Author Topic: Urban Preparedness for Young folks (and hello)  (Read 7913 times)

Zombie187

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Urban Preparedness for Young folks (and hello)
« on: April 13, 2009, 05:12:46 PM »
Hello everyone! I've been listening to the podcast for awhile, and previously have been weighing the options concerning having my wife and I (and coming child) prepared for events that are out of our control. I'm not necessarily concerned about catastrophic calamities (ex: Lights out), but once we move in a couple weeks I'm going to start up a garden in the back yard, and start my pantry going.

One thing that I've noticed, is that a lot of books, websites, and blogs focus and seem a bit biased to the middle aged individual who owns a home and has a bit more disposable income. I understand the concept of little by little, but I struggle to find resources and folks to bounce ideas off of that are in a similar situation to mine. We rent, and usually move once a year. We are fairly young at 28. We have virtually no debt outside of a school loan, as we just pay cash for things and save for what we need. Now that my wife is expecting, we are going to rent a house that we plan on staying in for awhile. We live in the Minneapolis area, in a fairly dense population zone. The biggest natural threat seems to be loss of power or utility in the winter because of an ice storm or blizzard, so thats kind of what I will be gearing my initial preparedness for. I made sure we got a solid (stone) house with a fireplace, fenced in backyard, garage etc. I have a couple of firearms (remington 870 riot/police issue, and a ruger mini 30).

In the less than likely to happen type of scenarios, My wifes family has some land "up north" with a cabin and camper trailer on it next to a lake. We also own land near there as well. It is a decent "bug  out" location, but as its near a lake its clear that a lot of other people would go their "cabin" or at least try to if there was a reason to flee the city. I asked her parents over easter if they had any extra food just in case, they dont. While her Dad is very handy, is good with guns, and a fireman, they arent really at all prepared for a bug in situation. I got the vibe they thought I was nuts for asking. It was weird.

If anyone has any particular advice for young people that dont already live out in the sticks, we'd love to hear it. Anyways, I just wanted to say hello to everyone. As for the Zombie handle, its fun to pretend you are preparing for a zombie attack, rather than something mundane like a power outage ;)




Offline TJ

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Re: Urban Preparedness for Young folks (and hello)
« Reply #1 on: April 13, 2009, 05:50:46 PM »
Haha, Im a senior in highschool, think of how hardit is for me to prepare haha. So I know where you're coming from, this killer $1500 a year for car insurance is horrible. That would be my DPMS AR-15 right there, if i had the money back. Livin with the parents and have my stockpile of camping gear from the past year helps if SHTF but im in no way monitarily prepared for a TEOTWAWKI and my family isnt too prepped.  The food isnt there, not much water (but an empty 30 gallon Civil Defense drum and bi-weekely 5-gal water deliveries), and an old .22 that loads under the barrel w/ 400 rounds. I guess i have what i need to survive, but not what i would like to have, haha.

Zombie187

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Re: Urban Preparedness for Young folks (and hello)
« Reply #2 on: April 13, 2009, 05:53:41 PM »
I was building an ar15 for awhile, and I realized it was a pretty big waste of money. Thats why I picked up my ruger mini 30. its about half the cost of building an ar15 thats worth a damn. DPMS is good stuff. I'm heading up there this month to go to their Outbreak thing. Its their zombie gtg.

Offline digger

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Re: Urban Preparedness for Young folks (and hello)
« Reply #3 on: April 13, 2009, 06:16:18 PM »
Ahhh, if I were young again..  In my mind, there should be a certain order to your madness :) Prepping will become second nature, and you already have an excellent start, by paying cash, little debt, and taking care of item #1.

1. First order of business is shelter. You've thought of that and are acting on it. For convenience sake, you might ask your landlord if you could pay a few months in advance, or just put the cash back for it.

2. Water..  plan your water storage now. Remember, at least a gallon a day for each person, for food/hydration issues. More is better for bathing/sponge baths. You might smell after a while. And it's been a while, but I bet babies could take more water for care than an adult. At least 7 days of water put back, should give you time to find other sources. Storage should be accomplished with plastic soda/juice bottles. Very economical, especially if you get them from your friends. Look into water filters such as the Berkfield units. Worth their weight in gold when needed.

