Author Topic: Chestnuts for North Texas?  (Read 3114 times)

Offline jaseemtp

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Chestnuts for North Texas?
« on: February 16, 2015, 03:02:12 PM »
So I have been caught up in the talk about chestnuts.  I am not interested in growing 10 or so trees.  My question is can I grow productive American chestnuts in Texas or should I go with Chinese chestnuts?  I am near Fort Worth Texas if that helps on figuring out climate issues.

Jason

Offline Kreindl

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Re: Chestnuts for North Texas?
« Reply #1 on: February 24, 2015, 06:05:55 AM »
From what I've read the American chessnut trees will get the blight and die.  There are 98% American with 2% Japanese which are resistant.  Also check your soil to see if it is acidic at all.  They like a bit of acid.  I plan to try some since I have patches of scrub oak and Mark Shepard says chestnuts grow where oaks grow.

Offline jaseemtp

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Re: Chestnuts for North Texas?
« Reply #2 on: February 25, 2015, 09:16:12 AM »
Thanks for the response.
Where I am we have tons of red oaks. I do not know if chestnuts have ever existed in this part of the county, but since oaks can host the blight unaffected I guess it is possible it is here. Our soil is typically very alkaline,but I will try to do a PH test.

Offline PermacultureTrees

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Re: Chestnuts for North Texas?
« Reply #3 on: November 18, 2015, 05:56:12 PM »
We are growing chessnut trees 100 miles east of Dallas. I don't know how or if they will make nuts because they are only 3 years old.  They are growing strong as any Oak tree..

Offline perma

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Re: Chestnuts for North Texas?
« Reply #4 on: November 18, 2015, 11:52:22 PM »
You'll have to go with Chinese or hybrid chestnuts.  The Chinese trees are shorter and multi-stemmed while the hybrids have an upright habit. 

American trees will grow for a while but the blight will destroy them sooner or later.  Plant some if you have the space and maybe you'll be lucky enough and find a resistant tree.

Offline GraceNmercy

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Re: Chestnuts for North Texas?
« Reply #5 on: July 05, 2019, 06:58:20 PM »
So I have been caught up in the talk about chestnuts.  I am not interested in growing 10 or so trees.  My question is can I grow productive American chestnuts in Texas or should I go with Chinese chestnuts?  I am near Fort Worth Texas if that helps on figuring out climate issues.

Jason

I've been growing chestnuts about 2 hours southeast of where you are for about 5 or 6 years now and gotten nut production for about 2 years from a couple of trees. I have a couple of hundred planted. I have both, Chinese, Dunstan (mostly Chinese with some American), 56% American hybrids, 87% American hybrids, 97% American hybrids, and even a few small pure Americans planted.

Before blight American chestnuts were native east of the Mississippi river, but we have a couple of chestnut species native to east Texas, which include the Allegheny chinquapin and Ozark chinquapin further up in northeast Texas. I know of several chinquapin trees growing throughout east Texas, some I've came across while hiking or turkey hunting, and others reported to me after putting the word out in Anderson county looking for Ozark chinquapins in their southwestern most range for the Ozark chinquapin foundation.

If you're located in Fort Worth the soils there are more alkaline and chestnuts may not do so well. I'm originally from Fort Worth and soils up that way are typically at least a ph of 6. 6 might be your max ph for growing chestnuts, but 5.8 - 4.5 are best. There are lots of oaks that grow on alkaline soil all over west Texas, but most oaks can grow in most types of Texas soils except fr the east oaks such as true white oaks. Have a soil test done and if it's anything over 6.1 ph I wouldn't try and plant chestnuts unless your ready to treat the soil to make it more acid.

Anyway, you've probably already tested it out by now as the post is a few years old, but just thought I'd share in case someone else was interested in growing chestnuts.