Author Topic: Post Pictures of Your Bug Out Bags  (Read 515504 times)

Offline UDI-Joshua

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Re: Post Pictures of Your Bug Out Bags
« Reply #150 on: September 04, 2012, 11:00:20 AM »
Is a video ok?

Here is a quick video I did of my small scale BOB. This is the one I keep in my car in the event I get stuck down at work (I work about 53 miles from home) after some form of disaster. I plan to make it home.

The one thing I did forget to show in the video is about 25 feet of paracord, I have that in there as well.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HygH0GQlUL0

Offline loyalty4eva

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Re: Post Pictures of Your Bug Out Bags
« Reply #151 on: September 09, 2012, 08:03:21 PM »
(live in WA)

Yeah you will for sure want rain gear in their. Also a cheapo tarp like 5 bucks would be a great roof if its raining out. I know sitting in the rain when your trying to sleep isnt fun at all after a few hours. As for your cheap pack if you payed less then 40 bucks yeah it was a great deal or free :P otherwise alice packs at like fleetfarm or another army surplus store usally have them cheap and pretty decent condition. Bright orange might as well have a bullseye with it full. Food is only like a couple bucks for a 48-72 hour thing unless you go super fancy.

NumNums24

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Re: Post Pictures of Your Bug Out Bags
« Reply #152 on: September 11, 2012, 02:23:45 AM »
@loyalty4eva

Yea the bright orange bag is definitely something that needs to be fixed immediately, I considered Alice packs but I don't find them very comfortable. I got this pack for just under 50 bucks and I'm thinking about trying to paint it or something (don't know if it would be worth it) because I really like the fit, very comfortable for the pack size. I've also considered tarps but I don't really want one of the cheap ones because they are bulky, but then the ultralight ones are expensive enough that you might as well get a tent in my humble opinion. Took care of food today added some Wise dehydrated food packages.

Thanks for the input

Offline loyalty4eva

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Re: Post Pictures of Your Bug Out Bags
« Reply #153 on: September 14, 2012, 03:34:22 PM »
@numnums

Just a Idea I just came up with I wonder if dyeing your bag is possable like what you would do with your clothes. Spray painting your bag might not work cracks and what not. Another idea is go to a shop that sells fabric maybe and get a color you like then if you know someone that sews or if you do maybe sew the fabric to the bag and cover the orange areas.

These are just thoughts that I would maybe try.

These are BoBs btw. I wouldnt say camo is the best option ethier.





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Re: Post Pictures of Your Bug Out Bags
« Reply #154 on: September 17, 2012, 05:17:23 PM »
@loyalt4eva

Thanks for the ideas I didn't really think about dyeing it, everything would be the same color but if I did black it wouldn't really matter.  I like the size of the bags you posted. I feel like mine is a little big and could use some cutting down.

Offline Rôdeur

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Re: Post Pictures of Your Bug Out Bags
« Reply #155 on: October 29, 2012, 10:10:13 AM »
This is mine:



- Paracord
- Poncho raincoat
- Shemagh
- Cold weather gloves and hat
- Green wire (for traps...)
- Slingshot and mini fishing kit
- Big survival knife with sheath
- SAK with sheath
- WC paper and kleenex
- Mini Esbit stove with fuel and aluminium foil
- Repair stuff (duct tape, super glue, needles and string, sharpening stone...) and fire kit
- Space blanket
- Multi vitamin food complement
- Canteen (1L) and purification water kit
- Cooking pot with snacks, cafe, sugar, Knorr cubes, salt
- Bivybag

Here in the backpack, with direct access to first aid kit, whisttle, mini compass and mini led:





And easy access to the main knife, the poncho, canteen... Or WC paper  ;D

...Of curse, I also carry my EDC as a complement of my BOB in case of bug out. A few items that are not in my BOB (such as a lintern, a multitool...) are part of my EDC.

Offline Texas Sawduster

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Re: Post Pictures of Your Bug Out Bags
« Reply #156 on: October 30, 2012, 10:41:33 AM »
Heres whats in it:

1) Bible
[/quote]

I like your first pick.
Need to add one to mine as well.