3. Food.. another must, but it can be done economically. Initially aim for dried foods for long storage, but can be eaten in daily life also. Rice, barley, oats, many different beans, flour,both corn & wheat, initially, until you can afford a grain grinder, then bulk grains. Just $5 a week will buy many pounds of beans, grains or flours. Aim for 3 months, use what you buy, and rotate your supplies.

It can be overwhelming when just starting out, but just allocate a few dollars a week to the project, work it methodically, and you'll be way ahead of 90% of the population.  It is heartening to see young folks thinking ahead. The first step... just wrapping your mind around it... is the hardest.

Offline khristopher23

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Re: Urban Preparedness for Young folks (and hello)
« Reply #4 on: April 13, 2009, 06:32:01 PM »
Hello zombie187, and welcome to the forum. Congrats on the new baby.

Some of the most basic preps that need to be taken care of first, are really not too dependent on living in the sticks anyway, I wouldn't worry about that too much. I'm not too much older than you (33) and have 3 year old, and 6 mo old little boys. I would just rack up all the $$ I could until the baby gets here. Try to get at least $1000 emergency fund. Depending on the house you rent, I would immediately start thinking about alternate heat sources, considering your location. As soon as the baby gets here, if you're gonna bottle feed, figure out what formula agrees with him/her, and buy at least about 4 cans. As a side note both of our boys have done best on the Parents Choice brand from wal mart, it's ALOT cheaper than the big name brands that we started trying on our oldest. We thought more expensive must be better, until our pediatrician said she used the wal mart stuff. We switched to that, had no more problems. Anyway, getting back on topic, to me, making sure the kids are fed (and warm) is the #1 priority, so extra formula is a must if you go that route. If you're not gonna bottle feed, make sure you stock up on good healthy food to keep your wife healthy, the baby's nutrition is DIRECTLY related to your wife's in that situation. That's really something you can get started on now, is the food stockpiling. It's really not too expensive. Just $10 extra a week at the grocery store goes a long way. So, in your shoes I'd start saving all I could save, and throw an extra $10-$20 a week on the grocery budget. If your landlord will let you put in a small 4'x4' square foot garden, all the better, but I'd definitely  make saving money and food my main priorities for now. 

I agree with what digger is saying as well, sorry if I said some of the same stuff, we were typing our replies at the same time.

Zombie187

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Re: Urban Preparedness for Young folks (and hello)
« Reply #5 on: April 13, 2009, 06:39:02 PM »
Great input, thanks you guys!!!!  I was considering working with more canned goods than flour/wheat/beans as thats what I generally eat now. I'm not much of a cook/chef with basic ingredients. I should probably look into and have a book with common recipes on hand. It's crazy how much water you need per person. I was just going to buy stacks of bottled water as there is no sign that they ever go bad, other than attaining some of the taste of the plastic they are bottled in.

I'm still not in the parent frame of mind. All the stuff to stock up on for the baby hadn't even crossed my mind yet. I'll probably head to the cabin once fall comes a long to cut up and bring back a ton of wood for the fireplace. Our stove is gas. I'd like to assume that would continue to work in a power outage?

Do a lot of you folks make sure you have books and non power dependent entertainment around as well? I think state of mind is terribly important and this is something definitely worth considering...

When I was a kid I wish I had paid better attention. It's almost surreal how "lights out" and what the guys in there do and need (other than the sort of overdone gun porn) relate to my grandfathers skills. He lives in a fairly nice suburb of Milwaukee. he has a windmill in storage. A fucking windmill. Really. A big diesel generator a few hundred gallons of diesel fuel at all times. He grew up as a farmer, is an excellent hunter. I wish I wish I would have paid better attention growing up. The guy is just a crazy resource. He really doesn't talk much though. The silent type.


