow Basics.
« Reply #12 on: March 04, 2012, 04:18:41 PM »
I just picked up a Ten Point GT Flex.  I'm REALLY looking forward to getting this one out for Spring Turkey season.

Offline Steve Cover

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Re: Crossbow Basics.
« Reply #13 on: May 12, 2012, 02:40:11 AM »
I am sorry but this is riddled with lies.

Wow!!!

Just found this.... I've not been back to this thread for some time.

Unlike your poor manners, I'll attempt to answer your accusations politely.

Quote
Firstly the crossbow pictured and descibed by Steve is not a 25 year old barnett panzer. I know this because I own and shoot two of them.

There are pictures here of a Panzer or a Chinese copy.

http://fotoblog.in/clanek/419

I also own the Chinese copy. You can tell the two apart because there is a barnett logo on the bottom of the grip on the real one.

There is little in function between the original and the Chinese copy, the aluminium is slightly lighter and the dimensiosn of parts are marginally smaller.

Now there is nothing special about the panzer. It is a fairly bog standard 150lb crossbow. It will generate somewhere between 215FPS and 250FPS depending on the condition and the bolt tpe and grain weight.

First of all,  my Barnett Panzer predates the one you pictured.... (Barnett upgraded the design several years after I bought mine.. From the factory)
It truly is a Panzer.
I bought a foot stirrup from Barnett and fitted it to my crossbow along with a hokey cheap recoil pad to lengthen the stock.
You need to search further back to earlier designs....  Your bows are about five years younger than mine.

Quote
The trouble is the rest of the comments relating to crossbows here are mostly bull with some cut and paste google facts thrown in.

For example

"I have a great time with my little Barnett Panzer, and have eliminated a couple of pests on my 300 Meter Silhouette Pistol Range in Eastern Washington"

Not unless they were the size of elephants.

At 300 meters the bolt has dropped so far below your sight window that you would hate no hope of hitting a one foot square target consistently. Up to 50 meters, sure, 100 meters, maybe if you *really* know what you are doing, 150 Meters if you have a bow your built and know what you are doing. 300 Meters? Just not possible. Complete nonsense.



This is my 300 Meters Silhouette range showing the Pigs, Turkeys, and Rams.





Chickens (Next to the outhouse) are shot from a different spot.

The ground squirrels that I shot were around 20 yards away.
What on earth would make you think I would shoot at anything at 300 yards with a crossbow?

Quote
"I can attach broadheads to these bolts, and have a quiet shortrange weapon"
OK so crowwbows are supposed to be silent?

Quiet doesn't mean totally silent.... You should know that.
Taking a game animal in a survival situation, I may not want to use my 300 Weatherby.
The use of a crossbow would give the surrounding area a much lower noise signature and not alert anyone else to my location.

Quote
Compele nonsense - they are noisy. This is a myth. The noise is sufficient to make will animals jump and run, which is why you should never shoot a crossbow at a living animal unless very close, the bold may end up maiming it if it jumps at the sound.

Quiet true... I've had deer react to the string noise from my recurve too.
Any deer hunting would naturally be from a blind, and shots taken under 50 yards.

Quote
There are several 'devices' that attempt to silence crossbows but they also slow the FPS.

As with longbows tuning for crossbow broadheads is a challenge and quite difficult, in my experience 2 blade creates the best effect but feel free to experiment.

I've been making strings and arrows since 1962.
This of course means "tuning" arrows for broadheads too....
Just takes attention to detail, the correct spline, the right size fletching and a straight on head installation.

Quote
Finally if you have indeed in a moment of madness decided that you are going to use steel wire as a serving on a kevlar or dacron based string, please stop before you loose an eye. Strings are cheap. I have in one third world country seen a piece of nylon washing line installed on an old barnett wildcat but unless you are re-enacting 'the road' there is very little reason not to just buy 50 bucks of strings and forget about it.

I use steel safety wire servings on the crossbow strings that I make because they abrade far less than the fabric servings from rubbing on the crossbow. 
I inspect my strings on a regular basis and discard often.
Been doing this for a lot of years with no problems....

Quote
The rope cocking device pictured is just that a rope cocking device. You can get one on ebay for very little. It is not improvised.

I have the materials necessary to make my own... Using that picture, I'll improvise one instead of buy one.

Quote
However in terms of accuracy it is absolutely critical that the string be drawn exactly without any additional  pressure to the left or right of the limb when it is cocked. This is the advantage of a goats foot. I own a barnett model which is no longer made, an ugly thing in white aluminium. Similarly cant is an accuracy destroyer and a spirit lever is a good extra.