Thanks


Offline Texas Sawduster

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Re: Post Pictures of Your Bug Out Bags
« Reply #157 on: October 30, 2012, 10:42:35 AM »
@loyalty4eva

Yea the bright orange bag is definitely something that needs to be fixed immediately, I considered Alice packs but I don't find them very comfortable. I got this pack for just under 50 bucks and I'm thinking about trying to paint it or something (don't know if it would be worth it) because I really like the fit, very comfortable for the pack size. I've also considered tarps but I don't really want one of the cheap ones because they are bulky, but then the ultralight ones are expensive enough that you might as well get a tent in my humble opinion. Took care of food today added some Wise dehydrated food packages.

Thanks for the input

If you have an old tent rainfly, that will work as covering as well as shelter.


Offline vtsurvival

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Re: Post Pictures of Your Bug Out Bags
« Reply #158 on: November 09, 2012, 07:48:08 AM »
I am seeing a lot of effort to plan, make and prepare for what could come.  I am seeing very good ideas from you ladies and gentlemen. But what I would like to have seen in some of these posts is how you practice using some of what you have packed.  I am a SERE officer in the military and have extensive survival training.  What I can express the most to all of us, myself included is a part of you list should be a training schedule.  I noticed one post had a member with his gear using or at least out in the field ready.  Another thing I have noticed is when reading on bug out gear I see many members here and my students use commercial type equipment.  One thought on commercial equipment is that stuff is designed to be produced at the lowest cost and sold for way more than it is worth.  A suggestion I can make is military surplus was designed for rough use and easy repair on the go.  It last longer and you don't get that "I really paid that much for one use" feeling. 

So as this thread progresses lets all include a little more information.  How long are you intending this gear to last, how much practice and interaction with others for the same purpose do you involve yourself and what are your long term plan if returning home becomes not an option.  Also post EMP communication and food.

Thank you all and keep up the good work.

Offline Wildthang

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Re: Post Pictures of Your Bug Out Bags
« Reply #159 on: November 25, 2012, 07:20:56 AM »
Heres whats in it:

1) Bible


I like your first pick.
Need to add one to mine as well.

Thanks

This is probably one of the most practical lightweight packs I have seen on here. It seems to have all the basics covered and does not weigh 70 pounds! All it needs is enough food for 3 days and it is pefect!

Good job man!

Offline Greekman

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Re: Post Pictures of Your Bug Out Bags
« Reply #160 on: December 08, 2012, 12:14:31 PM »
Ok, here goes my Modular BugOut Bag / Gear System
Please see this post for further clarification

Some Notes:
-   Easy to distinguish items are not numbered.
-   There are some items purposefully left out. Water, Sleeping bag, Food, Clothes. Too much chore to haul out.
-   Level 4 is in a pack but this does not mean it will be carried on foot too. It is more of an auxiliary one with all the niceties and refill gear.

Level 1 - EDC items



Level 2 – Survival Items (carried in a Funny Pack)



1. Dark Chocolate & Sesame Bar
2. Rescue Blanket + Pill Pack
3. Wet & Dry Wipes
4. Nylon line, zipties & Kevlar rope
5. AA Flashlight (custom light engine)
6. Zebralight Headlamp (mind turning item!)
7. DuctTape & Liquid Soap
8. Emergency Charger (to be retired)
9. Coffee Filter, Folding Funnel & Water Purification Tabs

Level 2A – Day Hike Gear. No.2A is added to no.2, all carried in a Versipack clone ATM.