Offline TJ

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Re: Urban Preparedness for Young folks (and hello)
« Reply #6 on: April 13, 2009, 06:43:19 PM »
I know there's arguments on soda bottles vs water bottles and ect, but i would suggest 1 gallon water jugs as you can put carabiners on the handles or lash them down if you needed to go someone on foot instead of carrying the bottles in your pack, I guess there is the problem of the top coming off but i guess it depends. The company MSR sells a 10-liter water bladder also for about $30 (think big camelback with no tube) and is enclosed with 210D nylon ripstop.

5- gallon collapsible water cans are great too.

Water is a universal, but what you do for food is just what you like, see what works best, get some mountain house cans, some MRE's, dried camping food, see what you and your family likes best. I'll also add I like to keep a few tubes of camelbac elixir electrolyte tablets with my water, the orange flavored ones have caffiene in them also, but dont have sugar to they dont make your water containment methods sticky.

Offline khristopher23

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Re: Urban Preparedness for Young folks (and hello)
« Reply #7 on: April 13, 2009, 07:42:43 PM »
TJ, I know you have the best of intentions brother, but honestly, I think Camelbacs , MREs, and mountain house needs to be about the last things zombie needs to worry about right now.

As far as the food goes zombie, I haven't been prepping too long either, and kinda think the way you do. I know you get the most "bang for your buck" with the buckets of rice and beans, but were going with the stuff we really EAT first. Every week when we go to the grocery store, I pick one certain thing to buy, and I spend about $10-$15 ,or even less, on that one item.

I promise not to go through my whole pantry, but here's how we started.

 Water would be a good place to start. It's like 75€ a gallon at walmart. Week one spend $9 extra on water, put it under your bed, or whatever. I think we went with Kraft Mac and cheese next, it was on sale for like 50€ a box. We were a little broke that week, so we spent $6 extra on 12 boxes. Instant potatoes, again 75€ a box- $9 for potatoes. We got a pretty picky 3 (almost) year old, but that's 2 things he will eat. We ocassionally eat those Lipton rice sides, so I picked up 6 of those the next week. OK, so we got 12+12+6=30 side dishes that are hearty enough to about eat as a stand alone dinner. 

  Next we started on soups and Chef Boyardee type stuff 6-12 of different kinds every week till we had 30 cans, sure soup for lunch everyday would suck, but would beat not eating. Then we started with instant oatmeal and grits. Once those breakfasts were taken care of, back to dinners , to get canned vegetables to go with the other side dishes. This is really where we're at now, but I gotta backtrack to fill in some of the stuff we used, and didn't keep up with replacing. I think once we get caught back up, I'm gonna start on powdered milk, then meat. I want to eventually have 6-12 lbs each of ground beef and boneless chicken breast in the freezer. I know a lot of preppers get concerned about not having electricity, but in the 4 years I've lived here, the power has never been out longer than 6-7 hours. I want to start with 30 days of stuff we usually use, including all the meat, so if need be, we could stay here a month without leaving and eat regularly. Once we get that 30 days taken care of, then we will look into the more long term rice, beans, and mountain house type plans.

But again, I cannot stress CASH enough in your situation. It'll be there for rent, groceries, gas, whatever. I think my wife was in the hospital 2 days with the second baby, and three days with the first. You'd be surprised how much you can spend just on fast food, wanting to stay near the hospital.

 

Offline TJ

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Re: Urban Preparedness for Young folks (and hello)
« Reply #8 on: April 13, 2009, 09:16:01 PM »
Yeah I kinda spaced out on that post, although I just meant try some different types of food storage, canned would probably be best, and I was referring to the canned mountain house stuff (I think that was the brand at least). Best intentions though, i got a lot to learn ;D haha.

Offline Sister Wolf

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Re: Urban Preparedness for Young folks (and hello)
« Reply #9 on: April 13, 2009, 09:18:42 PM »
Haha, Im a senior in highschool, think of how hardit is for me to prepare haha.

How old are you, TJ?

