Author Topic: compost question  (Read 17289 times)

Offline smittymojoe

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Re: compost question
« Reply #30 on: February 22, 2009, 10:03:24 AM »
We just bought a bin to keep some worms in.

Can you add ash from the fire place to the compost pile? How much it too much?

John Willis
www.SOEetacticalgear.com

Good question John, I would like to know also. I have some ashes that could go in my pile. I would think that you'd have to be careful and not add too much.
Anyone else have more to add about putting ash in the compost pile?

smitty

Offline Roswell

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Re: compost question
« Reply #31 on: February 22, 2009, 07:04:49 PM »
We just bought a bin to keep some worms in.

Can you add ash from the fire place to the compost pile? How much it too much?

John Willis
www.SOEetacticalgear.com

Good question John, I would like to know also. I have some ashes that could go in my pile. I would think that you'd have to be careful and not add too much.
Anyone else have more to add about putting ash in the compost pile?

smitty



I am new to composting, but I found this site that is really useful.  http://www.compostguide.com/  It even has a graph on what to compost and what not to.  According to it though, ashes are bad. Don't do it.

Offline J.R. Morelli

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Re: compost question
« Reply #32 on: February 23, 2009, 06:15:36 PM »
I'm not sure if this is the place, but I've got some other items which I was wondering if were okay to compost. If you know yes/no/ and especially *why* that would really help! Thanks  8)

Processed foods like bread/pasta?
Human Hair?
Dog Hair?
Alcohol? (ie warm forgotten beer? in small quantities of course)
Heavily inked/glossy paper? (I now newspaper is okay but  what about magazines and such?)
Dog feces? (I've heard some say yes and others say no)

Offline Roswell

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Re: compost question
« Reply #33 on: February 23, 2009, 06:48:46 PM »
Well crap.  The link I posted appears dead now and appears to be redirecting.   This is another good one though. http://www.howtocompost.org/cat_generalinfo.asp

Offline Roswell

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Re: compost question
« Reply #34 on: February 23, 2009, 06:57:26 PM »
I'm not sure if this is the place, but I've got some other items which I was wondering if were okay to compost. If you know yes/no/ and especially *why* that would really help! Thanks  8)

Processed foods like bread/pasta?
Human Hair?
Dog Hair?
Alcohol? (ie warm forgotten beer? in small quantities of course)
Heavily inked/glossy paper? (I now newspaper is okay but  what about magazines and such?)
Dog feces? (I've heard some say yes and others say no)


i wouldn't use bread or pasta, just because I think it would take a while to break down. and the bread would mold. you want to avoid that in your pile.
No hair. we use chemicals in our soap and shampoo
no beer. it has yeast which can grow and you don't want that
no magazines.  too many chemicals
no human or pet feces.Dog and cat feces may carry diseases that can infect humans. It is best NEVER to use them in compost piles. Some people do bury them 8" deep in the soil, but ONLY in areas where food crops are never grown.

Offline J.R. Morelli

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Re: compost question
« Reply #35 on: February 23, 2009, 11:59:01 PM »
Cool, Thanks Roswell for the info and the links. I pretty much assumed most if not all of those were a NO but I just wanted to be sure. Like many I'm new to composting and new to the idea of thinking about what breaks down well and why, versus what could have other things in it that would grow and not rot in the way you'd want compost to. Thanks a lot for giving that much more detail, And thanks for the links, I'll check them out.  8)

Offline Roswell

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Re: compost question
« Reply #36 on: February 24, 2009, 05:45:26 AM »
Glad I could help. :)

Offline Doug

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Re: compost question
« Reply #37 on: March 01, 2009, 07:14:02 PM »
an easy source for compost is from dairy farms. Large dairy farms are required to treat their cow manure. They flush the stuff into a pond and the solids gets composted.

The wife and I use to have a garden (were now putting in a new one). I got the compost from a dairy that would compost the solids and then reuse it for bedding. They would then re-compost the bedding along with new manure when their stalls were cleaned out. Their compost pile was maybe 50' long and 7' high. At the time they only charged me $20 to load up my 16' implement using their tractor's front-end loader.

What about the smell if you live in the city? The compost had a smell when I first shoveled it onto the garden but the smell was completely gone as soon as I tilled it in.

Offline jetta2337

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Re: compost question
« Reply #38 on: March 09, 2009, 10:14:35 AM »
I also need an answer about the smell? I live in a snobby little community outside of town that wont like the smell if it does. I am just going to do grass clippings and the organic stuff.
I have an old sand pit where I was going to put it with some pallets around it.

Offline Roswell

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Re: compost question
« Reply #39 on: March 09, 2009, 01:35:54 PM »
I think that as long as you are just doing yard refuse and table scraps the smell is really unnoticeable.  It only gets bad when you start putting manure in it.