Poncho with pegs and cord, trash bag, mora knife, bug repellant (photoshoped in)

Level 3 – BOB



1.   Tyvek groundsheet, 2 bags
2.   Milk jug (extra water container) holds various heavy, hard items. Batteries, Zip-ties, wire, etc.
3.   Emergency Bivvy
4.   Hygiene Pack. Towel, gloves, dishwashing soap, etc
5.   Glo-Toob marker
6.   Monocular (Nicula x7) an amazing item purchased for just a few dollars from overstock
7.   Tube, holds 2 lightsticks



1.   FAK
2.   Cup cover made from a can
3.   Coffee filters with a clear sheet homemade funnel (they need support when used, else they tore)
4.   Fuel tabs individually sealed

Level 4 – The Support Pack



1.   Powerbank (holds 4x18650 lithium batteries) + Connectors
2.   Small folding antenna with connector & radials (to be replaced with a better model)
3.   Small tools (the supplement the Laatherman)
4.   Radio AA battery pack (E91s inside)
5.   PVC tube with more chemlights, roll of marker tape bellow it
6.   Water purification tabs



1.   Tarp + shelter equipment
2.   18650 batteries
3.   Dereelight DBS flashlight, with custom light engine (my other specialty)
4.   Small window alarm with fishing line spool
5.   Wine Bladder
6.   Nitrile Chemical gloves
7.   (missing) FAK refill pack

So.. that’s it.

I hope you get the idea how items pile up making a progressively complete kit with little overlaping of items

I am open to any critique, Greekman
« Last Edit: December 08, 2012, 12:22:29 PM by GreekMan »

Offline bcksknr

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Bivy Bag
« Reply #161 on: December 23, 2012, 09:24:12 PM »
I see that you have an Adventure Medical Kit Emergency Bivy Bag. Just a thought for its use. It gets really cold here in winter, so I keep a -20 degree goose down sleeping bag in my kit. It's the best warmth for the weight and size (compressibility). However, in below freezing temperature it is better to put the bivy inside the bag, rather than the other way around. Your body will give off water vapor as you sleep and will freeze in the down, rendering it useless very quickly. By putting the Bivy Bag inside it will act as a vapor barrier, preventing this. You may feel "clammy" at first as the humidity in the bag goes up, but you will stop perspiring at a certain level (not as in heat exhaustion). This issue is more of a problem with down bags versus synthetic fills, however they to will also "ice up". In really cold weather, we put our feet in a plastic bag, then wool socks, then felt pack boots. Yes, your feet will sweat, but your insulation will stay dry and your feet will stay warm. Remember to adjust your gear to match the seasons, especially if your pack will store in a vehicle where it could freeze! 

Offline Greekman

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Re: Bivy Bag
« Reply #162 on: December 24, 2012, 10:44:35 AM »
wise advice...

But i have some catching up to do on the vapor barrier liners. A year ago I heard about them but what i got is that it works if you do it right. Since I have not given it any more thought/look it would be wise to have a (better) look at it again.

thanks....
« Last Edit: December 24, 2012, 10:49:36 AM by GreekMan »

Offline pi_cube

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Re: Post Pictures of Your Bug Out Bags
« Reply #163 on: January 24, 2013, 01:09:45 PM »
These are all great ideas.  Thanks for sharing.  I keep a deck of cards in my BOB.  It can help pass some time when there is time to kill.

Offline North WI Thriver

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Re: Post Pictures of Your Bug Out Bags
« Reply #164 on: February 20, 2013, 08:39:54 AM »
These are all great ideas.  Thanks for sharing.  I keep a deck of cards in my BOB.  It can help pass some time when there is time to kill.

Since my bugout kit has to include stuff for 3 kids aged 3-10, time killers are a must.  Cards, and a good fantasy novel that can be read aloud like The Hobbit

Offline Hootie

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Re: Post Pictures of Your Bug Out Bags
« Reply #165 on: February 20, 2013, 08:44:40 AM »
4.   Small window alarm with fishing line spool

Got to ask... whats with the "window alarm"?  using the magnet in it?

or are you using it for fishing?  ;D

Offline Greekman

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Re: Post Pictures of Your Bug Out Bags
« Reply #166 on: February 21, 2013, 12:04:47 AM »
Got to ask... whats with the "window alarm"?  using the magnet in it?

or are you using it for fishing?  ;D

Sort of a security measure/trap....tie the fishing line on the magnet, hold it in place with rubber band....Lien is pulled and the alrm goes off...
bad pic of the contraption
http://imageshack.us/a/img171/9193/0088kg.jpg

Offline bcksknr

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Re: Post Pictures of Your Bug Out Bags
« Reply #167 on: February 21, 2013, 10:00:40 AM »
Greekman: I too like the "box-of-wine" mylar bladders. I would suggest a fabric carrying bag to support the weight; remember it was designed to be in a box when filled. This also helps with punctures if set on the ground. Also, that aluminized Mylar gives you a huge signalling device.