Offline Ultio1

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Re: Urban Preparedness for Young folks (and hello)
« Reply #10 on: April 13, 2009, 09:51:45 PM »
Never let it get you down fellas, being young and a prepper has its disadvantages but starting young is always good. You are ahead of lots of people your ages. My advice to the young prepper is to busy yourself with survival skills. Most dont take a lot of money.  Its the kind "stocking up" that cant be taken away. lost or consumed. You will always have it.  Dont just learn them, practice them, get good at them.  Canned food is still cheap. Even a senior in high school can afford a little.

 As for the coming baby, start buying extra diapers now, trust me you wont regret it.

Offline khristopher23

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Re: Urban Preparedness for Young folks (and hello)
« Reply #11 on: April 13, 2009, 10:12:58 PM »
Yeah I kinda spaced out on that post, although I just meant try some different types of food storage, canned would probably be best, and I was referring to the canned mountain house stuff (I think that was the brand at least). Best intentions though, i got a lot to learn ;D haha.

No man, that  not bad advice at all. Especially for someone in your situation. I noticed you said you were in highschool, man that is the PERFECT time to start buying all the cool gear like Camelbacs, military web gear, cool knives, guns, and all that stuff. Stuff like that's not gonna wear out very quickly, so you can have it around for pretty much ever. Stock up on it now while you don't really have to worry about rent, utility bills, groceries, and all that other junk (Your insurance bill does sound pretty bad though, so I know it's not all roses and sunshine). Man you're doing good just thinking about all this stuff now. You're in a position to be SO much farther ahead earlier in life than some of the rest of us.

The food thing will be easier for you too. As for myself, I didn't start all of this until I already had 3 other mouths to feed. Dude, you can build up a year for one person relatively easy. Then, when it comes time to start a family (and you should have AT LEAST 10-12 years before you're ready for that, assuming that you are 18), you automatically start the family with a 6 month supply of food. Build that back up to a year, and keep going like that.

But really man, I didn't mean to sound snobby at all or anything, just different times in life bring with them different worries. There are quite a few very transitional times in life, and you're hitting a different one than Zombie187 is. The one you are at is very important as well. Be very careful of the decisions you make now, just starting out, as it's hard to see now how there going to affect your life in the future, it's pretty easy to look back and see what you should've done, but not as easy to tell beforehand. Decisions you make now are "preps" that you may not even realize. Choose your career path well now, and you won't have to try to figure out how to start all over later in life. Make good financial decisions. That new car looks nice and shiny now, but I promise it won't look nearly as good halfway into a 60 or72 month loan. CREDIT CARDS SUCK. I could go on and on, but man, I'm starting to sound old :)

Offline TJ

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Re: Urban Preparedness for Young folks (and hello)
« Reply #12 on: April 13, 2009, 10:30:41 PM »
Haha yeah, Sr in highschool, 18 yrs.  I kinda started into this about freshman yr because I kinda have an older mental age, if you know what i mean, and I did a lot of camping, backpacking, stormchasing, volunteer disaster work, ect so lots of that gear is great. Now that I can get on these forums its great. I'd like to stick away from the debt and i've got about 5k roughly for the truck ill be buying soon-ish, and 3k left over.  Parents always made me pay for most of my own stuff so I was good at putting money away, i got nothing for truck, insurance, ect.

I got quite a bit of the "cool stuff" haha. Wish I could get the firearms though, im pretty much even on income/expenses right now. Only problem is for the moment I live with the parents and "prepping" might come across as odd with them because I dont have much room for private storage. Anyways, yeah, haha.

I posted because it was for "Young Folks" but i missed his age and i figured it might be similar to my situation, but he was a bit older with more resources and more expenses.

Offline Sister Wolf

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Re: Urban Preparedness for Young folks (and hello)
« Reply #13 on: April 13, 2009, 10:37:57 PM »
That is so extremely cool, TJ.  It's awesome to hear that young adults like you are already seeing the light.  +1 to you, man.

Offline Craig67

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Re: Urban Preparedness for Young folks (and hello)
« Reply #14 on: April 13, 2009, 10:42:13 PM »
I'll keep it short and simple.

