Author Topic: Storing pepper plants  (Read 14504 times)

Offline PreppingMom

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Re: Storing pepper plants
« Reply #30 on: November 08, 2011, 06:22:57 PM »
We have a lean-to type pvc and plastic covered "hoop house". It leans against the basement wall where some heat from our woodstove makes its way through the block wall to the greenhouse in addition to the warmth gained during the day from the sun. I also use Christmas lights through out. 

For two winters I have tried to overwinter peppers in the greenhouse and both times it failed - although I have a couple of avocado trees growing in there and a few small citrus trees, too, and they have survived 5+ winters. So, I'm trying it again this year with three pepper plants from the garden, only this time putting them next to the avocado up against the block wall in the middle of the 10X12 greenhouse - what should be the warmest part. Sooo, I'm thinking peppers must be pretty tender. I'll let you know in the spring if any make it.

Offline mckeyes

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Re: Storing pepper plants
« Reply #31 on: November 22, 2011, 11:06:19 AM »


Moved the plants to the basement over the weekend since the weather is going to get colder. The leaves have perked up a little since I watered them.

Offline CarolinaHiker

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Re: Storing pepper plants
« Reply #32 on: November 23, 2011, 04:09:00 PM »
Ok, here's my year two attempt.  Last year I brought in ten pepper plants and lost 60%.  Granted I wasn't the best at watering the ones that looked dead, four or five dropped all their leaves pretty quick.  Also, my crawlspace got down into the 40's.  Will try a little supplemental heat this year and sealing out the cold air better.  This year I brought in 28 pepper plants and my lemongrass.  Hoping to up my survival rate this time!  It will give me a really good head start next spring.   ;D  I actually kept one tomato plant alive last winter and it produced this summer.  I'd like to experiment with that again some time but didn't bring any in this year, it was a tough year for tomatoes here in NC and none of them were very healthy by late summer.








Offline kenser321

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Re: Storing pepper plants
« Reply #33 on: February 17, 2012, 09:30:11 PM »
I did this. I already had my pepper plants in containers since I live in an apartment. I brought them in, clipped all the suckers, pruned the plant to make it more tree like, removed dead leaves, and put in fertilizer spikes. I found white spider mites on my plant, but I havent found anything on them damaging anything living so I didn't bother them. However my other jalapeno plant had aphids and went outside to a frosty death. I was actually impressed my bell plant bloomed through the winter and even had a golf ball sized pepper growing on it. When it warms up again right back outside. I should probably have put worm tea or some kind of fert on it.

Offline mckeyes

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Re: Storing pepper plants
« Reply #34 on: April 17, 2012, 08:09:45 AM »
So my pepper plants did not make it through the winter.  :(
Next winter I'll try some lights and more frequent watering. Lessoned learned, pepper plants do not go dormant during the winter.

Offline PreppingMom

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Re: Storing pepper plants
« Reply #35 on: May 31, 2012, 01:48:46 PM »
For two winters I have tried to overwinter peppers in the greenhouse and both times it failed - although I have a couple of avocado trees growing in there and a few small citrus trees, too, and they have survived 5+ winters. So, I'm trying it again this year with three pepper plants from the garden, only this time putting them next to the avocado up against the block wall in the middle of the 10X12 greenhouse - what should be the warmest part. Sooo, I'm thinking peppers must be pretty tender. I'll let you know in the spring if any make it. November 2011

As promised I'm reporting back on my overwintered peppers! Of the three I put in pots into the greenhouse only one made it - and it was the one smack dab in the middle. And . . . . it took a beating! When I took it out to plant into the garden it was pretty scrawny looking with undersized leaves as all the big ones had dropped off. It has started to make a come back and has several buds ready to bloom. I planted it with three new peppers and will see if it is worth overwintering by what kind of production it has this season versus the new ones!


Offline Joe in TN

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Re: Storing pepper plants
« Reply #36 on: May 31, 2012, 02:22:35 PM »
I've done this in the past, and will agin this year.  Basically I only bring in my rare, or hard to start chilis.  This year it will be only a habanero that comes in for the winter.

In my experience the bush loses all it's leaves, goes bare like a tree would in winter and when I put it back out it grows better and faster than the previous year.  I water weekly during the winter, never have fertilized, but typically transplant into top notch soil when I bring it in and use a bigger container than the previous one it has lived in for the past year.  When I bring them in they go into a normal room in the house, somewhere they are out of the way. 

Joe