Offline Greekman

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Re: Post Pictures of Your Bug Out Bags
« Reply #168 on: February 23, 2013, 12:25:48 AM »
indeed.....I was thinking more line a liner made out of a tshirt etc.

What mistake I see in many BObs is that they lack means to really carry water. 2 water bottles hardly cut it when you have to carry water from miles away to your downed car. Especially when you have to use for boiling/filtering.

PS waht Is not seen is a can of ready made tea, (it rides in a big ziplock with BOb food) It is not only a comfort item, it is also a second water boiling container.

Offline thickice

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Re: Post Pictures of Your Bug Out Bags
« Reply #169 on: November 17, 2013, 07:12:11 AM »
I have read all the posts, and complement you all for the photographs.  Obviously a lot of thought have went into these bags.  Different situations dictate different contents, so there isn't a standardized bag contents.  One thing I did notice, most of the bags and contents show little if any use.  Items still in factory packaging, knives that show no wear/use, packs that show no indication of ever being worn.  I would encourage you to actually go out on a "survival" week end, using only what is in your bags.

Offline Greekman

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Re: Post Pictures of Your Bug Out Bags
« Reply #170 on: November 17, 2013, 10:00:42 AM »
well the BOB is such a beast, lives in the dark corners of the house and rarely shows its ugly face... ;D

Idealy one would have a duplicate set, BOB items and use items.
I personaly I exchange cost with effort. I exgahnge the "on call" tems with "work" before a campout. My gloves are an example. You don't want to see my work gloves, they are for the second mending of, and rather useless too.
Then some items are not to be used. My SOL bivy will barely make it through a night outdors, unless yuo sleep motionless liek a mummy. I took it out once at home, got into it,saw that is a tight fit and made an estimate of the temp comfort level.

On the other hand I will agree with the unpacked items. It shows less interest in proper organizing, and guys....don't yuo still feel like a kid that cannot wait for his cristmass gift?

Offline The Professor

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Re: Post Pictures of Your Bug Out Bags
« Reply #171 on: November 17, 2013, 02:16:45 PM »
In our case, we have knock-around gear that we take camping/hiking/etc.  The equipment is run through a ringer when we go out.  If it works, then we buy additional items and keep those in our kits.  The only real exceptions to these are our knives.  They go with whatever we're carrying out the door.

The Professor

Offline bcksknr

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Re: Post Pictures of Your Bug Out Bags
« Reply #172 on: November 20, 2013, 02:28:44 AM »
     I see very few kits with "zip ties". I keep a bundle of the heaviest ones I could find. They can only be removed by cutting. Along with making or repairing things, they are an easy way to secure troublesome folks to immovable objects, enabling you to walk away without being followed.
     Great minds think alike. I too have discovered the window alarm. There is one on the market that has a "pull pin" to activate it. The other is two pieces, with a magnet switch. Camoed, wrapped with a rubber band to keep it together and tied to a tree with a trip wire, they make ok perimeter alarms. I would imagine they could be modded to activate a "flashbang" or flare.

Offline mech7.62

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Re: Post Pictures of Your Bug Out Bags
« Reply #173 on: January 04, 2014, 03:31:38 PM »
These posts are great. Thanks for the ideas.

Offline Fourtybelow_Zero

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Re: Post Pictures of Your Bug Out Bags
« Reply #174 on: February 07, 2014, 09:22:09 PM »
Here we go...

All packed


Unpacked




Exploded




And heres the full list.. Firearms not listed or shown..