Offline Hraz

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Re: compost question
« Reply #40 on: March 09, 2009, 02:48:32 PM »
I wonder if a little lime would get rid of any smell, if there is any?

Garrman

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Re: compost question
« Reply #41 on: March 10, 2009, 02:40:02 PM »
Just for info....
The best compost is made with lots of manure...
And it does smell some especially when it is at peak temperature...
It usually gets a lot less after that point...
It mostly smells when you turn it over....

Hope that helps...

Offline jetta2337

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Re: compost question
« Reply #42 on: March 11, 2009, 08:41:10 AM »
Thanks guys great input and what I was looking for.
As for the manure does the stink go down if it is dry? I have access to tons of the stuff but I just cant let it stink due to the HOA. To if I put some real dry sheep and cow manure in if it would cut the stink down also?

Offline Doug

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Re: compost question
« Reply #43 on: March 11, 2009, 08:55:36 AM »
Thanks guys great input and what I was looking for.
As for the manure does the stink go down if it is dry? I have access to tons of the stuff but I just cant let it stink due to the HOA. To if I put some real dry sheep and cow manure in if it would cut the stink down also?

Try a test spot first, till it in, and then see if if smells. If it's well composted and if your experience is like mine there won't be a smell. I got mine from a dairy that composted its manure and used it as bedding for their cows after it was dry. On my garden I used an 8'x16' trailer load, so I used a lot.

Garrman

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Re: compost question
« Reply #44 on: March 11, 2009, 11:17:39 AM »

To if I put some real dry sheep and cow manure in if it would cut the stink down also?


the only issue I see is that when you add moisture, because water is an important factor in composting, it will smell some... I'm not saying a lot but some.
The micro organisms need moisture to eat the organic material... Not too much but good and moist...
Compost imho is the very best growing soil additive there is..............
If you're using a pile instead of a barrel then the smell is less also...

Offline Doug

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Re: compost question
« Reply #45 on: March 11, 2009, 01:29:47 PM »
All I can tell you, Garrman, is that I got an 8' x 16' x 4' high trailer load from a dairy (cost $20 and they loaded it) that I put onto our gardern. There was a smell and some flies until i tilled it in. After I tilled it in the smell and flies were complete gone even with watering the plants. I'd buy a load from them about evey two years.

Somebody mentioned lime. Dallas' blackland soil is already high in calcium so that might be some reason why the smell was gone. I can't say the same for sandy soils low in calcium. In the city I'd try a small area, 2'x2', of your garden and see what happens.

I can't say about the sheep manure. The thing about the dairy where I got my compost is that today large daries are required to wash the manure's liquids (pee) into a holding pond for bacteria to work on. Where I got mine, the solids then got stacked onto a long cement slab to be composted. As one pile was drying/composting the greener stuff was piled down the slab. Once dry they either reused the compost in the stalls as bedding, to be recomposted later, or it was spread on pastures.

Garrman

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Re: compost question
« Reply #46 on: March 12, 2009, 11:34:17 AM »
I am sure what you are saying about the compost you bought or any compost for that matter will react the same way...
When it is tilled in the smell goes away even when watered...
you are right... what i was referring to was in the making of compost...
The cooking causes some odor that is all....
Sounds like you have a good system and I know it is good to use what works....
Lime is not used around where I live as the soil is already alkaline we use gypsum to help keep the clay soil broken up...

Offline jetta2337

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Re: compost question
« Reply #47 on: March 16, 2009, 03:18:06 PM »
What about paper. The wife cleans a doctors office and they shred a ton of paper. I will get a lot of grass clippings from my yard to much I fear would the paper help with the dry or brown part of the compost?

Offline Roswell

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Re: compost question
« Reply #48 on: March 16, 2009, 04:30:47 PM »
I have used shredded paper before and it works great. Shredded newspaper is even better.  The only paper I would hesitate using is magazine or anything glossy like that. 

Offline archer

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Re: compost question
« Reply #49 on: March 16, 2009, 04:34:18 PM »
letter sized paper and newspaper works great as a brown as Roswell says. But those glossy adds? Burn/recycle in another way.

Offline Roswell

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Re: compost question
« Reply #50 on: March 16, 2009, 06:40:14 PM »
letter sized paper and newspaper works great as a brown as Roswell says. But those glossy adds? Burn/recycle in another way.

yeah, most post offices have dumpsters marked 'magazines' where you can recycle them

Offline jetta2337

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Re: compost question
« Reply #51 on: March 17, 2009, 08:25:11 AM »
99% of the paper is shreaded from faxes that come, none of it is the glossy paper or mag paper. Thanks all for that for it is a good to be able to reuse that paper to help with the green.