Author Topic: Grow and Share Seed Programs  (Read 18539 times)

Offline LvsChant

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Grow and Share Seed Programs
« on: April 18, 2011, 01:56:18 PM »
Relative to Jack's Podcast # 645 (April 18, 2011), let's post links to resources for seed sharing programs in various regions in the country.

The site mentioned in today's podcast is: http://www.growandshare.org/

LvsChant

Offline Humble Mechanic

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Re: Grow and Share Seed Programs
« Reply #1 on: April 19, 2011, 07:14:43 PM »
My wife is the one that sent the email to Jack.  I got a ton of seedlings from them.  I gave about half to my neighbor.  They planted what they could, then gave some to their brother(i think). 

Lets keep the sharing going everyone!

Offline LvsChant

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Re: Grow and Share Seed Programs
« Reply #2 on: April 19, 2011, 08:22:20 PM »
Thanks so much to you and your wife, Planet FooDog... and welcome to the forum. We appreciate the information and hope we can return the favor on some other issue.

Please stop by the intro thread if you get the chance,

LvsChant

Offline Humble Mechanic

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Re: Grow and Share Seed Programs
« Reply #3 on: May 01, 2011, 05:38:18 PM »
We also found that if you join @ www.arborday.org you get 10 free trees.  They also have a hazelnut project that for $20 you get 3 hazelnut bushes.  Its not really free but super cheap....

Offline LvsChant

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Re: Grow and Share Seed Programs
« Reply #4 on: May 01, 2011, 09:53:16 PM »
That looks like another great resource...

Offline bcksknr

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Re: Grow and Share Seed Programs
« Reply #5 on: June 17, 2012, 05:42:47 PM »
Hello; I hope this is the right forum for a seed storage question. A few years back, I bought a case (6 #10 cans) of nitrogen packed survival seeds at a rummage sale. There was no date on the labeling or list of contents, but for a buck a can I thought it was worth a shot. It was from a well known survival outfitter. I finally cracked one open this Spring (should have done it right away) and found that indeed there was a full garden worth of Northrup King seed. It was all marked for use in 1999! Of course, it was nitro packed for long term storage so I thought well, why not? The result was that not a single seed germinated. I wound up buying bedding plants and replanting the rest with fresh seed. Apparently 13 years was too long. I used to buy the next years seeds at the end of the planting season and just keep them in a jar until the following Spring. That way I had an emergency supply on the shelf and I never had any germination issues with that one year old seed. I'm going to start doing this again and I wondered if keeping the seed in a freezer might be a good idea. Any tips on safe seed storage for a one year period?

Offline LvsChant

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Re: Grow and Share Seed Programs
« Reply #6 on: June 17, 2012, 10:13:10 PM »
Too bad about the seeds, bcksknr...

I'm thinking the freezer storage year to year ought to work out just fine. We have a lot of very experienced seed savers here on the forum, so you'll probably get several comments about this question.

You may also want to check out the seed savers organization online. There are many who save and share seeds nationwide and many tips for saving your own seeds and storing them properly at their website.

Offline cohutt

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Re: Grow and Share Seed Programs
« Reply #7 on: August 02, 2012, 09:16:24 PM »
Freezer works-

heat and moisture are what degrade viability of seed, that's not what you get in a freezer

Offline hastingr

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Re: Grow and Share Seed Programs
« Reply #8 on: April 23, 2014, 10:52:15 AM »
I stored som e seeds in the freezer and got nearly 0% germination rate on my seeds. I now use the fridge instead.

Offline Cedar

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Re: Grow and Share Seed Programs
« Reply #9 on: April 23, 2014, 11:14:25 AM »
Any tips on safe seed storage for a one year period?

Keep them cold, keep them dry, keep them dark. All the things against of they want in order to grow.

I keep mine in a waterproof container. Never plastic, in glass if needed, usually in paper envelopes. Where it is dark, low humidity. I have seed that lasts YEARS!