Tan Multipurpose zipper bag
o   100ft Coyote paracord
o   Kobalt mini crobar
o   Leatherman Wave
o   CRKT Eat’N’Tool XL
o   Smiths diamond knife sharpener
o   Gorrilla Duct tape
o   2x XL zip ties
o   Pocket wire saw
o   Collapsible cup
o   Clorox wipes To’Go

Dark Grey Multipurpose zipper bag
o   SOL 2 person thermal blanket
o   Ozark Trail hooded poncho
o   2x Orion red signal flares (5 min)
o   2x Black trash bags
o   3x Green Cyalume Snaplights (12hr)
o   Gerber/BG Fire steel and magnesium stick
o   LifeStraw water filter
o   UST Starflash signal mirror
o   BG Mini survival guide

Food+ Small Tackle Box
o   Stormproof matches
o   3x Esbit Fuel tabs
o   Esbit Emergency folding stove
o   Wetfire tinder tablet
o   32x Beef/Chicken Bouillon cubes
o   1x Micropur Sodium Chlorite water purification tablet (4hr)
o   Spice straws
o   Sugar
o   Salt
o   Crushed red pepper
o   Herbs De Province
o   Yellow Curry
o   Garlic Salt
o   Postum
o   Montreal Steak Seasoning

Waterproof Firebox (Red Gasket)
o   Bic Lighter
o   8x Wetfire tinder tablets
o   9hr Candle
o   Stormproof matches
o   Magnesium/firesteel
o   Folding pocketknife
o   1Yd Tinfoil

Blue Nalgene Bottle
o   Metal Cup w/ folding handle
o   Gorilla duct tape
o   Potable Aqua water purification tablets (Iodide base)
o   Potable Aqua+  neutralizing tablets
o   Micropur water purification tablets (Chlorite base)
o   Misc filter/Camelbak attatchments and parts
o   Steripen prefilter attatchment

Blue Sack Personal Items
o   Degree deodorant
o   Mini Vaseline
o   Floss
o   Toothbrush
o   Toothpaste
o   Goldbond powder
o   Dead Down Wind hand sanitizer
o   Eye Drops
o   Bzk Body cleaning towels
o   Tums
o   Mini playing cards
o   Colman compressed towels
o   Mini bug spray
o   Cottonelle flushable wipes
o   Carmex lip balm

Faraday bag
o 1Gal Mylar bag
     o   Green sack
       ? Goal Zero w/ Guide10 batter charger  (4 AA inside)
       ? 2x Midland Xtratalk 2way radios (6 AAA) (only use channel 8-14)
       ? Energizer headlamp (3 AAA)
       ? Bushnell Backtrack point-point GPS and Compass (2 AAA)
       ? Steripen Traveler UV water purifier (4 Lithium AA)
       ? Rocky flashlight (3 AAA)
       ? Misc bag
           • Guide 10 AAA adapter w/ 4 AAA
           • Goal Zero Usb light
           • iPhone Charging cable
           • Usb-Mini usb cable
           • Goal Zero 12V car adapter

Black Multipurpose Zipper Bag
o   Yellow Rite in the Rain all weather notebook
o   2x Cyalume Snaplights
o   SAS Pocket Survival Guide
o   2 Way radio manual
o   Vacuum sealed Book Of Mormon
o   Zerbra ballpoint pen

3x Repackages MRE’s

Mountain House Freeze Dried Food
o   Spaghetti w/ meat sauce
o   Macaroni and cheese
o   2x Rice and chicken
o   Beef stew
o   2x Granola w/ milk and blueberries
o   Icecream sandwich

Jetboil Flash w/ Storm matches inside
SOL 2 person thermal bivvy
Large Brown tarp
Gerbel LMF II w/ leg strap
Carabiner w/ 50ft green paracord spooled
Cyalume Snaplight holder/hider w/ one inside
2x Cyalume Snaplights
Gerber Gator Machete
Geber Hatchet
No Limits 2 person tent w/ rain cover, 2x XL Snaplights
Ka-Bar Black knife

Camelbak MULE
o   Black Water bladder w/ hydrolink connectors and frontier pro water filter attatched
o   Spare Camelbak bladder