Absolutely true.... your point?
Do you believe that I don't?

Quote
Scopes and red dots are fairly pointless. If you can't see 60 Meters then a large moa glowing red dot is certainly not going to assist you.

I too have found this to be true.  I bought the cheap 22 rifle sight when I bought the bow.
I just have not had reason to change it.

Quote
Archery clubs do not like crossbows. There is a good reason for this, they destroy arachery butts very quickly. A croosbow shooter may do better looking to a gun club in many countries and places.

Also true.
And of course every fool knows that members of an archery club would never own a crossbow.
However, in the odd chance that a member or two of a club does own a crossbow, they would also probably have a place to shoot it....

Quote
This is probably the biggest problem a beginner crossbow shooter will have, bolts are expensive and easy to ruin unless you get a good backstop that preserves them.

2119 aluminium arrows may be used for bolts for 150 lb crossbows. There is little or nothing between the cheaper models and their chinese copies and even in the case of the more expsnive bows very little practical performance gain. In essense you will have a maximum accurate range of 60 meters and something that delivers the same FPS as a compound bow. They are noisy and expensive to run in both strings and bolts. Arachery tools are useful and quite cheap, get a scales that measures grains, an arrow cutter and a fleteching jig.

There is great depth to archery and most interesting results come from great care in bolt and arrow design and tuning. If you want to get the best from your bow focus on this.

I could go on....but readers should just take heed that there is much wrong with the stated facts and I am under the impression that this was written by someone charged with enthusiasm for a new toy who got a little carried away and feigned experience and with a pinch of wishfull thinking and fantasy thrown in for good measure..crossbows do not go 300 meters and are not silent and are no better than a compound bow in results. Love the things and wish they could do more but they can't, I've been shooting them for 20 years and have 7 of them hanging on my den walls as I type, along with a bunch of recurves and some compounds.

Quite happy to continue the thread and get into real detail on crossbows, archery, stone bows etc for those who are enthusiasts.

About the only really practcal use for a modern 150 LB is ambush hunting from a stand at short range using a bait. As a weapon it is pretty useless unless you are planning to ambush people, which I would hope you are not. Very little hope whatsoever of hitting a running target at 50 non of hitting reliably at all at any distance in excell of 100M unless you are playing at clout shooting.

DO NOT USE STEEL WIRE ON ARCHERY STRING SERVINGS OR YOU COULD BLIND YOURSELF.

Could you provide an example of where and when a steel serving caused a string failure?

It appears that you read quite a bit into my post that wasn't really there.

I'ts been my observation that some people like to tear down someone else to boost their own self worth.
From reading your post, it appears that you may qualify as one.

I'm sure that we would all love to bask in your expertise....

However, learn to read first.

Take Care,
and the horse you rode in on.

Steve
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Offline Steve Cover

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Re: Crossbow Basics.
« Reply #14 on: June 09, 2012, 02:50:01 PM »
Being a bit stung by being called a lier, I finally decided to see if I could find documentation on my Barnett Panzer.



This model was made pre-1986 (I underestimated how long I've had it) in England for Barnett.

It is the original Panzer.

Oldsoul's crossbows are the Panzer II (Post-1986)

If you are still out there Oldsoul, your experience and opinions are still encouraged in this forum.

When you have something constructive to say, we would like to hear it.

Just clearing the air.

Still mildly pissed,

Steve
« Last Edit: June 09, 2012, 03:10:18 PM by Steve Cover »
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Offline welshman

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Re: Crossbow Basics.
« Reply #15 on: June 10, 2012, 01:38:57 PM »
learn to build your own you will learn a lot more than listening to others and become less dependent on others that is what survial is all about . Do it yourself a favor learn to do it you may not have someone to depend on BUT yourself.
Let's tear it down and start all over

Offline boom192

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Re: Crossbow Basics.
« Reply #16 on: July 08, 2012, 06:01:15 PM »
For starters I am new to this forum, hunting, crossbows, survival, gardening, and self sufficiency; I have just awakened from my slumber.  I am not an expert on anything but am excited to learn just about anything.

That being said...I was looking at crossbows for a while and almost pulled the trigger on this one.  It seemed like a really good value for a starter crossbow and if you buy it from Sportsman's Guide it comes with a lifetime warranty.

http://www.sportsmansguide.com/net/cb/arrow-precision-inferno-fury-ii-recurve-crossbow-package-with-rope-cocker.aspx?a=616645

I ended up getting a used Barnett Buck Commander on craigslist and am looking forward to shooting it soon.

