Author Topic: Black Locust  (Read 5986 times)

Offline msparks

  • Survivor
  • ***
  • Posts: 167
  • Karma: 7
    • Michael Sparks, Journey to success
Black Locust
« on: April 11, 2015, 08:03:55 AM »

Jack has talked a little about Black Locust on his show but I'm wondering if I should consider this tree.

We had Black Locust on our Farm in Ohio when I was growing up. They grew all over an open strip mine that was on our property. From what I understand this tree can be invasive.

I do understand it can be beneficial for bees in the spring as well as a good nitrogen fixer for the soil.

My concern would be that it would take over and crowd out other trees.

Thought, insights or opinions on Black Locust would be appreciated.

Offline Mr. Bill

  • Like a hot cocoa mojito
  • Administrator
  • Ultimate Survival Veteran
  • *******
  • Posts: 15222
  • Karma: 1873
  • Trained Attack Sheepdog/Troll hunter
    • Website Maintenance and Online Presence Management by Mr. Bill
Re: Black Locust
« Reply #1 on: April 11, 2015, 10:14:02 AM »
We had 3 huge old Black Locusts in our yard (several houses ago).  In our area (southeast Washington), the big issue is locust borers.  As the name implies, they tunnel all through the wood, cause large heavy branches to break off when it's windy, and open up the trunk to getting rotted out inside.  I'd think they would be a great tree if you live in an area that doesn't have locust borers -- otherwise they're sorta high-maintenance (need regular injections of systemic insecticide to prevent damage).

They can spread by runners/roots underground.  When we cut down one hollowed-out tree, we suddenly had about 50 new little trees coming up all over the place.

Offline msparks

  • Survivor
  • ***
  • Posts: 167
  • Karma: 7
    • Michael Sparks, Journey to success
Re: Black Locust
« Reply #2 on: April 11, 2015, 10:20:02 AM »
I can tell you it's the best burning wood there is. Good luck splitting it (manually at least). In Ohio they would get infested with these large black ants. Of course when you go to burn it you bring some logs inside and the ants become active then you have these darned black ants all over the place. It does burn hot and clean. Hardly any ash when it's burned.

I just don't see how the benefits outway the negatives. Maybe Jack could chime in.

Offline Marinesg1012

  • Survivalist Mentor
  • *****
  • Posts: 511
  • Karma: 15
  • New TSP Forum member
Re: Black Locust
« Reply #3 on: April 11, 2015, 09:21:16 PM »
I plan on planting some in a strip with some fruit trees for nitrogen fixing, fence posts and fuel wood.... they seem to be a good all around tree with a lot of uses. I also think if you don't have a plan for those uses then they will get out of control.

Offline CharlesH

  • Survivalist Mentor
  • *****
  • Posts: 900
  • Karma: 21
  • Hope is a method...
Re: Black Locust
« Reply #4 on: April 12, 2015, 07:53:20 AM »
They are absolutely loved by the bees.  I have been told not to burn them in indoor woodburners, though, because of creosote. Guess I need to do some more research on that.  Their root systems spread far and wide.  If you have them near a place where you want to dig or work soil, the roots will likely be in your way.

Offline Oil Lady

  • Lady oil lady oil la-dy hoo
  • Survival Demonstrator
  • *******
  • Posts: 4503
  • Karma: 316
  • My book needs more humor. My pen needs more salt.
Re: Black Locust
« Reply #5 on: April 12, 2015, 01:58:57 PM »
Creosote?

Did another poster just say the wood burns super clean? And yet creosote is still a problem?

Is it a particularly oily wood?

Offline CharlesH

  • Survivalist Mentor
  • *****
  • Posts: 900
  • Karma: 21
  • Hope is a method...
Re: Black Locust
« Reply #6 on: April 12, 2015, 02:49:26 PM »
Creosote?

Did another poster just say the wood burns super clean? And yet creosote is still a problem?

Is it a particularly oily wood?
 
It is super hard, and super resistant to rot.  But yes, I see here that it apparantly burns clean.  I have been told in the past not to burn it in a woodburner, but maybe that advice was poor.

Offline msparks

  • Survivor
  • ***
  • Posts: 167
  • Karma: 7
    • Michael Sparks, Journey to success
Re: Black Locust
« Reply #7 on: April 13, 2015, 06:17:19 AM »
I don't recall any creosote problems. My parents and brother that still live in Ohio burn it regularly.

It can be hard to get started, it's always best to get your fire going with easier to start wood. Also this stuff gets really hot and lasts a long time so unless it's cold out maybe reserve this for a true winter wood to burn. 

Offline CharlesH

  • Survivalist Mentor
  • *****
  • Posts: 900
  • Karma: 21
  • Hope is a method...
Re: Black Locust
« Reply #8 on: April 13, 2015, 07:15:15 AM »
Thanks. I did look around a bit online and most people agree with you.  That's a good thing because I have a lot of it that I have only been using with campfires.

Offline outoforder2day

  • Survivalist Mentor
  • *****
  • Posts: 399
  • Karma: 37
  • Semper Ubi Sub Ubi
    • The End Of The Tunnel
Re: Black Locust
« Reply #9 on: April 13, 2015, 11:12:26 AM »
Do keep in mind that they aren't the best for some animals. Like Horses.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robinia_pseudoacacia#Toxicity

Offline redbelliedhound

  • Prepper
  • **
  • Posts: 45
  • Karma: 0
  • New TSP Forum member
    • Red Bellied Hound
Re: Black Locust
« Reply #10 on: April 17, 2015, 08:15:38 PM »
My father would cringe hearing about using black locust as a burning wood.

He uses it for this sort of thing~



Offline rogersorders

  • Survivor
  • ***
  • Posts: 127
  • Karma: 16
Re: Black Locust
« Reply #11 on: April 18, 2015, 11:18:44 AM »
^^That is beautiful grain. I've heard you have to cut it wet because it's too hard after it cures

Offline msparks

  • Survivor
  • ***
  • Posts: 167
  • Karma: 7
    • Michael Sparks, Journey to success
Re: Black Locust
« Reply #12 on: April 20, 2015, 08:45:11 AM »
My father would cringe hearing about using black locust as a burning wood.

He uses it for this sort of thing~


Wow, that's nice. Wish I had that type of talent, patience, and time to do something like that.


Bonnieblue2A

  • Guest
Re: Black Locust
« Reply #13 on: April 20, 2015, 09:06:44 AM »
@redbelliedhound,  I had no idea that the grain on Black Locust was that pretty.  It looks nicer than Black Walnut.   Thank you for posting that photo.   :)