Cedar

Offline DDJ

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Re: Grow and Share Seed Programs
« Reply #10 on: May 07, 2014, 10:43:26 AM »
My Wife just informed me that our county library has started a seed bank.  They have seeds to give and will accept seeds.  If we get a good production this yesr in the fal we are planning on donating soem to add to thier "collection".

Stark County Library, Canton Ohio

Offline Cedar

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Re: Grow and Share Seed Programs
« Reply #11 on: May 07, 2014, 10:56:00 AM »
I actually helped a Seed Bank at a library in Wisconsin when a friend who lives there hooked them up with me. If your local library does not have one, educate your library on what a 'seed library is' and get one happening in your community.

Cedar

Offline I.L.W.

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Re: Grow and Share Seed Programs
« Reply #12 on: October 03, 2015, 11:09:30 AM »
January 31, 2016
For those interested, the last saturday of January is the unofficial "National Seed Swap day".
Information can be found here: http://seedswapday.blogspot.com/

There are several organizations who collaborate to offer seed swapping events on this day, across the US. Some areas will set the date plus or minus a few days depending on facilities availability, so check ahead of time for the schedule in your area.

Not to far from me (in Rochester NY) there is already a listing for one of these events.
http://www.rcgc.org/0131ss-8th-annual-seed-and-houseplant-swap

If you intend to bring seeds to an event, this is likely the time you'll be collecting most of them. The favorites seem to be medicinal herbs, perennial flowers, and house plants.  Personally, I would like to see a better showing of fruit trees and bushes, and may break out the cloner this weekend to begin rooting a few hundred cuttings.

How to get involved in Seed Swap Events

• Bring a friend or two.

• While it's not required that you bring anything to share (there is often an extreme excess), the events are more successful with a wide variety of of plants. If you have something uncommon, please share.

• Etiquette dictates that you not clean out a vendor of their entire stock. As homesteaders, we can use 800 garlic plants, especially when they're free. But save some for the other visitors. Take a reasonable sample size. If you need more, talk to the person swapping. Odds are they have a lot more and you can work something out with them.

• Some of the booths are often used for fund raising. They'll swap seeds freely, but started plants may cost $1-$2 to support some cause. I'd recommend bringing $20-$30 cash. There are frequently food vendors as well, so have some money on you.

• Different groups have different expectations for how you bring your seeds in. Generally, no patented or GMO seeds. They should be labeled with the full botanical name. Ziploc sandwich bags and a sharpie make for good cheap seed packets.

• Some traders will print out business card sized info sheets. How to plant the seed, where it grows best, what the plant is used for etc. Sometimes just a card with a link or QR code to a blog page with descriptions or a youtube channel. This is not a necessity, but people appreciate it.

• Some events host lectures on seed saving, or related topics. If yours doesn't, you may want to volunteer to give one. FOr small hobby farms and homestead businesses, this is a great opportunity to increase your business's exposure to the local public.

• Retailers often make a showing with last years commercial seed packets. Seed dealers don't take them back at the end of the season (they're not worth shipping), but want them discarded before they ship the new packets. In my local feed store, they often have a full shopping cart full of seed packets for free around November. Lots of small businesses will bring these seeds to the swap.

• Bring some small bags with you. Many traders will simply have bulk seed in quart or gallon jars. You'll need something to transport the seeds in without getting them all mixed up. Since you may take moist cuttings, I recommend plastic, sealable bags. A cheap canvas grocery bag may also be helpful to carry around started plants.

Resources for seed packaging:

Printable Seed packet Templates
http://tipnut.com/seed-packets/

Royalty-free plant images:
http://www.freedigitalphotos.net/images/Vegetables_g63.html

Make a QR Code:
http://goqr.me/


Started plants in rock-wool and/or 2" net pots can have the roots wrapped in plastic wrap.

Scion wood and grape cuttings can be stored in 2-gallon freezer bags, wrapped  in moist paper towel either individually, or in small bundles .

Bulbs and tubers transport well in a box filled with shredded newspaper.