Water : A weeks worth in good storage containers like 5 gal bottles or military water cans. Get a quality water filter like MSR, Katadyn or PUR

Food : Minimum 30 days of your regular foods. Then think of another couple of months of LTS (Long Term Storage) foods.

Shelter: Seems like you've got that done.

Heating/ Cooking: Firewood your doing, good. Think about kerosene or propane heaters. A decent camp stove in the fuel of your choice.

Protection: You've got a couple of decent long arms, add a couple of pistols (I'm a Glock fan) and a .22 rifle. Get ammo, 1000 7.62X39, 100 OO Buckshot, 50 slugs and a case of small game loads ( #6 or 7.5's, whatevers used in your area), a couple of hundred JHP's for the pistols and 2- 3,000 .22 long rifle.

Seriously think about putting in a cache with food, fuel and tools in at your property "up north". Think of it as your INCH cache (I'm Never Coming Home).

HTH,

Craig

Edit'ed to add :

Medical : Assemble a good first aid kit and get training.

« Last Edit: April 13, 2009, 10:52:51 PM by Craig67 »

Offline The Wilderness

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Re: Urban Preparedness for Young folks (and hello)
« Reply #15 on: April 13, 2009, 11:02:06 PM »
Do what you can when you can, if you cant buy preps then make preps, if you cant make preps then learn about making preps.

The point is DO SOMETHING. Always be moving forward. Be better prepared today than yesterday, it adds up over time.

Learn, Do, Teach

Doing something will give you peace of mind.


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Re: Urban Preparedness for Young folks (and hello)
« Reply #16 on: April 13, 2009, 11:34:16 PM »
Also, do not get too focused on one aspect of prepping, what I mean is make sure that each area gets attention, I find myself becoming narrow minded and focusing on one thing. I will focus on my defense and let my food and water suffer, I will focus on my food and water and my building things suffers. Stay broad minded and give each area its deserved attention. What good is a strong defense if you have nothing to defend, what good is having 6 months of food and only 3 weeks of water? Do you have medical supplies and little training? I think you get my point. Balance it out.

Offline khristopher23

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Re: Urban Preparedness for Young folks (and hello)
« Reply #17 on: April 14, 2009, 01:34:45 AM »
Also, do not get too focused on one aspect of prepping, what I mean is make sure that each area gets attention, I find myself becoming narrow minded and focusing on one thing. I will focus on my defense and let my food and water suffer, I will focus on my food and water and my building things suffers. Stay broad minded and give each area its deserved attention. What good is a strong defense if you have nothing to defend, what good is having 6 months of food and only 3 weeks of water? Do you have medical supplies and little training? I think you get my point. Balance it out.

I think a lot of us do that TW, not really to big of a deal as long as you catch it before it gets too out of hand. It's hard for me to slow down on the guns and books ( I got like a 6 page Amazon wishlist). But then I move to food for awhile, then maybe work on the emergency fund for awhile. My problem is I neglect an area for too long, like food for instance, and we end up using a lot of what I have stored. I also just had several vehicle repairs back to back which took most of the emergency fund I had started, so I have moved back to those 2 things. I'm still pretty new at this, so it's taking a little while to work all the bugs out of my plans.

Zombie187

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Re: Urban Preparedness for Young folks (and hello)
« Reply #18 on: April 14, 2009, 01:37:09 AM »
Dave Ramsey's Financial Peace University really helped us out w/ the financial stuff, and planning and setting up an emergency fund.

Offline BigDanInTX

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Re: Urban Preparedness for Young folks (and hello)
« Reply #19 on: April 14, 2009, 06:20:08 AM »
First off, I would really like to welcome the younger types to the forum.  I commend you on your decision to start your adult lives off properly by preparing for your future.  Far too often, younger people are only concerned about immediate impulse wants.  You are already well on your way to a great start on life.

One thing you have an advantage of is more disposable income versus bills.  I remember back when my wife and I were first together, we made less, but we had so much more disposable cash and we bought a bunch of crap, spent alot on eating out.  If I had been in the mindset of where you guys appear to be today, I could have been in a much better position to set aside money, purchase some land and start things off right.  Instead, I'm playing a bit of catch-up now that I have less disposable income because I have two kids and a wife.

