Author Topic: A Novice Prepper Meets Hurricane Sandy: my post-mortem  (Read 32239 times)

Offline TorontoGrl

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Re: A Novice Prepper Meets Hurricane Sandy: my post-mortem
« Reply #60 on: December 05, 2012, 06:21:23 AM »
Cordovil, thanks so much for sharing your Sandy experience, I was always on the fence when it came to generators, now I'm looking at the small try-fuel yamahas and hondas.  We're in a large city, almost in the centre and have 2 small kids, this is really helpful.

Offline bcksknr

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Re: A Novice Prepper Meets Hurricane Sandy: my post-mortem
« Reply #61 on: December 05, 2012, 07:12:21 AM »
We have been into the"Buckskinning" hobby for many years. It's basically like camping only your recreating the lifestyle of the 1800-1840 Fur Trade era time period. Ideally there should be nothing in camp that would have been in use before 1840. This pretty much puts you in the same situation as a modern blackout. Of course, there have to be some compromises made for health and safety. We have some very efficient coolers for food (that are disguised as bundles of trade goods). We also cook and heat water on a wood fire or a lump charcoal brazier box. A while back I made a canvas shower enclosure that we pitch behind our lodge. I had found a battery powered shower pump for camping at Gander Mountain outfitters. After a couple of days in the summer a hot shower is really needed. We heat a bucket of hot water on the brazier, move the bucket to the enclosure, drop in the pump and enjoy a shower. I've recently picked up a 12v. bilge (boat) pump at Harbor Freight that is more robust and I'm making it into a shower unit. I have a couple of smaller motorcycle sealed batteries for running stuff like this. I also have a couple of large deep cycle boat batteries for running 12v volt items. So even if you have running water, but no hot running water, you can still get clean heating water on a kitchen gas stove or propane campstove. Its just another option. If we ever have to evacuate our home, our lodge and rendezvous setup will go with us. .
I would also think that a deep cycle boat battery would keep low wattage 12v LED lights on for a long time. You could recharge from your genny during the day. I have also placed LED yard lights (minus the stake) on window sills around the house as a test and they charge nicely during the day and provide plenty of "nightlight" all night long. I'm glad your family came through the disaster safe and sound; good work!

Offline LvsChant

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Re: A Novice Prepper Meets Hurricane Sandy: my post-mortem
« Reply #62 on: December 05, 2012, 08:02:35 AM »
I'd say you all did very well, Cordovil... Thanks for sharing +1

Offline Eriko

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Re: A Novice Prepper Meets Hurricane Sandy: my post-mortem
« Reply #63 on: December 05, 2012, 01:55:55 PM »
Another idea I heard was a 5 gallon bucket,  detergent, and a good "soft rubber" toilet plunger (a plunger dedicated to this !! ) used to wash clothes. Just "plunge" the clothes vigorously and rinse. Works better than hand washing the usual way.

Hubby & I made on of these during the sandy outage. Worked great. Right after we wrung out the last piece of clothing & hung it up, our power was restored!  :o
But now we have a manual clothes washer already made.
-Eriko