Spacesaver bag w/ full change of clothes
2x Smartwater 1.5 L
2x Smartwater .7 L

Red First Aid
o   Qtips
o   2x Cyalume Snaplights (12hr)
o   4x Crazyglue Singles
o   Tweezers
o   Latex gloves
o   Various Band-Aids, gauss pads/rolls
o   Safety pins
o   Compression bandage
o   Salinaxx saline eye wash
o   Instant cold pack
o   2x Hand warmers (10hr)
o   Bottle of Ibuprofen (100 tablets 200mg)
o   Woundseal blood clotting powder (4 Single use pouches)
o   Various single use painkillers
o   Antihisamine tablets (allergy, 14 tablets)
o   Nyquil (4 Doses)
o   Antidiarrheal (12 Tablets)
o   Triple Antibiotic
o   Various single use creams, ointments and wipes (Hydrocortisone, burn gel, etc)
o   Tape
o   Hydrogen peroxide
o   Bite And Sting kit
        ?   Alcohol Pads
        ?   Sting relief pads
        ?   Disposable razor
        ?   The Extractor pump w/ 4 adapters
        ?   Band-Aids
        ?   Manual









Offline Cedar

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Re: Post Pictures of Your Bug Out Bags
« Reply #175 on: February 07, 2014, 09:43:39 PM »

Offline Fourtybelow_Zero

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Re: Post Pictures of Your Bug Out Bags
« Reply #176 on: February 07, 2014, 09:49:33 PM »
Do you know the weight?

Cedar

Well, Ive nicknamed it 'The Beast'

42 lbs Woo!

Offline Cedar

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Re: Post Pictures of Your Bug Out Bags
« Reply #177 on: February 07, 2014, 10:25:33 PM »
Well, Ive nicknamed it 'The Beast'
42 lbs Woo!

That is not hideous. But 42 pounds does get heavy after a bit. With my daughter weighing 30 pounds now, I need to try to shave 12 pounds off my pack, it was 28. So now I have to get it down to 16 to 20-ish. As I have to carry her and my BOB at this point, but getting her ramped up for hiking again, but with her own 5 pound pack.

Cedar

Offline BULL-IT

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Re: Post Pictures of Your Bug Out Bags
« Reply #178 on: February 09, 2014, 12:23:21 PM »
I was going to try and make a minimal bug out bag... just the necessities. I am staring with a grey ghost gear light weight pack. Once I get it all done I'll post pics.


Offline The Professor

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Re: Post Pictures of Your Bug Out Bags
« Reply #179 on: May 11, 2014, 07:53:34 PM »
Okay, so I combined an earlier post in another thread with the photos for this one.

Before I go into an extremely lengthy discourse, I do want to make a few caveats and explanations.


Wow.  Five years ago, I posted the above list of my BOB/PERK.  I just happened to run across it this morning and thought that, since I have a bit of extra time, I'd go ahead and do an update.

For those who are curious, here's the link to my original post with all the original lists:

http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=1508.msg56520#msg56520

Very little has changed to the mission statement of our PERK's.  Mainly what has changed is the equipment and supplies.  In it's current form, it presupposes a Permissive/non-Hostile Environment.  We have additional modules that can be included for such things as Hostile Environments (aka, bullets are already flying), extended Support (7 additional days of food), Enhanced Medical, etc.

But, for this post, I'll concentrate on the Basic Kit.



As you can see, the basic layout from the original kit has changed only slightly.  The original pack was an early version of the air-droppable Camelbak Big Jump.  The side pockets were older Eagle Industries pockets originally meant to augment their AIII pack.  While the original system worked, there were a number of problems with it.

First, the CamelBak was heavy for it's size.  That's because it was jumpable and well over-built for it's intended use (well, technically, MY intended use. . . I can't foresee a situation where I would have to egress an airplane with my gear).

The side pouches were difficult to organize and open as well as extract equipment.  One of the pouches was a full medical kit, including Blow-Out Kit, while the other was essentially a minimalist Ditch Kit (i.e., if your situation suddenly necessitated speed and I had to drop my heavier kit, I could sling this over a shoulder and have the bare minimum equipment to survive).

Again, due to the design, it wasn't as user-friendly as I wanted.