You're well on your way just by being here.  Make some financial goals, start purchasing a little bit each week, get yourself some land, start a garden, learn some skills, and everything will fall into place for you.  Good luck to you guys.  =-D
« Last Edit: April 14, 2009, 06:40:35 AM by BigDanInTX »

Offline Morning Sunshine

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Re: Urban Preparedness for Young folks (and hello)
« Reply #20 on: April 14, 2009, 09:09:09 AM »
Welcome!
my first question is "Is your wife on board with the preps?"  or are you the old-fashioned MAN who just plans for the future of his family because that is your job (no offense intended -  I think that is admirable, I am just asking to know where your wife is)
if she is, get her to help learning how to prepare food from the staples (beans, rice, whole grains) because you will want to know how to use the long term storage as well as having your bodies adjusted to them. 
I would respectfully disagree with the "stock up on diapers" advice, though.  Babies grow at such different rates, that if you buy 4 packs of one size, baby will outgrow them after 1.5 packs are used.  I have 4, and one stayed in newborn size for 1 week, and another for 5.  One child wore size 3s for 2 years, another 1 year.  One child didn't potty train until he was wearing size 6's (of which I still have some, thinking I would use with the next) and the next 2 trained in size 4s.  What I wish we had done, had I known about it with the first, was elimination communication (http://www.freewebs.com/freetoec/ http://www.naturalbirthandbabycare.com/elimination-communication.html).  it sounds kind of weird and gross, but my SIL and her husband did it, and they love it.  I keep wanting to try it with #4 now, but with 3 other children (one of whom is starting the potty training), being that in tune with his system is almost impossible!  Anyway, if you did that, it would be help in any type of emergency.
My preps have so far been food related.  dh is on board with me, but he works so much that it is pretty much all on me.  And he is a computer geek, so very little handyman skills.  Building is our plans for the summer, learning the skills to build things with wood - solar cooker, dehydrator, and a green house.  also, we are really going to try and get our garden to actually produce SOMETHING this year.  which brings me to my next point - you having a garden in your rental.  Do a container garden.  then you can take it with you when you move, but you will also have learned the skills of gardening.  And you know, Jack has mentioned he is only in his mid-30s.

Offline Harold J. Forbes

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Re: Urban Preparedness for Young folks (and hello)
« Reply #21 on: April 14, 2009, 09:19:02 AM »
I'm not as experienced as many here, but I am pretty close to your profile (30yo, married with two 16 month olds and one on the way), so I will share some of my opinions and thoughts picked up along the way.

First, get you finances in order. This is the time of your life where you can either put yourself relatively far ahead or way behind. Avoid unnecessary debt and work hard to pay off the debt you've already incurred. There is a lot of freedom in only having to worry about one reasonable mortgage payment and not being burdened with student loan payments, car payments, credit card payments, etc. Build up that emergency fund. You'll sleep a lot better and be in a better position for future preps and in the event the SHTF if you don't have a lot of debt and have a good cushion of cash.

Second, consider buying a house if it makes sense financially. It is more work and probably a longer commute, but there is some comfort in not having to worry about a landlord jacking up the rent on you when it comes time to renew the lease. Plus with a house you would have more room for preps like water and food storage, gardens, etc. As I'm sure you know there is a lot of stress involved in a move, and having a wife and kids involved compounds it exponentially.

Third, as others have indicated, don't stress out trying to do everything at once. You don't need to instantly plant a garden, amass two years of food storage, and stock enough guns and ammo to arm a Mexican drug cartel. Build stockpiles gradually as space and finances allow. Work on basic items, like putting together 72 hour kits (or bug out bags if you prefer that term), developing emergency plans and evacuation routes, etc. Once you have the basics, then move on to more hardcore survivalist stuff. And try to learn skills along the way, even if it is only by reading.