A friend of mine has the Barnett Jackal and he loves it.  If I bought one brand new I think I would buy a Jackal and replace the red dot with a 3x or 4x scope.

http://www.sportsmansguide.com/net/cb/barnett174-jackal-crossbow.aspx?a=681070

Lord God, Please help me to want what I need instead of need what I want.

Offline Steve Cover

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Re: Crossbow Basics.
« Reply #17 on: July 28, 2012, 10:48:41 AM »
For starters I am new to this forum, hunting, crossbows, survival, gardening, and self sufficiency; I have just awakened from my slumber.  I am not an expert on anything but am excited to learn just about anything.

That being said...I was looking at crossbows for a while and almost pulled the trigger on this one.  It seemed like a really good value for a starter crossbow and if you buy it from Sportsman's Guide it comes with a lifetime warranty.

http://www.sportsmansguide.com/net/cb/arrow-precision-inferno-fury-ii-recurve-crossbow-package-with-rope-cocker.aspx?a=616645

I ended up getting a used Barnett Buck Commander on craigslist and am looking forward to shooting it soon.

A friend of mine has the Barnett Jackal and he loves it.  If I bought one brand new I think I would buy a Jackal and replace the red dot with a 3x or 4x scope.

http://www.sportsmansguide.com/net/cb/barnett174-jackal-crossbow.aspx?a=681070

Welcome aboard.... Glad you have joined us.

A couple of comments.....

ALWAYS WEAR SAFETY GLASSES.

Check, wax, and replace strings often.

As Oldsoul mentioned, you don't really need a telescopic sight on a crossbow.
My crossbow sports a cheap 1X optical sight and works well for me.
At crossbow ranges (~50 yards or less), magnification might make tracking your target more difficult.
Remember, this is a type of bow, not a rifle.

Best of luck,

Steve
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Offline Agirlwantingtolearn

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Re: Crossbow Basics.
« Reply #18 on: October 23, 2012, 07:46:09 AM »
I am new here and for that matter I have never posted to any forum.  But I would like to get as many inputs as possible.  A little about me, I grew up with my father teaching us about guns, saftey, hunting shooting and pretty much anything that made his girls not having to have someone do it for them. (I thank God for my Daddy!) I am 35 and since being married for 16 years, I have four children and I am tryinig to teach my girls the same thing and teaching my boys how to be the provider! I have not hunted and went shooting only a handful of times. I do not own any guns or bows (YET!). But I do want to learn to use a crossbow and was hoping for some guidance. Yes I am getting it from my Father aswell, Just looking at what other folks have to say as well! 
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Offline archer

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Re: Crossbow Basics.
« Reply #19 on: October 23, 2012, 09:06:14 AM »
That is a nice looking crossbow there Steve.


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Offline welshman

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Re: Crossbow Basics.
« Reply #20 on: October 23, 2012, 02:58:50 PM »
I have learned to make my own crossbows and wooden bolts
Let's tear it down and start all over

Offline DDJ

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Re: Crossbow Basics.
« Reply #21 on: September 10, 2013, 11:06:23 AM »
I was going to sty out of this but as I read on I think I may have a few points.  I must throw out a disclaimer before I go any further.  My bow was purchased as an "Economy" bow back in 1985.  It is a Steel prod recurve bow.   It has spent the last 18 or so years just hanging around and is just going back into service.

1) Look at the sites that come with your bow before you dismiss the use of a scope.  My bow came with a "CHEAP" peep site on the rear that lasted a total of 3 shots.  It was also equipped with a 22Style dovetail scope channel.  I used the Tusco scope off of a 1980s marlin 60 for years until the rail pealed off.  I am not saying that you need a $400 scope but replacing the $0.50 peep site with $40 reddot turned a hunk of junk into a usable tool.
2) Know your limitations.  As mentioned earlier the ballistics are not any better with a crossbow than a compound.  They are by no stretch quite but they do not require hearing protection either. 
3) Look at the fit and finish of your string path.  The string rides on the channel the arrow sits in and if there are edges and snags then the life of your string will be reduced.
4) As a person who does not like heights I am not the most comfortable in my tree stand.  I will not stand up to get down.  I hope it is more respect than fear but it is what it is.  I rediscovered that I can only shoot left of center from my stand with my compound just Saturday.   The ability to shoot seated at odd angles is not there with a compond.  The cross bow will allow me to leave the safety bar in place and take a shot at an extra 30 degrees or so to my right.  Also since you cock the bow as soon as you are in the tree you only have one step to get ready to fire making less movement.
5)  Shoot one before you buy it.  I am sure that a) my preferences have changed and b) by trigger my have gotten worse, but...  The trigger pull on my old bow makes it no fun to shoot.  The pull must be 3 times that of any of the guns in my collection.  I do not have a gauge, but it is massive.  Holding the sites on target as I haul the trigger back is nerve racking.   I have always needed to wear gloves when shooting it for both the cocking and the trigger on my finger.