This was found out after several actual bug-out drills.  We have a primary retreat location within 45 miles of our home and have made several trips on foot, an via bicycle, to shake down our gear.  Additionally, we have used several other opportunities to better maximize and simplify the use of our gear.

So, the changes are as follow:

First, we swapped the main packs out for Kifaru Navigators.  They're a little lighter than the CamelBaks and much simpler.   The lower section has a divided sleeping bag compartment and a 3/4 length double zipper, making it easier to access things in the lower section.  The back of the pack has similar 3/4 length zipper that opens a large flap allowing access to the interior.  The flap, itself, is covered in MOLLE both inside and out as is the entire pack.  The flap is also a zippered "sleeve" that allows you to store items. Inside the pack is a hydration pocket that will hold a large bladder.

While the Camelbak allowed me to sort things, sometimes it was more than difficult, especially in low-light conditions, to find things.  Worse yet, if I couldn't find something, I'd have to sort through several compartments.  Under extreme stress, this may slow me down or even result in lost supplies/equipment if I forget to rezip a compartment

Additionally, I feel the Kifaru is a more robust pack than the Camelbak. I have no problems with tossing the full pack over a fence or out a 2nd story window.  I know it wont' spill open.  With one exception, I know that my equipment will still be functional (the one item that may break is the Katadyn Filter, for which I have several alternate water purfication options).

In the Main Pack (#1) is the following:

1  100oz Water bladder
1  Katadyn Expedition Water Filter w/ cleaning kit
1  Set of Clothing, to include:
    1  Pair Pants
    1  Long Sleeve Shirt
    2  T-Shirts, Sweat Wicking, Non-Flammable
    3  Pair UnderArmour  9" light compression Shorts
    4  Pair Thorlo Socks
    1  Pair Elk-skin Gloves
    1  Pair Nomex Gloves
    1  Neckerchief/Shemagh
    1  Patrol Cap
4  Complete MRES (stripped of cardboard and repackaged in ziploc bags)
10 Millenium Bars
8  Pouches 3oz Weight Gainer Powder Mix
1  Hygiene Kit to include:
    1  Microfiber Towel, Large
    1  Washcloth
    1  Bar, Anti-scent soap (Not unscented)
    1  Razor w/ 2 Extra Heads
    1  Toothbrush
    1  Tube Toothpaste
    1  Roll Floss
    1  Unbreakable Mirror

1  Gerber Omnivore Flashlight
1  100' 550 Cord
3  Large, Contractor-grade Trashbags
2  45-gallon standard trashbags.
2  Rolls Toilet Paper
1  Sleeping System consisting of :
    1  Goretex Bivvy Bag
    1  Seasonally-Appropriate Sleeping Bag
    1  Big Agnes Inflatable Ground Pad

1  Personal Data Kit (Small, zippered notebook with personal data, insurance, etc.)
1  Set of Waterproofed Maps
1  Suunto Compass
1  Repair Kit
16 AA Lithium Batteries
8  CR123 Batteries
1  Large Tube Sunblock
1  Large Bottle Bug Repellent

On the waist best of the kit (and unseen in the photo) are two Maxpedition Nalgene water bottle carriers.  Each carrier has a zippered pouch which holds 20 coffee filters in a ziploc bag, a Sham-wow in a ziploc bag and two bottles of Aqua Mira water purification system.  Instead of the heavier Nalgene bottles, however, I use one Gatorade bottle and one mixer bottle as used by weightlifters for protein shakes, etc.

I swapped out both of the side-pouches for better options.  The first is a SatCom bag (Bag #2 in picture) originally intended to hold a Trivec AV2040 Satellite Communications Antenna. This, I turned into a Ditch Kit:



On the upper outside left of the closed bag there is a Tomahawk Flashlight.  When attached properly to the main kit, this can be used as a white or red light to shine on the path, ahead.  It can also be removed for hand-held use.  On the right, you can see a Cold Steel Frontier Hawk.  From my experiences, I don't need a full-sized axe.  Previously, I carried a Gransfors Brux Small Forest Axe.  This saves at least a pound but still gives me the ability to chop and hammer.