Congrats on the baby! As mentioned, be sure to have supplies for the baby as well and don't be afraid of store brand diapers and formula. We used the Members Mark formula from Sams Club and it costs about half what the Enfamil formula does (even at Sams Club pricing). When our kids were still using formula, we kept a minimum of six cans on hand. We've been really happy with Walgreens brand diapers as well, and if you watch some of the coupon forums you can find these diapers dirt cheap (last week they had jumbo packs for $2.50 after coupon). I'd disagree with Morning Sunshine about not stocking up on diapers, just because if you can find a good deal it is worth it to store them. If you kids grow out of that size, you can always take the unopened packs back to the store to exchange for a larger size, or at worst if you keep your receipt you can get a refund. Just keep in mind kids with typically stay in some sizes longer than others. Our kids were in size 1 for a while (but being twins they were a bit small), spent only a few weeks in size 2, spent forever in size 3, were in size 4 for about a month, and have been in size 5s for a while now. If you were going to stock up, I'd say to buy mostly sizes 3 and 5. HTH...

Offline Sister Wolf

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Re: Urban Preparedness for Young folks (and hello)
« Reply #22 on: April 14, 2009, 11:12:18 AM »
I think a lot of us do that TW, not really to big of a deal as long as you catch it before it gets too out of hand. It's hard for me to slow down on the guns and books ( I got like a 6 page Amazon wishlist). But then I move to food for awhile, then maybe work on the emergency fund for awhile. My problem is I neglect an area for too long, like food for instance, and we end up using a lot of what I have stored. I also just had several vehicle repairs back to back which took most of the emergency fund I had started, so I have moved back to those 2 things. I'm still pretty new at this, so it's taking a little while to work all the bugs out of my plans.

Sounds exactly like us, Kris.   :D

Zombie187

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Re: Urban Preparedness for Young folks (and hello)
« Reply #23 on: April 14, 2009, 12:26:17 PM »
Welcome!
my first question is "Is your wife on board with the preps?"

She's on board with whatever I do as long as its well intentioned. She trusts me. Good advice on the diapers everyone.

Offline TJ

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Re: Urban Preparedness for Young folks (and hello)
« Reply #24 on: April 14, 2009, 03:40:07 PM »
Bigdan, good points there, I just have some problem with stocking food because of my parents asking questions, as they arent too prepared. When i stock MRE's and Power-Bars, at least i just say they're for camping (Im lucky our school has an oudoor adventure club, cant get out to camp much outside of school) and that club has some fellow preppers and fellow rednecks, haha.

Zombie187

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Re: Urban Preparedness for Young folks (and hello)
« Reply #25 on: April 14, 2009, 08:29:30 PM »
why do your parents fight it?

Offline Heavy G

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Re: Urban Preparedness for Young folks (and hello)
« Reply #26 on: April 14, 2009, 08:55:02 PM »
Hey, if you don't have any debt or very little, and your spouse is on board, you're doing better than most. 

This forum is a free library of knowledge.  Amazing knowledge.  If money is tight, you can do the basic things (like water) and learn, learn, learn.  Your income will start to go up.  Then you can spend the money.  You'll have the knowledge so you won't spend money on things that don't work.

I've been poor all my life and only recently have had any money.  It's natural.

Offline TJ

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Re: Urban Preparedness for Young folks (and hello)
« Reply #27 on: April 15, 2009, 05:54:01 AM »
why do your parents fight it?

I'll leave it at saying I might want to focus more on school than the outdoors and prepping. Not bad grades, but not the best.

Offline Chris Redfield

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Re: Urban Preparedness for Young folks (and hello)
« Reply #28 on: April 15, 2009, 07:04:31 AM »
There is some truth in that too, TJ. Knowledge is a priceless resource.

Or you can look at it in financial terms. If you get good grades, you get scholarships and bursaries. If you get scholarships and bursaries, that's more money you have for prepping! :)

Offline khristopher23

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Re: Urban Preparedness for Young folks (and hello)
« Reply #29 on: April 15, 2009, 07:15:55 AM »
I'll leave it at saying I might want to focus more on school than the outdoors and prepping. Not bad grades, but not the best.

Went through the same thing man, except it was guitars for me instead of prepping though.