Author Topic: Chemical spill response guidebook as a prep  (Read 2990 times)

Offline Blue_Sky

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Chemical spill response guidebook as a prep
« on: July 02, 2014, 09:04:42 AM »
Hey all,

I'm still an amateur prepper so if this has been discussed and I missed it I apologize. Doing a little research it looks like about 1000 people die every year from chemical spills in the United States. A little less than half of that is due to transport accidents, but if someone wants to be prepared for anything I think it would be worthwhile for someone who puts on a lot of highway miles or lives within a few miles of railroad tracks to have a hazmat emergency response guidebook and a pair of low powered binoculars available. You would be able  to look up the chemical ID number on the container's placard and respond or evacuate as appropriate based on the chemical.

Here's a link to a pdf of the book I'm thinking about, and I got trained on. It runs about $9 to get a hard copy:
http://phmsa.dot.gov/pv_obj_cache/pv_obj_id_7410989F4294AE44A2EBF6A80ADB640BCA8E4200/filename/ERG2012.pdf

Offline Cedar

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Re: Chemical spill response guidebook as a prep
« Reply #1 on: July 02, 2014, 09:27:39 AM »
I have two aps on my cell phone too.

1. Chemical Data Safety Sheets is one. When we were doing a class at the fire station last month or so, we were using the book, but I also used my ap and I was finding things faster than in the book. Same information.
https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/chemical-safety-data-sheets/id405208132?mt=8

the other ap is..

2. Placard + Free. And you can 'dial in' the placard number, ideally with binocculars before you get to the accident scene. There are a couple nasty YouTube vids where a LEO died from getting near this noxious stuff that spilled from a wreck. When I am in the passenger seat on the freeway, sometimes I will just start putting placard numbers from semi trucks in, to see what noxious things are riding at 55-65 mph 10 feet from where I am sitting.
https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/placard+/id316803800?mt=8 but look for the Free version.

Cedar

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Re: Chemical spill response guidebook as a prep
« Reply #2 on: July 02, 2014, 09:51:42 AM »
I have two aps on my cell phone too.

1. Chemical Data Safety Sheets is one. When we were doing a class at the fire station last month or so, we were using the book, but I also used my ap and I was finding things faster than in the book. Same information.
https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/chemical-safety-data-sheets/id405208132?mt=8

the other ap is..

2. Placard + Free. And you can 'dial in' the placard number, ideally with binocculars before you get to the accident scene. There are a couple nasty YouTube vids where a LEO died from getting near this noxious stuff that spilled from a wreck. When I am in the passenger seat on the freeway, sometimes I will just start putting placard numbers from semi trucks in, to see what noxious things are riding at 55-65 mph 10 feet from where I am sitting.
https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/placard+/id316803800?mt=8 but look for the Free version.

Cedar
I've got those, too.  Good stuff and great because you can have it with you all the time.  Combined with the SeeLevel app for measuring distance (and to zoom) in this application (also great for measuring slope for calculating wildland fire Rate Of Spread calculations), it's a great tool for helping to understand just how far away you are.  It's probably more accurate than the old donut hole technique used in law enforcement.  If you couldn't fit the entire scene inside your donut hole, you were too close.  If the powder from your donut was getting on your uniform, the wind was blowing toward you and you should back up more. ;)

Offline TexasGirl

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Re: Chemical spill response guidebook as a prep
« Reply #3 on: July 02, 2014, 10:21:58 AM »
I've got those, too.  Good stuff and great because you can have it with you all the time.  Combined with the SeeLevel app for measuring distance (and to zoom) in this application (also great for measuring slope for calculating wildland fire Rate Of Spread calculations), it's a great tool for helping to understand just how far away you are.  It's probably more accurate than the old donut hole technique used in law enforcement.  If you couldn't fit the entire scene inside your donut hole, you were too close.  If the powder from your donut was getting on your uniform, the wind was blowing toward you and you should back up more. ;)

And all this time I never knew there was a tactical reason for cops to always have donuts.  Obviously, the problem is that donuts come 12 to the box, so something has to be done with the extra 11.  And the powdered sugar won't hold up in humidity, so a constant supply chain is involved.

I hate to think of the impact such a smartphone app would have on the donut industry.  Doors may be soon closing by the thousands.

~TG

FarmerJim

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Re: Chemical spill response guidebook as a prep
« Reply #4 on: July 06, 2014, 02:38:24 PM »
I have two aps on my cell phone too.

1. Chemical Data Safety Sheets is one. When we were doing a class at the fire station last month or so, we were using the book, but I also used my ap and I was finding things faster than in the book. Same information.
https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/chemical-safety-data-sheets/id405208132?mt=8

the other ap is..

2. Placard + Free. And you can 'dial in' the placard number, ideally with binocculars before you get to the accident scene. There are a couple nasty YouTube vids where a LEO died from getting near this noxious stuff that spilled from a wreck. When I am in the passenger seat on the freeway, sometimes I will just start putting placard numbers from semi trucks in, to see what noxious things are riding at 55-65 mph 10 feet from where I am sitting.
https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/placard+/id316803800?mt=8 but look for the Free version.

Cedar

I was a Hazmat Tech/IC in my military days and I still have similar apps on my phone. About this time 2011 I actually pulled up behind a 18 wheeler on fire near the Port of LA and used the app to help the driver go through the bill of lading to ensure it was just a standard fire. (From about 50 yards away of course.) Called up LA Fire and First thing they asked was "what's in it?"

Offline oktheniknow

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Re: Chemical spill response guidebook as a prep
« Reply #5 on: July 21, 2014, 11:01:52 PM »
For those interested it wouldn't hurt to take a free CERT course if in your area. I went through one years ago and a couple of classes taught about how to read chemical notations on transport vehicles. The fire chief opened our eyes to all the hazardous stuff that comes through the area on a routine basis that people are oblivious to.

Offline reefmarker

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Re: Chemical spill response guidebook as a prep
« Reply #6 on: July 22, 2014, 12:09:55 PM »
These books are nice because they show you the results/protections necessary for massive spills of chemicals.

If you are like me I spent alot of time around alot of different very bad chemicals in a lab setting.  They never really seemed like a big deal, even small spills on my skin, etc. didn't mean much, just wash it off.  Now I am in an industrial setting and spills take on a whole new meaning.  That couple of milliliters of Nitric Acid really sucks when it becomes 10 gallons or 100 gallons.  Even caustic when you spill a few gallons will do bad stuff to you with one little breath.   If you want real fun try formic acid or anhydrous ammonia!

If you really need information fast, there is always chemtrek.  I don't know their number off the top of my head, but they can get you in touch with the emergency operations centers of most chemical manufacturers and they are very happy to help you fix any issues with their products because they don't want a black eye as being "unprepared" for chemical spills.  What's funny is last time I called them they asked if I could call back.  I did not have a time critical issue, so I said yes.  Turns out their building was on fire!