The design of the Satcom bag allows it to be opened much more easily and provide greater access than the previous side pouches.  It's also a bit larger.  You can't see it in the pictures, but there's also a small water-bladder-type pouch on the back of the pack as well as zippered pockets on each side and it's easier to throw over the shoulder.  MOLLE on two sides allows attachments of other pouches or, in my case, the carrier for the tomahawk and flashlight.

Inside is the following:

1  Minimag Flashlight
1  AM/FM/SW Portable Radio.
100' 550 Cord
1  Gerber Strikeforce
1  Firemaking kit
100 Waterproof matches
1  8-hour Candle
1  Silnylon Shelter
1  Heavy Duty Solar Blanket
1  Cook Kit w/ Esbit Stove and cleaning kit
1  Hammock
1/2 roll Toilet paper
12  Millennium Bars
16 AA Lithium Batteries
4  CR123 Batteries
1  Small Bottle Sunblock
1  Small Bottle Bug Repellent


On the other side I replaced one side pouch with an Eagle Sustainment Pouch (Pouch #3 in picture) and a removable Blow-Out Kit (Pouch #4)

The Sustainment pouch is more of a convenience pouch. I put most of the First Aid Kit in there as well as footcare items and a 1 of the Bag's MRE's and a couple food bars.  Mainly, it's there so I dont' have to open the main kit every time I stop.  Most of the first aid Kit is in a Tupperware container that fills 2/3rds of the pouch.  These are regular supplies for non-trauma issues.  Cuts, intestinal distress, blisters, etc.

Pouch #4 is a standard Blow Out Kit intended for traumatic injuries.  This is one of those pouches that has a panel covered on the front in Velcro and attached on the back via MOLLE to the Main Bag.   The back of the pouch also has Velcro which holds it to the panel and is further held in place by a simple strap and Fastex buckle.  If you need it, just pop a Fastex Buckle and rip the pouch off the velcro panel.  You then have a three-tiered Blow-Out Kit that can be easily carried or accessed.

Since this has gone on too long, already, I'll abbreviate the last two items in my kit:   The first is the Clothing Bag.  I have a bag in each of the vehicles that holds a full set of "bug-out" clothing in case something happens and I'm not wearing sturdy enough clothes.  This way, if the apocalypse happens while I'm at the gym swimming or out doing a Nekkid 5k, I have a bag of clothing appropriate to the task.

1  Clothing Bag Consisting of:
    1   Pair Pants
    1   Shirt, Long Sleeve
    1   T-Shirt, Sweat-wicking, Fire Resistant
    1   Pair, Compression Shorts
    1   Pair, Thorlo Socks
    1   Pair, Nomex Gloves
    1   Shemagh
    1   Hat, Boonie-Style
    1   Pair, Boots

Finally, I have taken some items that are universal to various kits and put them together that ride along with the Clothing Bag.  While most of the time I wear good clothing and have my EDC items that will help, I can't always assume that I'll have them with me.  So, I've made a smaller kit filled with "EDC"-type items that can augment what I have with me.

I just call this an EDC Kit:



Basically, it's a Condor T&T Pouch (A copy of Tactical Tailor's Admin Pouch) which contains:

1  Leatherman Wave
1  Fenix LD15 AA Flashlight
1  Sunglasses Carrier with tinted and clear Safety glasses inside
1  Bucklite folding knife
1  Millenium Bar
1  Mini Mag Lite (it's sort of a good luck charm)
1  Scrapyard knives Scrapivore Neck Knife
1  Pair Mini Binoculars
1  Zippo Lighter
1  LifeStraw
2  1-pt, Platypus bladders (in pocket)
1  Spray Bottle Bug Spray
1  Spray Bottle Sun Block
2  Carbon-impregnated facemasks
1  Bottle, Iodine Tabs
1  Space Pen
1  Notepad
4  AA Lithium Batteries

This last kit pretty much stays in the car.  If something bad happens, I can take what I need and leave the rest.

Anyway, I just thought it might be interesting to see how someone's kit has evolved over time.

The Professor