Crossbows have their place they are not a gun they are not a compound bow they are their own monster with the pluses and minuses all their own.

Offline Steve Cover

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Re: Crossbow Basics.
« Reply #22 on: September 10, 2013, 09:28:51 PM »
I was going to sty out of this but as I read on I think I may have a few points.  I must throw out a disclaimer before I go any further.  My bow was purchased as an "Economy" bow back in 1985.  It is a Steel prod recurve bow.   It has spent the last 18 or so years just hanging around and is just going back into service.
<<< SNIP >>>
Crossbows have their place they are not a gun they are not a compound bow they are their own monster with the pluses and minuses all their own.

Very good points DDJ.
I'm glad you have joined in the discussion.

What brand of crossbow do you have?

The only metal prod crossbow that comes to mind is the aluminum prod Wammo crossbow of the 1960s.

The 1x optical sight I put on my crossbow has proved to be far superior to the factory installed sights that came on the bow.

Welcome aboard,

Steve
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Offline Knecht

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Re: Crossbow Basics.
« Reply #23 on: October 15, 2013, 01:30:09 AM »
Ok, I'll join in the crossbow thread. Bought a used Barnett Rhino this year. It was quite cheap and mainly, it has easily detachable bow, which makes it much easier to transport. First I got some cheap bolts that mostly fell apart on first shot, but then I discovered this Sloveninan guy on ebay, who sells very well made bolts made not from regular carbon fiber, but from carbon fabric. Well priced. Also makes broadheads. Got a couple and they're good! The only problem I had was when one of the fletches fell off (not sure, but I might have hit it by another bolt on the target).
Wanna try some improvised bolts yet. I've made many bow arrows in the past, so bolts shouldn't be too big problem. I'll just need to control myself while forging the heads to make them lightweight enough - I know I tend to make arrowheads too large.

If anyone knew of spareparts for this old Rhino model (such as a retired, non functiuonal one you might have), please let me know. There's a part I'd like to change on mine.
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Offline CaptAmerica

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Re: Crossbow Basics.
« Reply #24 on: October 18, 2016, 11:41:49 AM »
Very Nice, nice picture. I wrap my serving with Plumbers Teflon Tape. Easily reapplied when worn.

Offline iguana15

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Re: Crossbow Basics.
« Reply #25 on: February 09, 2017, 03:07:10 PM »
Great post. I really like the info on the original Barnett PANZER crossbow. I just picked one up and its very fun and effective to shoot. Simple, but will do any job you need it for within its range. I have a few photos which I am going to try and post. PLEASE POST YOUR PANZER 1 PHOTOS, I would love to see a few other examples. The Panzer ad that was posted is the most info I have ever seen on this crossbow. Photos to follow. This is my first post, glad to be part of your online community.

Offline Steve Cover

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Re: Crossbow Basics.
« Reply #26 on: February 12, 2017, 11:15:31 AM »
Great post. I really like the info on the original Barnett PANZER crossbow. I just picked one up and its very fun and effective to shoot. Simple, but will do any job you need it for within its range. I have a few photos which I am going to try and post. PLEASE POST YOUR PANZER 1 PHOTOS, I would love to see a few other examples. The Panzer ad that was posted is the most info I have ever seen on this crossbow. Photos to follow. This is my first post, glad to be part of your online community.
Welcome to the discussion.
I don't get back here as often as I should.
Looking forward to seeing your pictures.

Steve
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Offline Perfesser

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Re: Crossbow Basics.
« Reply #27 on: February 13, 2017, 02:31:16 PM »
I've been shooting a crossbow for about 10 years now. I wanted one that was reliable, it needs to work every time, many miles from my shop or (worse) a bow shop.
Easy to maintain, last thing you want is a shop queen.
Accurate, hardly any point if you can't be sure you hit where you aimed.
It has to be safe, these things can store a huge amount of energy and can be dangerous.
Excalibur makes the best, have the most amazing customer service as well.

Reliability test speaks for itself.
http://www.excaliburcrossbow.com/videos/player/499
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