Author Topic: Soviet Collapse Lessons Every American Needs To Know  (Read 1494 times)

Offline minrlwtr

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Soviet Collapse Lessons Every American Needs To Know
« on: January 22, 2009, 07:00:20 PM »
Alot of you might of seen this before but its worth showing again for those that havent had a chance to think it over.
http://madconomist.com/what-if-us-collapses-soviet-collapse-lessons-every-american-needs-to-know

Offline digger

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Re: Soviet Collapse Lessons Every American Needs To Know
« Reply #1 on: January 23, 2009, 09:25:58 PM »
I had not seen this before, thanks for the link.

Interesting comparisons. His point/slide#9 is what worries me about our country.

Quote
One important element of collapse-preparedness is making sure that you don't need a functioning economy to keep a roof over your head.

Having lived thru the downturn of the early 80's, I well remember the folks from Michigan & other northern states coming to Houston in droves. Broke, and with few belongings, the areas under our bridges & overpasses were filled with those who had nothing but a car to live out of. I crossed the San Jac river daily, to see folks there cooking over campfires by the river. Just over a year later when the oil patch collapsed is when the possibility of losing a homestead struck home. I prevailed, but it wasn't easy or fun. *That's* when I learned what prepping is really about.....

I watch a blog by FerFal, surviving Argentina, where he talks about the conditions and lessons learned when their economy collapsed a few years ago. Very informative.. I'm sure many here know of the blog already.

http://ferfal.blogspot.com/


Tommy Jefferson

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Re: Soviet Collapse Lessons Every American Needs To Know
« Reply #2 on: January 25, 2009, 09:45:11 AM »
Having lived thru the downturn of the early 80's, I well remember the folks from Michigan & other northern states coming to Houston in droves. Broke, and with few belongings, the areas under our bridges & overpasses were filled with those who had nothing but a car to live out of.

I remember that.  It was very sad.  As a teenager it made a big impression on me.  I vowed never to be in such a condition.

Their windows were down on the hottest days because their cars had no air conditioning.  They were sunburned because they didn't know about siesta and to stay out of the sun.  Their cars were rusty from the road salt used up north. 

I'll never forget standing in line at four in the morning with 300 men because the local paper mill had two job openings.  For months at a time the local newspaper classifieds employment section had only two ads; "1-800-POSTALJOBS" and "Work from home stuffing envelopes!".  I saw old former CPA accountants mowing yards.

It sucked, but we made it through.

Of course, the Wall-Street types who ran the failed Savings & Loans made out just fine on the backs of taxpayers, just like today.  Socialism as usual.